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Your search found 8 Results

  1. 1
    372475

    90-90-90. An ambitious treatment target to help end the AIDS epidemic.

    Joint United Nations Programme on HIV / AIDS [UNAIDS]

    Geneva, Switzerland, UNAIDS, Joint United Nations Programme on HIV/AIDS, 2014 Oct. 40 p.

    In December 2013, the UNAIDS Programme Coordinating Board called on UNAIDS to support country- and region-led efforts to establish new targets for HIV treatment scale-up beyond 2015. In response, stakeholder consultations on new targets have been held in all regions of the world. At the global level, stakeholders assembled in a variety of thematic consultations focused on civil society, laboratory medicine, paediatric HIV treatment, adolescents and other key issues. The 90-90-90 UNAIDS target seeks to: 1) By 2020, 90% of all people living with HIV will know their HIV status; 2) By 2020, 90% of all people with diagnosed HIV infection will receive sustained antiretroviral therapy; and 3) By 2020, 90% of all people receiving antiretroviral therapy will have viral suppression. Key points: 1) Governments, health experts and civil society must take advantage of the next five-year window to meet the 90-90-90 target to tackle AIDS; 2) Early treatment can reduce infection rates by 90 %; 3) A paradigm shift in HIV/AIDS treatment has seen average drug prices fall from an average of US$15 000 to US$ 80; and 4) Health systems will improve as a result of investment in HIV/AIDS treatment; financing from the international community is indispensable.
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  2. 2
    384217
    Peer Reviewed

    Working together to provide generics for health.

    Beck EJ; Reiss P

    Antiviral therapy. 2014; 19 Suppl 3:1.

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  3. 3
    384211
    Peer Reviewed

    Simplification of antiretroviral therapy: a necessary step in the public health response to HIV/AIDS in resource-limited settings.

    Vitoria M; Ford N; Doherty M; Flexner C

    Antiviral therapy. 2014; 19 Suppl 3:31-7.

    The global scale-up of antiretroviral therapy (ART) over the past decade represents one of the great public health and human rights achievements of recent times. Moving from an individualized treatment approach to a simplified and standardized public health approach has been critical to ART scale-up, simplifying both prescribing practices and supply chain management. In terms of the latter, the risk of stock-outs can be reduced and simplified prescribing practices support task shifting of care to nursing and other non-physician clinicians; this strategy is critical to increase access to ART care in settings where physicians are limited in number. In order to support such simplification, successive World Health Organization guidelines for ART in resource-limited settings have aimed to reduce the number of recommended options for first-line ART in such settings. Future drug and regimen choices for resource-limited settings will likely be guided by the same principles that have led to the recommendation of a single preferred regimen and will favour drugs that have the following characteristics: minimal risk of failure, efficacy and tolerability, robustness and forgiveness, no overlapping resistance in treatment sequencing, convenience, affordability, and compatibility with anti-TB and anti-hepatitis treatments.
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  4. 4
    381858
    Peer Reviewed

    Adoption of national recommendations related to use of antiretroviral therapy before and shortly following the launch of the 2013 WHO consolidated guidelines.

    Nelson LJ; Beusenberg M; Habiyambere V; Shaffer N; Vitoria MA; Montero RG; Easterbrook PJ; Doherty MC

    AIDS. 2014 Mar; 28 Suppl 2:S217-24.

    OBJECTIVE: To determine the status of key national policies on the use of antiretroviral therapy (ART) at the time of the launch of the 2013 WHO consolidated guidelines as well as to track early progress towards adoption of these recommendations following dissemination. DESIGN: Descriptive analysis of global data on baseline ART policies as of June 2013 and early intentions to adopt the 2013 WHO for use of antiretroviral drugs guidelines as of November 2013. METHODS: Compilation of existing global reports on key HIV policies, review of national guidelines, data collection through annual drug procurement surveys and through guidelines dissemination meetings in each of the six WHO regions. RESULTS: Data were available from 124 low- and middle-income countries, including 97% of the 57 high-priority countries that have been identified by WHO and the Joint United Nations Program on HIV/AIDS (UNAIDS). At baseline, only one country reported recommending antiretroviral therapy (ART) at a CD4 T-cell count 250 cells/mul or less for adults and adolescents in 2013, whereas nine countries already recommended using CD4 T-cell count 500 cells/mul or less. Recommendations for ART initiation regardless of CD4 T-cell count for HIV-infected patients with tuberculosis (86%), hepatitis B (75%), all HIV-infected women who were pregnant or breastfeeding (option B+: 40%) or HIV-infected persons in a serodiscordant relationship (26%) had been nationally adopted as of June 2013. Eight of 67 countries (12%) already recommended treating all children less than 5 years of age. The triple antiretroviral combination of tenofovir + lamivudine (or emtricitabine) + efavirenz was recommended as the preferred first-line option for adults and adolescents more frequently (51%) than for pregnant women (38%), or for both adults/adolescents and pregnant women (28%; P < 0.05). Fewer than half (37%) of all countries reported recommending lopinavir/ritonavir for all HIV-infected children less than 3 years of age; 54% of countries reported recommending routine viral load monitoring, whereas only 41% recommended nurse-initiated ART. CONCLUSIONS: A number of key WHO policy recommendations on antiretroviral drug use were adopted rapidly by countries in advance of or shortly following the launch of the 2013 guidelines. Efforts are needed to support and track ongoing policy adoption and ensure that it is accompanied by the scale-up of evidence-based interventions.
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  5. 5
    337270

    HIV and Ebola update.

    Joint United Nations Programme on HIV / AIDS [UNAIDS]

    Geneva, Switzerland, UNAIDS, 2014. [4] p. (Reference)

    It is essential that all people, including people living with HIV, are able to access health services and ongoing treatment. If people living with HIV who are on ART stop abruptly because they cannot access new supplies they could rapidly become unwell, drug resistance may build and the chances of onward transmission of the virus would increase. UNAIDS is working to mitigate the impact the EVD outbreak is having on access to treatment and care for people living with HIV and on new patient enrolment. In order to provide continuity of treatment to people on ART, community networks, supported by UNAIDS have been working with the National AIDS Councils to establish additional service delivery points. People on ART have been collecting their medicines from the offices of the National AIDS Councils and wherever possible, patients have been given supplies for longer periods than usual. UNAIDS is fully supporting United Nations Mission for Ebola Emergency Response (UNMEER) and the five pillar framework. UNAIDS country offices in each of the three countries, as well as the Regional Support Team in Dakar, are contributing to the Ebola operations centres, the national Ebola task forces or committees, the presidential Ebola task forces and other coordination mechanisms. (Excerpts)
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  6. 6
    337070

    Hormonal contraceptive methods for women at high risk of HIV and living with HIV. 2014 guidance statement. Recommendations concerning the use of hormonal contraceptive methods by women at high risk of HIV and women living with HIV.

    World Health Organization [WHO]

    Geneva, Switzerland, WHO, Department of Reproductive Health and Research, 2014. [16] p. (WHO/RHR/14.24)

    During 9-12 March 2014, the World Health Organization (WHO) convened a meeting of the Guideline Development Group (GDG) comprising 52 individuals representing a wide range of stakeholders, for the purpose of reviewing, and where appropriate, revising its Medical eligibility criteria for contraceptive use, fourth edition (MEC) guidance. Recommendations concerning the use of hormonal contraceptive methods by women at high risk of HIV and women living with HIV, including women taking antiretroviral therapy (ART), were among the many topics reviewed at this meeting. Given the public health importance of this topic, and at the encouragement of the GDG, the World Health Organization is issuing its contraceptive eligibility guidance for women at high risk of HIV and women living with HIV in advance of the entire guideline revision. It is anticipated that the revised fifth edition of the MEC will be completed in 2015. Recommendations for hormonal contraceptive use are provided for: women at high risk of HIV infection; women living with asymptomatic or mild HIV clinical disease (WHO stage 1 or 2); women living with severe or advanced HIV clinical disease (WHO stage 3 or 4); women living with HIV using antiretroviral therapy (ART). In addition to the recommendations themselves, this publication provides a description of the background and methods used in their development. An executive summary and information on dissemination and evaluation are also included. (Excerpts)
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  7. 7
    335970

    The gap report.

    Joint United Nations Programme on HIV / AIDS [UNAIDS]

    Geneva, Switzerland, UNAIDS, 2014 Jul. [422] p. (UNAIDS / JC2656)

    How do we close the gap between the people moving forward and the people being left behind? This was the question we set out to answer in the UNAIDS Gap report. Similar to the Global report, the goal of the Gap report is to provide the best possible data, but, in addition, to give information and analysis on the people being left behind. A new report by UNAIDS shows that 19 million of the 35 million people living with HIV globally do not know their HIV-positive status. The UNAIDS Gap report shows that as people find out their HIV-positive status they will seek life-saving treatment. In sub-Saharan Africa, almost 90% of people who tested positive for HIV went on to access antiretroviral therapy (ART). Research shows that in sub-Saharan Africa, 76% of people on ART have achieved viral suppression, whereby they are unlikely to transmit the virus to their sexual partners. New data analysis demonstrates that for every 10% increase in treatment coverage there is a 1% decline in the percentage of new infections among people living with HIV. The report highlights that efforts to increase access to ART are working. In 2013, an additional 2.3 million people gained access to the life-saving medicines. This brings the global number of people accessing ART to nearly 13 million by the end of 2013. Based on past scale-up, UNAIDS projects that as of July 2014 as many as 13 950 296 people were accessing ART. By ending the epidemic by 2030, the world would avert 18 million new HIV infections and 11.2 million AIDS-related deaths between 2013 and 2030.
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  8. 8
    335936

    Consolidated guidelines on HIV prevention, diagnosis, treatment and care for key populations.

    World Health Organization [WHO]

    Geneva, Switzerland, WHO, 2014 Jul. [184] p.

    In this new consolidated guidelines document on HIV prevention, diagnosis, treatment and care for key populations, the World Health Organization brings together all existing guidance relevant to five key populations -- men who have sex with men, people who inject drugs, people in prisons and other closed settings, sex workers and transgender people --and updates selected guidance and recommendations. These guidelines aim to: provide a comprehensive package of evidence-based HIV-related recommendations for all key populations; increase awareness of the needs of and issues important to key populations; improve access, coverage and uptake of effective and acceptable services; and catalyze greater national and global commitment to adequate funding and services.
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