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Your search found 4 Results

  1. 1
    316242
    Peer Reviewed

    Reaching the targets for tuberculosis control: the impact of HIV.

    Laserson KF; Wells CD

    Bulletin of the World Health Organization. 2007 May; 85(5):325-420.

    In 1991, the 44th World Health Assembly set two key targets for global tuberculosis (TB) control to be reached by 2000: 70% case detection of acid-fast bacilli smear-positive TB patients under the DOTS strategy recommended by WHO and 85% treatment success of those detected. This paper describes how TB control was scaled up to achieve these targets; it also considers the barriers encountered in reaching the targets, with a particular focus on how HIV infection affects TB control. Strong TB control will be facilitated by scaling-up WHO-recommended TB/HIV collaborative activities and by improving coordination between HIV and TB control programmes; in particular, to ensure control of drug-resistant TB. Required activities include more HIV counselling and testing of TB patients, greater use and acceptance of isoniazid as a preventive treatment in HIV-infected individuals, screening for active TB in HIV-care settings, and provision of universal access to antiretroviral treatment for all HIV-infected individuals eligible for such treatment. Integration of TB and HIV services in all facilities (i.e. in HIV-care settings and in TB clinics), especially at the periphery, is needed to effectively treat those infected with both diseases, to prolong their survival and to maximize limited human resources. Global TB targets can be met, particularly if there is renewed attention to TB/HIV collaborative activities combined with tremendous political commitment and will. (author's)
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  2. 2
    285603

    Sources and prices of selected medicines and diagnostics for people living with HIV / AIDS.

    UNICEF; Joint United Nations Programme on HIV / AIDS [UNAIDS]; World Health Organization [WHO]; Medecins Sans Frontières. Campaign for Access to Essential Medicines

    Geneva, Switzerland, WHO, 2004 Jun. [167] p. (WHO/EDM/PAR/2004.4; Development Experience Clearinghouse DocID / Order No. PN-ADB-693)

    Antiretroviral therapy, prevention and treatment of opportunistic infections and cancers, as well as palliative care are important elements of HIV/AIDS care and support. HIV/AIDS care hence requires a wide range of essential medicines. If available, these effective and often relatively inexpensive medicines can prevent, treat, or help manage HIV/AIDS and most of the common HIV-related diseases. Less than 8% of people who require antiretroviral (ARV) treatment can access these medicines in developing countries. The high price of many of the HIV-related medicines and diagnostics offered by common suppliers – especially antiretroviral and anti-cancer medicines – is one of the main barriers to their availability in developing countries. There are several other important barriers, including a lack of the basic components required for care, treatment, and support of people living with HIV/AIDS (PLWA) such as: trained staff in health facilities, constant availability of laboratory equipment and supplies, sufficient funding, efficient pharmaceutical services, strong political will and government commitment. Wider availability of information on prices and reliable sources of medicines can help those responsible for procurement make better decisions. Since 2000, prices of important first-line ARVs have fallen considerably. This trend is attributable to a cumulation of factors including advocacy, corporate responsiveness, competition from generic manufacturers, sustained public pressure, and the growing political attention paid to the AIDS epidemic. In addition, originator companies began announcing discount offers for the benefit of the poorest countries or those where HIV/AIDS prevalence is highest. (excerpt)
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  3. 3
    192086

    A guide for patients, family members and community caregivers. Caregiver booklet.

    World Health Organization [WHO]. Integrated Management of Adolescent and Adult Illness [IMAI]

    Geneva, Switzerland, WHO, [2003]. 47 p.

    The Caregiver Booklet is designed to help patients, family members, and community caregivers in the home-based care of serious long term illness. Home care is best for many people with long term illnesses, including those who are close to the end of life. All patients being cared for at home should be first assessed and treated by a health worker, who will help caregivers provide high quality home care and ensure that medicines are taken correctly. This booklet explains how to: 1. Deal with specific symptoms. 2. Provide care for terminal and bedridden patients at home. 3. Decide when to seek help from a health facility. The booklet should be given to the patient or caregiver and its contents explained by a nurse or community worker. The first section of the booklet covers ways to prevent problems from occuring and should be followed in all patients. The second section explains how to treat specific symptoms that may occur. (excerpt)
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  4. 4
    189406
    Peer Reviewed

    The untapped potential of palliative care for AIDS.

    Lancet. 2003 Nov 29; 362(9398):1773.

    December 1 is the 16th World AIDS Day. The major theme of the past year has been on strengthening the campaign for cheap antiretroviral drugs. This thrust, some critics maintain, has been to the detriment of HIV prevention efforts. Perhaps the most ambitious HIV/AIDS development in the past year has been WHO’s focus on the “3 by 5” target—a commitment to provide antiretroviral drugs to 3 million people in developing countries by the end of 2005. For many the “3 by 5” initiative, if successfully implemented, will bring a longer life. But how useful is this and other antiretroviral-based initiatives to those people with AIDS in the developing world who will die today, tomorrow, or in the very near future? For these people, the stark reality is that it is too late for antiretroviral treatment; what they need, yet rarely receive, is palliative care. (excerpt)
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