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  1. 1
    321022
    Peer Reviewed

    Global Fund-supported programmes' contribution to international targets and the Millennium Development Goals: An initial analysis.

    Komatsu R; Low-Beer D; Schwartlander B

    Bulletin of the World Health Organization. 2007 Oct; 85(10):805-811.

    The Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria is one of the largest funders to fight these diseases. This paper discusses the programmatic contribution of Global Fund-supported programmes towards achieving international targets and Millennium Development Goals, using data from Global Fund grants. Results until June 2006 of 333 grants supported by the Global Fund in 127 countries were aggregated and compared against international targets for HIV/AIDS, tuberculosis and malaria. Progress reports to the Global Fund secretariat were used as a basis to calculate results. Service delivery indicators for antiretrovirals (ARV) for HIV/AIDS, case detection under the DOTS strategy for tuberculosis (DOTS) and insecticide-treated nets (ITNs) for malaria prevention were selected to estimate programmatic contributions to international targets for the three diseases. Targets of Global Fund-supported programmes were projected based on proposals for Rounds 1 to 4 and compared to international targets for 2009. Results for Global Fund-supported programmes total 544 000 people on ARV, 1.4 million on DOTS and 11.3 million for ITNs by June 2006. Global Fund-supported programmes contributed 18% of international ARV targets, 29% of DOTS targets and 9% of ITNs in sub-Saharan Africa by mid-2006. Existing Global Fund-supported programmes have agreed targets that are projected to account for 19% of the international target for ARV delivery expected for 2009, 28% of the international target for DOTS and 84% of ITN targets in sub-Saharan Africa. Global Fund-supported programmes have already contributed substantially to international targets by mid-2006, but there is a still significant gap. Considerably greater financial support is needed, particularly for HIV, in order to achieve international targets for 2009. (author's)
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  2. 2
    316242
    Peer Reviewed

    Reaching the targets for tuberculosis control: the impact of HIV.

    Laserson KF; Wells CD

    Bulletin of the World Health Organization. 2007 May; 85(5):325-420.

    In 1991, the 44th World Health Assembly set two key targets for global tuberculosis (TB) control to be reached by 2000: 70% case detection of acid-fast bacilli smear-positive TB patients under the DOTS strategy recommended by WHO and 85% treatment success of those detected. This paper describes how TB control was scaled up to achieve these targets; it also considers the barriers encountered in reaching the targets, with a particular focus on how HIV infection affects TB control. Strong TB control will be facilitated by scaling-up WHO-recommended TB/HIV collaborative activities and by improving coordination between HIV and TB control programmes; in particular, to ensure control of drug-resistant TB. Required activities include more HIV counselling and testing of TB patients, greater use and acceptance of isoniazid as a preventive treatment in HIV-infected individuals, screening for active TB in HIV-care settings, and provision of universal access to antiretroviral treatment for all HIV-infected individuals eligible for such treatment. Integration of TB and HIV services in all facilities (i.e. in HIV-care settings and in TB clinics), especially at the periphery, is needed to effectively treat those infected with both diseases, to prolong their survival and to maximize limited human resources. Global TB targets can be met, particularly if there is renewed attention to TB/HIV collaborative activities combined with tremendous political commitment and will. (author's)
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