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Your search found 3 Results

  1. 1
    340428

    Consolidated guidelines on the use of antiretroviral drugs for treating and preventing HIV infection: recommendations for a public health approach. 2nd ed.

    World Health Organization [WHO]

    Geneva, Switzerland, WHO, 2016. [480] p.

    These guidelines provide guidance on the diagnosis of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection, the use of antiretroviral (ARV) drugs for treating and preventing HIV infection and the care of people living with HIV. They are structured along the continuum of HIV testing, prevention, treatment and care. This edition updates the 2013 consolidated guidelines on the use of antiretroviral drugs following an extensive review of evidence and consultations in mid-2015, shared at the end of 2015, and now published in full in 2016. It is being published in a changing global context for HIV and for health more broadly.
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  2. 2
    384211
    Peer Reviewed

    Simplification of antiretroviral therapy: a necessary step in the public health response to HIV/AIDS in resource-limited settings.

    Vitoria M; Ford N; Doherty M; Flexner C

    Antiviral therapy. 2014; 19 Suppl 3:31-7.

    The global scale-up of antiretroviral therapy (ART) over the past decade represents one of the great public health and human rights achievements of recent times. Moving from an individualized treatment approach to a simplified and standardized public health approach has been critical to ART scale-up, simplifying both prescribing practices and supply chain management. In terms of the latter, the risk of stock-outs can be reduced and simplified prescribing practices support task shifting of care to nursing and other non-physician clinicians; this strategy is critical to increase access to ART care in settings where physicians are limited in number. In order to support such simplification, successive World Health Organization guidelines for ART in resource-limited settings have aimed to reduce the number of recommended options for first-line ART in such settings. Future drug and regimen choices for resource-limited settings will likely be guided by the same principles that have led to the recommendation of a single preferred regimen and will favour drugs that have the following characteristics: minimal risk of failure, efficacy and tolerability, robustness and forgiveness, no overlapping resistance in treatment sequencing, convenience, affordability, and compatibility with anti-TB and anti-hepatitis treatments.
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  3. 3
    342819
    Peer Reviewed

    Pediatric HIV: new opportunities to treat children.

    Van der Linden D; Callens S; Brichard B; Colebunders R

    Expert Opinion On Pharmacotherapy. 2009 Aug; 10(11):1783-91.

    BACKGROUND: Treating HIV-infected children remains a challenge due to a lack of treatment options, appropriate drug formulations and, in countries with limited resources, insufficient access to diagnostic tests and treatment. OBJECTIVE: To summarize current data concerning new opportunities to improve the treatment of HIV-infected children. METHODS: This review includes data from the most recently published peer-reviewed publications, guidelines or presentations at international meetings concerning new ways to treat HIV-infected children. RESULTS/CONCLUSIONS: New WHO guidelines recommend starting combination antiretroviral treatment in all infants aged < 1 year. Although this is common practice in some high-income countries, implementation of these recommendations in countries with limited resources is still a challenge. There is still an important gap between the availability of licensed drugs in children compared with adults. There remains a need for further pharmacokinetic studies, and for more pediatric formulations of antiretroviral drugs with improved palatability.
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