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Your search found 12 Results

  1. 1
    377504
    Peer Reviewed

    Potential impact of multiple interventions on HIV incidence in a hyperendemic region in Western Kenya: a modelling study.

    Blaizot S; Maman D; Riche B; Mukui I; Kirubi B; Ecochard R; Etard JF

    BMC Infectious Diseases. 2016 Apr 29; 16:189.

    BACKGROUND: Multiple prevention interventions, including early antiretroviral therapy initiation, may reduce HIV incidence in hyperendemic settings. Our aim was to predict the short-term impact of various single and combined interventions on HIV spreading in the adult population of Ndhiwa subcounty (Nyanza Province, Kenya). METHODS: A mathematical model was used with data on adults (15-59 years) from the Ndhiwa HIV Impact in Population Survey to compare the impacts on HIV prevalence, HIV incidence rate, and population viral load suppression of various interventions. These interventions included: improving the cascade of care (use of three guidelines), increasing voluntary medical male circumcision (VMMC), and implementing pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) use among HIV-uninfected women. RESULTS: After four years, improving separately the cascade of care under the WHO 2013 guidelines and under the treat-all strategy would reduce the overall HIV incidence rate by 46 and 58 %, respectively, vs. the baseline rate, and by 35 and 49 %, respectively, vs. the implementation of the current Kenyan guidelines. With conservative and optimistic scenarios, VMMC and PrEP would reduce the HIV incidence rate by 15-25 % and 22-28 % vs. the baseline, respectively. Combining the WHO 2013 guidelines with VMMC would reduce the HIV incidence rate by 35-56 % and combining the treat-all strategy with VMMC would reduce it by 49-65 %. Combining the WHO 2013 guidelines, VMMC, and PrEP would reduce the HIV incidence rate by 46-67 %. CONCLUSIONS: The impacts of the WHO 2013 guidelines and the treat-all strategy were relatively close; their implementation is desirable to reduce HIV spread. Combining several strategies is promising in adult populations of hyperendemic areas but requires regular, reliable, and costly monitoring.
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  2. 2
    378771

    [Quality of life and its related factors among HIV/AIDS patients from HIV serodiscordant couples in Zhoukou of Henan province].

    Ma LP; Xu P; Sun DY; Li N; Yang WJ; Zhang L; Bai YJ; Ju LH; He HJ; Chen WY; Lyu P

    Zhonghua Yu Fang Yi Xue Za Zhi [Chinese Journal of Preventive Medicine]. 2016 Apr; 50(4):339-45.

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate the quality of life and its related factors among HIV/AIDS patients from HIV serodiscordant couples in Zhoukou city of Henan province. METHODS: During January to May in 2015, by the convenience sample, World Health Organization Quality of Life Questionnaire for Brief Version (WHOQOL-BREF) (Chinese version) and a self-edited questionnaire were used to investigate 1 251 HIV/AIDS patients who were confirmed with HIV positive by local CDC, registered in"HIV serodiscordant family" and agreed to participate in a face-to-face interview with above 18 year-old based on the local CDC , township hospitals and village clinics of 9 counties and 1 district of Zhoukou city, excluding the HIV/AIDS patients who were in divorce, death by one side, unknowing about his HIV status, with mental illness and disturbance of consciousness, incorrectly understanding the content of the questionnaire, and reluctant to participate in this study. The scores of quality of life of physical, psychological, social relations, and environmental domain were calculated. The related factors of the scores of different domains were analyzed by Multiple Two Classification Unconditioned Logistic Regression. RESULTS: The scores of investigation objects in the physical, psychological, social relations, and environmental domain were 12.00+/- 2.02, 12.07 +/- 2.07, 11.87 +/- 1.99, and 11.09 +/- 1.84, respectively. The multiple Unconditioned Logistic Regression analysis indicated that age <40 years, on ART and no other sickness in last two weeks were beneficial factors associated with physical domain with OR (95%CI): 0.61 (0.35-1.06), 0.52 (0.30-0.90), and 1.66 (1.09-2.52), respectively. The possibility of no poverty and no other sickness in last two weeks increased to 0.15(0.09-0.26) and 1.57(1.06-2.33) times of those who was in poverty and with other sickness in last two weeks in physical domain. The possibility of participants who were below 40 years old and with children increased to 0.58 (0.34-0.98) and 0.37 (0.23-0.57) times of who were above 40 years old and without children in psychological domain. The factors of with AIDS related symptoms, no children and with other sickness in last two week were found to be significantly associated with environmental domain with OR (95%CI): 0.65 (0.48-0.88), 0.66 (0.51-0.85), and 0.65 (0.51-0.84), respectively . CONCLUSION: The scores of every domain of quality of life in HIV serodiscordant couples of Zhoukou city were good. Age, whether having AIDS related symptoms, whether to accept ART , children, status of poverty, and whether suffering from other diseases in last two weeks were the main factors associated with the quality of life.
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  3. 3
    378627
    Peer Reviewed

    Breastmilk Output in a Disadvantaged Community with High HIV Prevalence as Determined by the Deuterium Oxide Dose-to-Mother Technique.

    Mulol H; Coutsoudis A

    Breastfeeding Medicine. 2016 Mar; 11(2):64-9.

    INTRODUCTION: World Health Organization breastfeeding guidelines for HIV-infected mothers are exclusive breastfeeding for 6 months and then continued breastfeeding for 12 months, provided the mother is receiving antiretroviral prophylaxis. Many African women perceive that breastmilk alone is not sufficient for their infant's nutritional requirements for the first 6 months of life, and mixed feeding is a common practice. METHODOLOGY: A stable isotope technique was used to determine breastmilk output volumes and maternal body composition objectively at five different time points in the first year of the infant's life. RESULTS: Breastmilk output volumes were high for HIV-infected mothers: 831 +/- 185 g/day at 6 weeks; 899 +/- 188 g/day at 3 months; 871 +/- 293 g/day at 6 months; 679 +/- 281 g/day at 9 months; and 755 +/- 287 g/day at 12 months. These high output volumes had no negative impact on the mother's fat-free mass. The breastmilk output volumes for HIV-uninfected mothers were not significantly different to the outputs for HIV-infected mothers at any of the time points (p > 0.05): 948 +/- 223 g/day at 6 weeks; 925 +/- 227 g/day at 3 months; 902 +/- 286 g/day at 6 months; 746 +/- 263 g/day at 9 months; and 713 +/- 264 g/day at 12 months. CONCLUSION: This study using objective methodology shows that breastmilk outputs of HIV-infected mothers were relatively high (and within published reference ranges), and mothers are able to provide sufficient breastmilk for their infants without compromising their own fat-free mass.
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  4. 4
    274078

    WHO draft guidelines for antiretroviral therapy in resource limited settings.

    Spacek LA

    Hopkins HIV Report. 2002 Jul; [6] p..

    The WHO guidelines are based on rigorous evaluation of data collected almost exclusively in developed countries. Of concern is whether guidelines created for HIV-infected populations of developed nations are adaptable to HIV-infected populations worldwide. Specifics regarding the presence of different HIV subtypes, endemic infections such as tuberculosis, genetic determinants, and other health measures such as nutritional status may introduce factors that alter response to treatment. Developing nations that have successfully implemented HAART include Brazil, Thailand, Senegal, and Uganda. Studies are needed to examine responses to HAART and whether changes to the guidelines would better serve populations in different regions around the world. For example, initiation of HAART earlier in the course of HIV disease may have an impact on disease outcomes due to endemic mycobacterial infections such as tuberculosis. With initiation of HAART on a population-wide scale, continuous surveillance of drug-resistant HIV will be needed to update treatment guidelines. A recent study conducted in Gabon demonstrated resistance to antiretroviral therapy. Of great concern is that antiviral drug resistance due to suboptimal therapies could limit the potency of available treatments. (excerpt)
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  5. 5
    189908
    Peer Reviewed

    WHO report says AIDS offers healthcare opportunity.

    Fleck F

    BMJ. British Medical Journal. 2004 Jan 3; 328:10.

    Dr Lee Jong-wook, director general of the World Health Organization, has said that the organisation’s goal of getting lifesaving antiretroviral drugs to three million patients with HIV or AIDS in the developing world by 2005 presents a golden opportunity to put in place desperately needed basic healthcare systems. In the preface to WHO’s annual report on global health Dr Lee said that funds for tackling the AIDS crisis could in turn establish lasting health systems for the future treatment and prevention of disease in the developing world. (excerpt)
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  6. 6
    188580
    Peer Reviewed

    WHO declares failure to deliver AIDS medicines a global health emergency.

    Bulletin of the World Health Organization. 2003 Oct; 81(10):776.

    At a special session of the United Nations General Assembly in New York on 22 September, WHO declared the failure to expand access to antiretrovirals in the developing world a global health emergency. The announcement was made together with UNAIDS and the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis & Malaria. (excerpt)
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  7. 7
    188572
    Peer Reviewed

    AIDS as a global emergency. [Le SIDA, une urgence mondiale]

    Farmer P

    Bulletin of the World Health Organization. 2003 Oct; 81(10):699.

    WHO’s new Director-General has just declared AIDS to be a global health emergency. This move is not unprecedented but does signal a welcome departure from business as usual. Can declarations change the world? They can if they lead to action commensurate with the problem. (excerpt)
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  8. 8
    187662
    Peer Reviewed

    Provision of treatment in HIV-1 vaccine trials in developing countries.

    Fitzgerald DW; Pape JW; Wasserheit JN; Counts GW; Corey L

    Lancet. 2003 Sep 20; 362(9388):993-994.

    Should volunteers who become HIV- 1 infected during the course of HIV-1 vaccine trials in developing countries be provided with antiretroviral therapy by investigators? Despite emotionally charged debate, consensus on this issue has not been reached. For example, UNAIDS ethics guidelines for HIV vaccine research do not set one standard of care, but rather provide an acceptable range between a minimum and the ideal. (excerpt)
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  9. 9
    187658

    WHO's 3-by-5 target [letter]

    Taylor K; DeYoung P

    Lancet. 2003 Sep 13; 362(9387):918.

    The table shows our rough calculations for the inputs that will be needed to reach the 3 million target. We have used statistics relevant to the most heavily affected region, sub-Saharan Africa, although other lower-prevalence regions may have better health infrastructure to implement interventions more rapidly. Our estimates only refer to interventions that lead to start of therapy, not to those needed for maintenance. We have done this rough calculation because there is a dearth of published experience about the large-scale effectiveness of interventions that move people through a process from awareness to action—i.e., for services to be in demand (WHO aims to ensure rates of 60% and 90% for accessibility of voluntary counselling and HIV testing and for AIDS education and services for youths by 2005). (excerpt)
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  10. 10
    187517

    Simplifying HIV therapeutics, and the global treatment of AIDS [editorial]

    Laurence J

    AIDS Reader. 2003 Jan; 13(1):5-6.

    In a special session of the United Nations, held from June 25 to 27, 2001, access to medications was recognized as one of the fundamental elements ensuring the innate right of all persons to enjoy the highest attainable standard of health. The prevention and treatment of HIV/AIDS were emphasized as "mutually reinforcing elements" of an effective health response. Yet, of the 43 million people currently living with HIV/AIDS, fewer than 1 million have access to and are treated with antiretrovirals. That fact has become part of a new public service campaign to increase awareness of this issue in the United States. (author's)
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  11. 11
    184996
    Peer Reviewed

    Prophylactic use of cotrimoxazole against opportunistic infections in HIV-positive patients: knowledge and practices of health care providers in Cote d'Ivoire.

    Brou H; Desgrees-Du-Lou A; Souville M; Moatti JP; Msellati P

    AIDS Care. 2003 Oct; 15(5):629-637.

    We present here the results of a survey conducted in Côte d’Ivoire, Africa, among health care providers, on the knowledge of prophylactic use of cotrimoxazole to prevent opportunistic infections in HIV-infected persons. The survey was conducted in 15 health centres, involved or not in the ‘initiative of access to treatment for HIV infected people’. Between December 1999 and March 2000, 145 physicians and 297 other health care providers were interviewed. In the analysis, the health centres were divided into three groups: health centres implicated in the initiative of access to treatment for HIV-infected people with a great deal of caring for HIV-infected people, health centres implicated in this initiative but caring for few HIV-infected people, and health centres not specifically involved in the care of HIV-infected people. Six per cent of physicians and 50% of other health care providers had never heard of cotrimoxazole prophylaxis. The level of information about this prophylaxis is related to the level of HIV-related activities in the health centre. Among health care providers informed, knowledge on the exact terms of prescription of the cotrimoxazole is poor. In conclusion, it appears that the recommendations for primary cotrimoxazole prophylaxis of HIV-infected people did not reach the whole health care provider population. Most physicians are informed but not other health workers, even if the latter are often the only contact of the patient with the health centre. The only medical staff correctly informed are the physicians already strongly engaged in the care of HIV-infected people. (author's)
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  12. 12
    180456

    What does budget 2003/4 allocate for HIV / AIDS?

    Hickey A

    AIDS Analysis Africa. 2003 Jun-Jul; 14(1):6-8.

    Given that Budget 2003/4 significantly steps up the amount of funds going to the provinces for HIV/AIDS, there are now two critical questions facing us. 1. Extra money for HIV/AIDS was put into the Equitable Share in Budget 2003/4. Will provinces use the additional funds in their equitable share grant to increase their provincial health budgets and boost funding to HIV/AIDS interventions? Or will those funds be diverted to other priorities as identified by individual provinces? 2. Will provinces be able to spend the added funds? Absorption is a real problem-provincial departments are already struggling with capacity in terms of lack of financial management and programme management skills, insufficient staff, or unfilled posts. This issue is not unique to HIV/AIDS but symptomatic of other social sector programmes. In essence, analysis of Budget 2003/4 suggests that--from a public finance perspective--the main challenge for government's response to HIV/AIDS in the foreseeable future is not going to be lack of financial resources, but the capacity to spend. (excerpt)
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