Important: The POPLINE website will retire on September 1, 2019. Click here to read about the transition.

Your search found 79 Results

  1. 1
    392803
    Peer Reviewed

    Application opportunities of geographic information systems analysis to support achievement of the UNAIDS 90-90-90 targets in South Africa.

    Lilian RR; Grobbelaar CJ; Hurter T; McIntyre JA; Struthers HE; Peters RPH

    South African Medical Journal. 2017 Nov 27; 107(12):1065-1071.

    In an effort to achieve control of the HIV epidemic, 90-90-90 targets have been proposed whereby 90% of the HIV-infected population should know their status, 90% of those diagnosed should be receiving antiretroviral therapy, and 90% of those on treatment should be virologically suppressed. In this article we present approaches for using relatively simple geographic information systems (GIS) analyses of routinely available data to support HIV programme management towards achieving the 90-90-90 targets, with a focus on South Africa (SA) and other high-prevalence settings in low- and middle-income countries. We present programme-level GIS applications to map aggregated health data and individual-level applications to track distinct patients. We illustrate these applications using data from City of Johannesburg Region D, demonstrating that GIS has great potential to guide HIV programme operations and assist in achieving the 90-90-90 targets in SA.
    Add to my documents.
  2. 2
    391181
    Peer Reviewed

    The continuum of HIV care in South Africa: implications for achieving the second and third UNAIDS 90-90-90 targets.

    Takuva S; Brown AE; Pillay Y; Delpech V; Puren AJ

    AIDS. 2017 Feb 20; 31(4):545-552.

    BACKGROUND: We characterize engagement with HIV care in South Africa in 2012 to identify areas for improvement towards achieving global 90-90-90 targets. METHODS: Over 3.9 million CD4 cell count and 2.7 million viral load measurements reported in 2012 in the public sector were extracted from the national laboratory electronic database. The number of persons living with HIV (PLHIV), number and proportion in HIV care, on antiretroviral therapy (ART) and with viral suppression (viral load <400 copies/ml) were estimated and stratified by sex and age group. Modified Poisson regression approach was used to examine associations between sex, age group and viral suppression among persons on ART. RESULTS: We estimate that among 6511 000 PLHIV in South Africa in 2012, 3300 000 individuals (50.7%) accessed care and 32.9% received ART. Although viral suppression was 73.7% among the treated population in 2012, the overall percentage of persons with viral suppression among all PLHIV was 23.8%. Linkage to HIV care was lower among men (38.5%) than among women (57.2%). Overall, 47.1% of those aged 0-14 years and 47.0% of those aged 15-49 years were linked to care compared with 56.2% among those aged above 50 years. CONCLUSION: Around a quarter of all PLHIV have achieved viral suppression in South Africa. Men and younger persons have poorer linkage to HIV care. Expanding HIV testing, strengthening prompt linkage to care and further expansion of ART are needed for South Africa to reach the 90-90-90 target. Focus on these areas will reduce the transmission of new HIV infections and mortality in the general population.
    Add to my documents.
  3. 3
    379400
    Peer Reviewed

    National responses to global health targets: exploring policy transfer in the context of the UNAIDS '90-90-90' treatment targets in Ghana and Uganda.

    McRobie E; Matovu F; Nanyiti A; Nonvignon J; Abankwah DNY; Case KK; Hallett TB; Hanefeld J; Conteh L

    Health Policy and Planning. 2018 Jan 1; 33(1):17-33.

    Global health organizations frequently set disease-specific targets with the goal of eliciting adoption at the national-level; consideration of the influence of target setting on national policies, program and health budgets is of benefit to those setting targets and those intended to respond. In 2014, the Joint United Nations Program on HIV/AIDS set ‘ambitious’ treatment targets for country adoption: 90% of HIV-positive persons should know their status; 90% of those on treatment; 90% of those achieving viral suppression. Using case studies from Ghana and Uganda, we explore how the target and its associated policy content have been adopted at the national level. That is whether adoption is in rhetoric only or supported by program, policy or budgetary changes. We review 23 (14 from Ghana, 9 from Uganda) national policy, operational and strategic documents for the HIV response and assess commitments to ‘90-90-90’. In-person semi-structured interviews were conducted with purposively sampled key informants (17 in Ghana, 20 in Uganda) involved in program-planning and resource allocation within HIV to gain insight into factors facilitating adoption of 90-90-90. Interviews were transcribed and analyzed thematically, inductively and deductively, guided by pre-existing policy theories, including Dolowitz and Marsh’s policy transfer framework to describe features of the transfer and the Global Health Advocacy and Policy Project framework to explain observations. Regardless of notable resource constraints, transfer of the 90-90-90 targets was evident beyond rhetoric with substantial shifts in policy and programme activities. In both countries, there was evidence of attempts to minimize resource constraints by seeking programme efficiencies, prioritization of program activities and devising domestic financing mechanisms; however, significant resource gaps persist. An effective health network, comprised of global and local actors, mediated the adoption and adaptation, facilitating a shift in the HIV program from ‘business as usual’ to approaches targeting geographies and populations.
    Add to my documents.
  4. 4
    375638

    Ending AIDS: Progress towards the 90-90-90 targets. Global AIDS update -- 2017.

    Joint United Nations Programme on HIV / AIDS [UNAIDS]

    Geneva, Switzerland, UNAIDS, 2017. 198 p. (UNAIDS/JC2900E)

    Since they were launched at the 20th International AIDS Conference in Melbourne, Australia, in 2014, the 90-90-90 targets have become a central pillar of the global quest to end the AIDS epidemic. The targets reflect a fundamental shift in the world’s approach to HIV treatment, moving it away from a focus on the number of people accessing antiretroviral therapy and towards the importance of maximising viral suppression among people living with HIV. This shift was driven by greater understanding of the benefits of viral suppression -- not only does treatment protect people living with HIV from AIDS-related illness, but it also greatly lowers the risk of transmitting the virus to others.
    Add to my documents.
  5. 5
    377423
    Peer Reviewed

    Population-level impact of an accelerated HIV response plan to reach the UNAIDS 90-90-90 target in Cote d'Ivoire: Insights from mathematical modeling.

    Maheu-Giroux M; Vesga JF; Diabate S; Alary M; Baral S; Diouf D; Abo K; Boily MC

    PLoS Medicine. 2017 Jun; 14(6):e1002321.

    BACKGROUND: National responses will need to be markedly accelerated to achieve the ambitious target of the Joint United Nations Programme on HIV/AIDS (UNAIDS). This target aims for 90% of HIV-positive individuals to be aware of their status, for 90% of those aware to receive antiretroviral therapy (ART), and for 90% of those on treatment to have a suppressed viral load by 2020, with each individual target reaching 95% by 2030. We aimed to estimate the impact of various treatment-as-prevention scenarios in Cote d'Ivoire, one of the countries with the highest HIV incidence in West Africa, with unmet HIV prevention and treatment needs, and where key populations are important to the broader HIV epidemic. METHODS AND FINDINGS: An age-stratified dynamic model was developed and calibrated to epidemiological and programmatic data using a Bayesian framework. The model represents sexual and vertical HIV transmission in the general population, female sex workers (FSW), and men who have sex with men (MSM). We estimated the impact of scaling up interventions to reach the UNAIDS targets, as well as the impact of 8 other scenarios, on HIV transmission in adults and children, compared to our baseline scenario that maintains 2015 rates of testing, ART initiation, ART discontinuation, treatment failure, and levels of condom use. In 2015, we estimated that 52% (95% credible intervals: 46%-58%) of HIV-positive individuals were aware of their status, 72% (57%-82%) of those aware were on ART, and 77% (74%-79%) of those on ART were virologically suppressed. Reaching the UNAIDS targets on time would avert 50% (42%-60%) of new HIV infections over 2015-2030 compared to 30% (25%-36%) if the 90-90-90 target is reached in 2025. Attaining the UNAIDS targets in FSW, their clients, and MSM (but not in the rest of the population) would avert a similar fraction of new infections (30%; 21%-39%). A 25-percentage-point drop in condom use from the 2015 levels among FSW and MSM would reduce the impact of reaching the UNAIDS targets, with 38% (26%-51%) of infections averted. The study's main limitation is that homogenous spatial coverage of interventions was assumed, and future lines of inquiry should examine how geographical prioritization could affect HIV transmission. CONCLUSIONS: Maximizing the impact of the UNAIDS targets will require rapid scale-up of interventions, particularly testing, ART initiation, and limiting ART discontinuation. Reaching clients of FSW, as well as key populations, can efficiently reduce transmission. Sustaining the high condom-use levels among key populations should remain an important prevention pillar.
    Add to my documents.
  6. 6
    375274

    Get on the fast-track. The life-cycle approach to HIV. Finding solutions for everyone at every stage of life.

    Joint United Nations Programme on HIV / AIDS [UNAIDS]

    Geneva, Switzerland, UNAIDS, 2016. 140 p.

    In this report, UNAIDS is announcing that 18.2 million people now have access to HIV treatment. The Fast-Track response is working. Increasing treatment coverage is reducing AIDS-related deaths among adults and children. But the life-cycle approach has to include more than just treatment. Tuberculosis (TB) remains among the commonest causes of illness and death among people living with HIV of all ages, causing about one third of AIDS-related deaths in 2015. These deaths could and should have been prevented. TB, like cervical cancer, hepatitis C and other major causes of illness and death among people living with HIV, is not always detected in HIV services. It is vital that we collaborate closely with other health programmes to prevent unnecessary deaths. The impact of better treatment coverage means that a growing number of people will be living with HIV into old age, while there has also been an increase in new HIV infections among older people. The consequences of long-term antiretroviral therapy, combined with the diseases of ageing, will be new territory for many HIV programmes. Drug resistance is a major threat to the AIDS response, not just for antiretroviral medicines but also for the antibiotic and antituberculous medicines that people living with HIV frequently need to remain healthy. More people than ever before are in need of second- and third-line medicines for HIV and TB. The human burden of drug resistance is already unacceptable; the financial costs will soon be unsustainable. We need to make sure the medicines we have today are put to best use, and accelerate and expand the search for new treatments, diagnostics, vaccines and an HIV cure. As we build on science and innovation we will need fresh thinking to get us over the remaining obstacles. The cliché is true -- what got us here, won’t get us there. We face persistent inequalities, the threat of fewer resources and a growing conspiracy of complacency. (Excerpt)
    Add to my documents.
  7. 7
    340425

    Prevention gap report.

    Joint United Nations Programme on HIV / AIDS [UNAIDS]

    Geneva, Switzerland, UNAIDS, 2016. [286] p.

    Efforts to reach fewer than 500 000 new HIV infections by 2020 are off track. This simple conclusion sits atop a complex and diverse global tapestry. Data from 146 countries show that some have achieved declines in new HIV infections among adults of 50% or more over the last 10 years, while many others have not made measurable progress, and yet others have experienced worrying increases in new HIV infections.
    Add to my documents.
  8. 8
    372475

    90-90-90. An ambitious treatment target to help end the AIDS epidemic.

    Joint United Nations Programme on HIV / AIDS [UNAIDS]

    Geneva, Switzerland, UNAIDS, Joint United Nations Programme on HIV/AIDS, 2014 Oct. 40 p.

    In December 2013, the UNAIDS Programme Coordinating Board called on UNAIDS to support country- and region-led efforts to establish new targets for HIV treatment scale-up beyond 2015. In response, stakeholder consultations on new targets have been held in all regions of the world. At the global level, stakeholders assembled in a variety of thematic consultations focused on civil society, laboratory medicine, paediatric HIV treatment, adolescents and other key issues. The 90-90-90 UNAIDS target seeks to: 1) By 2020, 90% of all people living with HIV will know their HIV status; 2) By 2020, 90% of all people with diagnosed HIV infection will receive sustained antiretroviral therapy; and 3) By 2020, 90% of all people receiving antiretroviral therapy will have viral suppression. Key points: 1) Governments, health experts and civil society must take advantage of the next five-year window to meet the 90-90-90 target to tackle AIDS; 2) Early treatment can reduce infection rates by 90 %; 3) A paradigm shift in HIV/AIDS treatment has seen average drug prices fall from an average of US$15 000 to US$ 80; and 4) Health systems will improve as a result of investment in HIV/AIDS treatment; financing from the international community is indispensable.
    Add to my documents.
  9. 9
    370754
    Peer Reviewed

    How should the post-2015 response to AIDS relate to the drive for universal health coverage?

    Poku NK

    Global Public Health. 2016 Aug 6; 1-15.

    The drive for universal health coverage (UHC) now has a great deal of normative impetus, and in combination with the inauguration of the sustainable development goals, has come to be regarded as a means of ensuring the financial basis for the struggle against HIV and AIDS. The argument of this paper is that such thinking is a case of ‘the right thing at the wrong time’: it seriously underestimates the scale of the work against HIV and AIDS, and the speed with which we need to undertake it, if we are to consolidate the gains we have made to date, let alone reduce it to manageable proportions. The looming ‘fiscal crunch’ makes the challenges all the more daunting; even in the best circumstances, the time required to establish UHCs capable of providing both essential health services and a very rapid scale-up of the fight against HIV and AIDS is insufficient when set against the urgency of ensuring that AIDS does not eventuate as a global health catastrophe.
    Add to my documents.
  10. 10
    340372

    90-90-90. On the right track towards the global target.

    Joint United Nations Programme on HIV / AIDS [UNAIDS]

    Geneva, Switzerland, UNAIDS, 2016. [62] p.

    This report highlights best practices and provides examples of countries that are already coming close to achieving the 90–90–90 targets, which are that 90% of people living with HIV know their HIV status, 90% of people who know their HIV-positive status are accessing treatment and 90% of people on treatment have suppressed viral loads. The report outlines steps that are needed to expedite gains towards each of the three 90s. Technological and service delivery innovations rapidly need to be brought to scale, communities must be empowered to lead the push to end the epidemic, new resources must be mobilized to reach the final mile of the response to HIV and steps must urgently be taken to eliminate social and structural barriers to service access.
    Add to my documents.
  11. 11
    340327

    Fast-track update on investments needed in the AIDS response.

    Joint United Nations Programme on HIV / AIDS [UNAIDS]

    Geneva, Switzerland, UNAIDS, 2016. [20] p. (UNAIDS/JC2842/E)

    This document gives an update on progress in the Fast-Track Strategy, adopted by the UNAIDS Programme Coordinating Board in October 2015. This strategy sets HIV service coverage targets that must be achieved by 2020 to build sufficient momentum to overcome one of history's greatest public health threats by 2030. For example: Providing antiretroviral therapy (ART) to an additional 12 million people living with HIV in 2020. This will require reaching key populations with a comprehensive package of HIV services. Increasing investment in HIV programs from an estimated USD$19.2 billion in 2014 to USD$26.2 billion by 2020. After 2020, the vast majority of people living with HIV will have been diagnosed. Because of this and other factors, the resources needed for HIV will then steadily decrease to USD$22.3 billion in 2030. Increasing investment in outreach to key populations in low- and middle-income countries for HIV prevention and linkage to HIV testing and treatment. This investment should grow to about 7.2 percent of total investment by 2020, and the estimated resources needed for community-based delivery of ART percent should grow to about 3.8 percent of total investment. The report also states that international assistance should continue to focus on low-income countries, which are less able to fund their HIV response.
    Add to my documents.
  12. 12
    340822

    AIDS by the numbers, 2015.

    Joint United Nations Programme on HIV / AIDS [UNAIDS]

    Geneva, Switzerland, UNAIDS, 2015. [12] p.

    This document, released on the World AIDS Day 2015, provides an update on the global status of the HIV epidemic. According to the press release, the epidemic has been forced into decline. New HIV infections and AIDS-related deaths have fallen dramatically since the peak of the epidemic. The document cites a 35 percent decrease in new HIV infections; a 42 percent decrease in AIDS-related deaths since the peak in 2004; a 58 percent decrease in new HIV infections among children since 2000; and an 84 percent increase in access to antiretroviral therapy since 2010. Additionally, the global response to HIV has averted 30 million new HIV infections and 7.8 million AIDS-related deaths since 2000. While acknowledging these achievements, the report also emphasizes that accelerating the AIDS response in low-and middle-income countries could avert 28 million new HIV infections and 21 million AIDS-related deaths between 2015 and 2030, saving US$24 billion annually in additional HIV treatment costs. The next phase of the global response must accommodate new circumstances, opportunities, and evidence, including a rapidly shifting context and a new, sustainable development agenda. The single priority of the HIV response for the next 15 years is to end the epidemic by 2030.
    Add to my documents.
  13. 13
    384217
    Peer Reviewed

    Working together to provide generics for health.

    Beck EJ; Reiss P

    Antiviral therapy. 2014; 19 Suppl 3:1.

    Add to my documents.
  14. 14
    337270

    HIV and Ebola update.

    Joint United Nations Programme on HIV / AIDS [UNAIDS]

    Geneva, Switzerland, UNAIDS, 2014. [4] p. (Reference)

    It is essential that all people, including people living with HIV, are able to access health services and ongoing treatment. If people living with HIV who are on ART stop abruptly because they cannot access new supplies they could rapidly become unwell, drug resistance may build and the chances of onward transmission of the virus would increase. UNAIDS is working to mitigate the impact the EVD outbreak is having on access to treatment and care for people living with HIV and on new patient enrolment. In order to provide continuity of treatment to people on ART, community networks, supported by UNAIDS have been working with the National AIDS Councils to establish additional service delivery points. People on ART have been collecting their medicines from the offices of the National AIDS Councils and wherever possible, patients have been given supplies for longer periods than usual. UNAIDS is fully supporting United Nations Mission for Ebola Emergency Response (UNMEER) and the five pillar framework. UNAIDS country offices in each of the three countries, as well as the Regional Support Team in Dakar, are contributing to the Ebola operations centres, the national Ebola task forces or committees, the presidential Ebola task forces and other coordination mechanisms. (Excerpts)
    Add to my documents.
  15. 15
    335970

    The gap report.

    Joint United Nations Programme on HIV / AIDS [UNAIDS]

    Geneva, Switzerland, UNAIDS, 2014 Jul. [422] p. (UNAIDS / JC2656)

    How do we close the gap between the people moving forward and the people being left behind? This was the question we set out to answer in the UNAIDS Gap report. Similar to the Global report, the goal of the Gap report is to provide the best possible data, but, in addition, to give information and analysis on the people being left behind. A new report by UNAIDS shows that 19 million of the 35 million people living with HIV globally do not know their HIV-positive status. The UNAIDS Gap report shows that as people find out their HIV-positive status they will seek life-saving treatment. In sub-Saharan Africa, almost 90% of people who tested positive for HIV went on to access antiretroviral therapy (ART). Research shows that in sub-Saharan Africa, 76% of people on ART have achieved viral suppression, whereby they are unlikely to transmit the virus to their sexual partners. New data analysis demonstrates that for every 10% increase in treatment coverage there is a 1% decline in the percentage of new infections among people living with HIV. The report highlights that efforts to increase access to ART are working. In 2013, an additional 2.3 million people gained access to the life-saving medicines. This brings the global number of people accessing ART to nearly 13 million by the end of 2013. Based on past scale-up, UNAIDS projects that as of July 2014 as many as 13 950 296 people were accessing ART. By ending the epidemic by 2030, the world would avert 18 million new HIV infections and 11.2 million AIDS-related deaths between 2013 and 2030.
    Add to my documents.
  16. 16
    335339

    Global report: UNAIDS report on the global AIDS epidemic 2013.

    Joint United Nations Programme on HIV / AIDS [UNAIDS]

    Geneva, Switzerland, UNAIDS, 2013. [198] p.

    The 2013 report on the global AIDS epidemic contains the latest data on numbers of new HIV infections, numbers of people receiving antiretroviral treatment, AIDS-related deaths and HIV among children. This report, which follows the endorsement of the 2011 United Nations Political Declaration on HIV and AIDS outlining global targets to achieve by 2015, summarizes progress towards 10 key targets and reviews commitments and future steps. While recognizing significant achievements, UNAIDS warns of slowing progress in meeting some targets. In 2012, there were 35 million people living with HIV (PLHIV), and 2.3 million new infections-a 33 percent decrease from 2001, including significant reductions in new infections among children. More people than ever are on antiretroviral therapy (ART). Twenty-six countries have achieved the global target of halving sexual HIV transmission by 2015, but other countries are not on track to meet this target, hence the need to enhance prevention efforts. Globally, countries have made limited progress in reducing HIV transmission by 50 percent among people who inject drugs. While ART coverage is high, and approaching the target of 15 million PLHIV on treatment, coverage in low- and middle-income countries represented only 34 percent of 28 million eligible PLHIV in 2013. Stigma, discrimination and criminalization towards PLHIV continue; specifically, 60 percent of countries report laws that inhibit access to HIV services by key populations. The results of this report should be used by countries to refocus and maintain their commitments. The authors urged strengthened global commitment to achieve the goal of zero new HIV infections, discrimination, and AIDS-related deaths.
    Add to my documents.
  17. 17
    334436

    HIV / AIDS white paper, World Youth Alliance.

    Grizzle M

    New York, New York, World Youth Alliance, [2012]. [25] p.

    The World Youth Alliance’s White Paper on HIV / AIDS proposes evidence-based and person-centered treatment, such as the provision of antiretroviral drugs, and prevention strategies, such as a reduction in concurrent partners and a delay in sexual debut. These strategies reflect the capacity of the person to make responsible decisions and to stop the high-risk behavior that exposes him or her to HIV. The paper ends with an evaluation of UNAIDS' harm reduction strategies and a call for UNAIDS to start emphasizing a person-centered response that reflects science and culture.
    Add to my documents.
  18. 18
    333445

    World AIDS Day report, 2011.

    Joint United Nations Programme on HIV / AIDS [UNAIDS]

    Geneva, Switzerland, UNAIDS, 2011. [52] p.

    A new report by the Joint United Nations Programme on HIV / AIDS (UNAIDS), released on 21 November, shows that 2011 was a game changing year for the AIDS response with unprecedented progress in science, political leadership and results. The report also shows that new HIV infections and AIDS-related deaths have fallen to the lowest levels since the peak of the epidemic.
    Add to my documents.
  19. 19
    333447

    UNAIDS data tables, 2011.

    Joint United Nations Programme on HIV / AIDS [UNAIDS]

    Geneva, Switzerland, UNAIDS, 2011. [36] p.

    The data tables describe in greater detail the progress being made against the HIV epidemic and the main challenges to achieving zero HIV infections and zero AIDS deaths. The data are drawn from country progress reports and will be updated regularly. This document reflects information found in the publication “Global HIV / AIDS response: epidemic update and health sector progress towards universal access: progress report 2011", by UNAIDS, UNICEF and WHO.
    Add to my documents.
  20. 20
    333337

    Getting to zero: 2011-2015 strategy, Joint United Nations Programme on HIV / AIDS (UNAIDS).

    Joint United Nations Programme on HIV / AIDS [UNAIDS]

    Geneva, Switzerland, UNAIDS, 2010 Dec. [64] p. (UNAIDS/10.12E/JC2034E)

    This Strategy has been developed through wide consultation, informed by the best evidence and driven by a moral imperative to achieve universal access to HIV prevention, treatment, care and support and the Millennium Development Goals.
    Add to my documents.
  21. 21
    333338

    Global report: UNAIDS report on the global AIDS epidemic 2010.

    Joint United Nations Programme on HIV / AIDS [UNAIDS]

    Geneva, Switzerland, UNAIDS, 2010. [364] p. (UNAIDS/10.11E ; JC1958E)

    The 2010 edition of the UNAIDS Report on the global AIDS epidemic includes new country by country scorecards on key issues facing the AIDS response. Based on the latest data from 182 countries, this global reference book provides comprehensive analysis on the AIDS epidemic and response. For the first time the report includes trend data on incidence from more than 60 countries.
    Add to my documents.
  22. 22
    333333

    Outlook 30. UNAIDS outlook report 2011.

    Joint United Nations Programme on HIV / AIDS [UNAIDS]

    Geneva, Switzerland, UNAIDS, 2011. [236] p.

    30 years into the AIDS epidemic, 30 milestones, thoughts, images, words, artworks, breakthroughs, inspirations, and ideas in response.
    Add to my documents.
  23. 23
    333332

    Global Plan towards the Elimination of New HIV Infections among Children by 2015 and Keeping their Mothers Alive. 2011-2015.

    Joint United Nations Programme on HIV / AIDS [UNAIDS]

    Geneva, Switzerland, UNAIDS, 2011. [48] p. (UNAIDS/ JC2137E)

    This Global Plan provides the foundation for country-led movement towards the elimination of new HIV infections among children and keeping their mothers alive. The Global Plan was developed through a consultative process by a high level Global Task Team convened by UNAIDS. It brought together 25 countries and 30 civil society, private sector, networks of people living with HIV and international organizations to chart a roadmap to achieving this goal by 2015.
    Add to my documents.
  24. 24
    333326

    The Treatment 2.0 Framework for Action: Catalysing the next phase of treatment, care and support.

    World Health Organization [WHO]; Joint United Nations Programme on HIV / AIDS [UNAIDS]

    Geneva, Switzerland, WHO, 2011. [32] p.

    In June 2010, the UNAIDS Secretariat and WHO launched Treatment 2.0, an initiative designed to achieve and sustain universal access and maximize the preventive benefits of antiretroviral therapy (ART). Treatment 2.0 builds on '3 by 5' and the programmatic and clinical evidence and experience over the last 10 years to expand access to HIV diagnosis, treatment and care through a series of innovations in five priority work areas: drugs, diagnostics, costs, service delivery and community mobilization. The principles and priorities of Treatment 2.0 address the need for innovation and efficiency gains in HIV programmes, in greater effectiveness, intervention coverage and impact in terms of both HIV-specific and broader health outcomes. Since the launch of Treatment 2.0, the UNAIDS Secretariat and WHO have worked with other UNAIDS co-sponsoring organizations, technical experts and global partners to further elaborate and begin implementing Treatment 2.0. The Treatment 2.0 Framework for Action outlines the five priority work areas which comprise the core elements of the initiative and establishes a strategic framework to guide action within each of them over the next decade. The Framework for Action reflects commitments outlined in Getting to Zero: 2011 - 2015 Strategy, UNAIDS and the WHO Global Health-Sector Strategy on HIV, 2011 - 2015, the guiding strategies for the multi-sectoral and health-sector responses to the HIV pandemic. (Excerpt)
    Add to my documents.
  25. 25
    333325

    HIV in Asia and the Pacific: Getting to zero.

    Joint United Nations Programme on HIV / AIDS [UNAIDS]. Regional Support for Asia and the Pacific

    Bangkok, Thailand, UNAIDS, Regional Support for Asia and the Pacific, 2011. [144] p. (UNAIDS / 11.05E)

    This report provides the most up to date information on the HIV epidemic in the region in 2011. While the region has seen impressive gains -- including a 20% drop in new HIV infections since 2001 and a three-fold increase in access to antiretroviral therapy since 2006 -- progress is threatened by an inadequate focus on key populations at higher risk of HIV infection and insufficient funding from both domestic and international sources.
    Add to my documents.

Pages