Important: The POPLINE website will retire on September 1, 2019. Click here to read about the transition.

Your search found 4 Results

  1. 1
    335339

    Global report: UNAIDS report on the global AIDS epidemic 2013.

    Joint United Nations Programme on HIV / AIDS [UNAIDS]

    Geneva, Switzerland, UNAIDS, 2013. [198] p.

    The 2013 report on the global AIDS epidemic contains the latest data on numbers of new HIV infections, numbers of people receiving antiretroviral treatment, AIDS-related deaths and HIV among children. This report, which follows the endorsement of the 2011 United Nations Political Declaration on HIV and AIDS outlining global targets to achieve by 2015, summarizes progress towards 10 key targets and reviews commitments and future steps. While recognizing significant achievements, UNAIDS warns of slowing progress in meeting some targets. In 2012, there were 35 million people living with HIV (PLHIV), and 2.3 million new infections-a 33 percent decrease from 2001, including significant reductions in new infections among children. More people than ever are on antiretroviral therapy (ART). Twenty-six countries have achieved the global target of halving sexual HIV transmission by 2015, but other countries are not on track to meet this target, hence the need to enhance prevention efforts. Globally, countries have made limited progress in reducing HIV transmission by 50 percent among people who inject drugs. While ART coverage is high, and approaching the target of 15 million PLHIV on treatment, coverage in low- and middle-income countries represented only 34 percent of 28 million eligible PLHIV in 2013. Stigma, discrimination and criminalization towards PLHIV continue; specifically, 60 percent of countries report laws that inhibit access to HIV services by key populations. The results of this report should be used by countries to refocus and maintain their commitments. The authors urged strengthened global commitment to achieve the goal of zero new HIV infections, discrimination, and AIDS-related deaths.
    Add to my documents.
  2. 2
    333337

    Getting to zero: 2011-2015 strategy, Joint United Nations Programme on HIV / AIDS (UNAIDS).

    Joint United Nations Programme on HIV / AIDS [UNAIDS]

    Geneva, Switzerland, UNAIDS, 2010 Dec. [64] p. (UNAIDS/10.12E/JC2034E)

    This Strategy has been developed through wide consultation, informed by the best evidence and driven by a moral imperative to achieve universal access to HIV prevention, treatment, care and support and the Millennium Development Goals.
    Add to my documents.
  3. 3
    331805

    A practical guide to integrating reproductive health and HIV / AIDS into grant proposals to the Global Fund.

    Hardee K; Gay J; Dunn-Georgiou E

    [Washington, D.C.], Population Action International, 2009 Sep. 61 p.

    Starting in recent proposal rounds, The Global Fund for AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria (GFATM) has stated more explicitly that countries can include reproductive health as part of their proposals on AIDS, tuberculosis and malaria, as long as a justification is provided on the impact of reproductive health (RH) on reducing one of the three diseases. This document is for countries and organizations, including CCMs, government and nongovernmental organizations and civil society organizations, to help in integrating reproductive health, including family planning (RH) and HIV / AIDS in proposals submitted to the Global Fund. The document takes a country approach to integration since the Global Fund seeks to support proposals that build on and strengthen national programs. (Excerpt)
    Add to my documents.
  4. 4
    309713

    HIV and AIDS treatment education: a critical component of efforts to ensure universal access to prevention, treatment and care. UNAIDS Inter-Agency Task Team (IATT) on Education.

    Sass J; Castle C

    Paris, France, UNESCO, 2006 Jun. 50 p. (ED.2006/WS/11309713)

    This paper explores some of the issues contained within the definition of treatment education, signalling ways that the education sector can play a role along with others engaged in treatment access and education. It considers some key strategies, including how to effectively engage and prepare communities and how to involve key constituencies, particularly people with HIV and those on treatment. Moreover, the paper reexamines the harmful effects of stigma and discrimination and how these impede progress in prevention as well as expanded treatment access. The paper also suggests some possible future directions, underscoring areas of particular priority. These include the need for: Identification, documentation and wide dissemination of effective approaches to treatment education that are feasible, sustainable and that can be scaled up; Development of practical guidelines and materials that can be used by programme implementers to support the integration of treatment education within ongoing HIV and AIDS education efforts; Ongoing and close communication with authorities and organizations responsible for expanding treatment access to ensure coherent and well-coordinated programming. (excerpt)
    Add to my documents.