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Your search found 3 Results

  1. 1
    318844
    Peer Reviewed

    Bixby symposium on population and conservation: Key note address.

    Goodall J

    Population and Environment. 2007 May; 28(4-5):274-282.

    Full transcript of Dr. Goodall's keynote address at the Bixby symposium on Population and Conservation, held at the University of California, Berkeley on May 6, 2006. Dr. Goodall contrasts population growth amongst chimpanzees and human beings and discusses current conservation efforts of the Jane Goodall Institute in the Gombe region of Tanzania and the development of the TACARE (take care) program. (author's)
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  2. 2
    274990

    District guidelines for yellow fever surveillance.

    World Health Organization [WHO]. Division of Emerging and Other Communicable Diseases Surveillance and Control; World Health Organization [WHO]. Expanded Programme on Immunization [EPI]

    Geneva, Switzerland, WHO, Division of Emerging and Other Communicable Diseases Surveillance and Control, 1998. 59 p. (WHO/EPI/GEN/98.09)

    Yellow fever is a viral haemorrhagic fever transmitted by mosquitos infected with the yellow fever virus. The disease is untreatable, and case fatality rates in severe cases can exceed 50%. Yellow fever can be prevented through immunization with the 17D yellow fever vaccine. The vaccine is safe, inexpensive and reliable. A single dose provides protection against the disease for at least 10 years and possibly life-long. There is high risk for an explosive outbreak in an unimmunized population—and children are especially vulnerable—if even one laboratory-confirmed case of yellow fever occurs in the population. Effective activities for disease surveillance remain the best tool for prompt detection and response to an outbreak of yellow fever especially in populations where coverage rates for yellow fever vaccine are not high enough to provide protection against yellow fever. The guidelines in this manual describe how to detect and confirm suspected cases of yellow fever. They also describe how to respond to an outbreak of yellow fever and prevent additional cases from occurring. The guidelines are intended for use at the district level. (excerpt)
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  3. 3
    066873

    Why Audubon has population programmes.

    Baldi P

    EARTHWATCH. 1991; (41):15.

    The National Audubon Society began a population program in 1979, set up a 5-year plan of public education, advocacy and coalition-building in 1985, and joined a broad-based coalition of the Sierra Club, the National Wildlife Federation, the Population Crisis Committee and the Planned Parenthood Federation of America in 1990. The 1985 impetus resulted in production of teaching materials and staging of focus groups across the U.S. The 1990 coalition has directed funds to the USAID Office of Population. Another project is the International Environment/Population Network, which organizes letter-writing, media programs and town meetings for ordinary citizens to press for sustainable development. Many of the Audubon's 510 local chapters have partnerships with similar groups in other countries, as do 8 wildlife sanctuaries have links to sanctuaries abroad. An example is the Indus River in Pakistan visited by the manager of Audubon's Platte River Sanctuary in Nebraska. The 2 rivers share the problem of reduced flow and vegetation overgrowth as a result of engineering projects upstream.
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