Your search found 10 Results

  1. 1
    345941
    Peer Reviewed

    Male circumcision: towards a World Health Organisation normative practice in resource limited settings.

    Hargreave T

    Asian Journal of Andrology. 2010; 12(5):628-638.

    There is now grade 1 evidence that male circumcision (MC) reduces the risk of a man acquiring HIV. Modelling studies indicate MC could in the next 10 years save up to 2 million lives in those African countries with high HIV prevalence. Several African countries are now scaling up public health MC programmes. The most effective immediate public health MC programmes in Africa will need to target 18-20 years old men. In the longer term there is a need for infant circumcision programmes. In order to implement more widespread MC there is a need to make the surgical procedures as simple as possible so that safe operations can be performed by paramedical staff. The WHO Manual of Male Circumcision under local anaesthetic was written with these objectives in mind. Included in the manual are three adult techniques and four paediatric procedures. The adult procedures are the dorsal slit, the forceps guided and the sleeve resection methods. Paediatric methods included are the plastibell technique, the Mogen and Gomco shield method and a standard surgical dorsal slit procedure. Each method is described in a step by step manner with photographic and line drawing illustrations. In addition to the WHO manual of surgical technique a teaching course has been developed and using this course it has been possible in one week to train a circumcision surgeon who has had no or minimal previous surgical experience. Further scaling will require training of circumcision surgeons, monitoring performance, training the trainer workshops as well as advocacy at national, international and government meetings. In addition to proceeding with standardised methods work is in progress to assess novel techniques in adults such as stay on ring devices and policies are being formulated as to how to assess new devices. Also work is in progress to explore efficiencies in surgical processing by task sharing. Proper informed consent and safety remain paramount and great care has to be taken as programmes in Africa scale up. In continental China where the HIV epidemic is at a much earlier stage there may be a case for considering infant circumcision but great care will be needed to ensure that there is no harm.
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  2. 2
    320992
    Peer Reviewed

    Surgical services in low-income and middle-income countries.

    Spiegel DA; Gosselin RA

    Lancet. 2007 Sep 22; 370(9592):1013-1015.

    Although substantial progress has been made in addressing the burden of communicable and vaccine-preventable diseases in low-income and middle-income countries, the burden of diseases that are surgically treatable is increasing and has been neglected. Both morbidity and mortality from surgically preventable (eg, elective hernia repair) or treatable (eg, strangulated hernia) disorders can be greatly decreased through simple surgical interventions. Why should a child die from appendicitis, or a mother and child succumb to obstructed labour, when simple surgical procedures can save their lives? Why should patients suffer permanent disability because of congenital abnormalities, fractures, burns, or the sequelae of acute infections such as septic arthritis or osteomyelitis? Many complications of HIV infection (eg, abscesses, fistulas, Kaposi sarcoma) are also amenable to simple surgical interventions. Available epidemiological information and experiential evidence lend support to the conclusion that basic surgical and anaesthetic services should be integrated into primary health-care packages. (excerpt)
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  3. 3
    660297

    Basic and clinical aspects of intra-uterine devices. Report of a WHO scientific group.

    WHO SCIENTIFIC GROUP

    Geneva, World Health Organization, 1966. (Technical Report Series NO. 332).

    The value and possible hazards of IUDs are discussed. Grafenberg developed a metal ring IUD in 1928. There was initial enthusiasm about the device, but it became discredited and interest was not revived in the method until 1959. Today, various shapes, sizes, and materials are employed in making IUD'S. No single cause or mechanism of action of an IUD has so far come to light. In sub-human primates the IUD causes accelerated passage of ova through the tube and the rest of the reproductive tract appears to be the major, but not necessarily the only, mechanism, of action. In ruminants, the contraceptive action of the IUD is exerted, at least in part, at the ovarian level. In rats, mice, rabbits, and ferrets, the main effect of the IUD is suppression of the implantation. It is concluded that the action of the IUDs in the human species is exerted before the stage of implantation. The most effective devices are associated with an incidence of 1.8 to 2.9 pregnancies per 100 insertions during the first year of use. The frequency of spontaneous expulsion ranges from about 5% to over 20% depending on the type of device. About one half of all expulsions occur in the first 3 months and comparatively few after the first year. The incidence of removal for medical reasons ranges from approximately 10% to 25% of first insertions during the first year. The method can be used successfully by almost 3 out of every 4 women who adopt it. Side effect and complications include bleeding and pain and less frequently pelvic inflammatory disease and perforation. The only absolute contraindications to the use of IUDs are: (1) active pelvic inflammatory disease, and (2) pregnancy, proven or suspected. Research needs are noted.
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  4. 4
    137712

    New laws limit access to family planning in Colombia.

    Eschen A

    AVSC NEWS. 1997 Summer; 35(2):1, 8.

    Two recent laws adopted by the Colombian Ministry of Health have had a detrimental effect on access to family planning (FP) services and have affected AVSC's work in that country, which is widely regarded as a trendsetter in reproductive health and FP among Latin American nations. One of the laws, which went into effect in 1993, provides universal health care regardless of ability to pay and allows people to choose between public or private health facilities. This law fails to specify, however, which FP services are covered, and the new agencies that act as liaisons between individuals, employers, and hospitals or clinics are unwilling to provide coverage for sterilization or contraception. Individuals who have paid for insurance resist paying an extra amount for contraception. The other law, enacted in 1991, restricts the delivery of anesthesia to anesthesiologists. In hospitals without full-time anesthesiologists, this has impeded delivery of many outpatient surgical procedures or treatment of incomplete abortion. It also prevents performance of female sterilization under local anesthesia. The laws have halted much of AVSC's work in establishing services for female sterilization under local anesthesia in public hospitals. AVSC has responded to the laws by working to help public and private sector providers manage the changes, producing a public information brochure, disseminating the law to service providers, and training anesthesiologists to promote female sterilization. In 1996, the 1993 law was clarified to ensure access to reproductive health and FP services.
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  5. 5
    079594

    Essential elements of obstetric care at first referral level.

    World Health Organization [WHO]

    Geneva, Switzerland, WHO, 1991. vii, 72 p.

    Members of WHO's Technical Working Group on Essential Obstetric Functions at First Referral Level have prepared a book geared towards district, provincial, regional, national, and international decision makers, particularly those in developing countries, whose areas of expertise include planning, financing, and organization and management of obstetric services. The guidelines should allow them to improve referral services' standards at the district level. They should also help them decide how far and by what means they may possibly expand some of these services to more peripheral levels, e.g., renovating facilities and improving staff. When developing these guidelines, WHO took in consideration that many countries confront serious economic obstacles. The book's introduction briefly discusses maternal morbidity and mortality in developing countries and maternity care in district health systems. The second chapter, which makes up the bulk of the book, addresses primary components of obstetric care related to causes of maternal death. This chapter's section on surgical obstetrics examines cesarean section and repair of high vaginal and cervical tears among others. Its other sections include anesthesia, medical treatment, blood replacement, manual procedures and monitoring labor, family planning support, management of women at high risk, and neonatal special care. The third section provides guidelines for implementation of these services, including cost and financial considerations. It emphasizes the need at the first referral level to have the least trained personnel perform as many health care procedures as possible, as long as they can do so safely and effectively. Other implementation issues are facilities, equipment, supplies, drugs, supervision, evaluation, and research. Annexes list the required surgical and delivery equipment, materials for side ward laboratory tests and blood transfusions, essential drugs, and maternity center facilities and equipment.
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  6. 6
    051976

    The use of essential drugs. Third report of the WHO Expert Committee.

    World Health Organization [WHO]. Expert Committee on the Use of Essential Drugs

    WORLD HEALTH ORGANIZATION TECHNICAL REPORT SERIES. 1988; (770):1-63.

    This booklet incorporates both guidelines and criteria for establishing national programs for essential drugs, and a suggested list of approximately 250 essential drugs. It is important to emphasize that it is up to each country to decide whether to implement an essential drug policy, and how to adapt the list to their own changing needs. Guidelines for a national program include accepting recommendations by a local committee; using generic names and providing a cross index; providing a drug information sheet to accompany the list; regulation or constant testing of quality of the drugs; deciding on the level of expertise needed to prescribe each drug; administration of supply, storage and distribution. Choice of drugs is based on quality, bioavailability, safety, price and availability. Criteria for selection of drugs for primary health care involves evaluation of existing medical care systems, the national health infrastructure, trained personnel and available supplies, and the pattern of endemic disease. Each agent is listed by its international nonproprietary name (INN), is accompanied by substitutions and complementary drugs, and is described by its route of administration, dosage form and strength. Listings are by category and alphabetically.
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  7. 7
    043987

    Laparoscopic tubal ligation under local anesthesia.

    Massouda D; Muram D

    JOURNAL OF THE TENNESSEE MEDICAL ASSOCIATION. 1986 Feb; 79(2):75-6.

    275 laparoscopic tubal ligations were done safely and economically at the Planned Parenthood of Memphis outpatient clinic from May 1983 to June 1985. Patients were carefully selected and counselled, eliminating those with previous abdominal surgery, excluding cesarean section, and those with ongoing pregnancy or serious gynecological or medical problems. The trained staff of experienced laparoscopic surgeons and certified registered nurse anesthetists practiced emergency procedures before surgery. Anesthesia was a minimal amount of nalbuphine (Nubain) 20 to 40 mg and droperidol (Inapsine) 1.25 to 2.5 mg; or fentanyl 0.1 to 0.25 mg and droperidol 1.25 to 2.5 mg; occasionally nitrous oxide inhalation. Some women received droperidol 1.25 to 2.5 mg or diazepam 2.5 to 5 mg beforehand. The laporoscopic procedure, performed through a small intraumbilical incision, employed the fallop ring. The incision was closed with 000 Dexon subcuticular sutures. There were minor side effects in 23: nausea in 20, vomiting in 2 and wound infection in 1. Two pregnancies occurred: 1 was not detected in the preliminary pregnancy test and the other was a procedure failure. The sterilization program is considered safe and resonably priced, $450 compared to $1150 to 1469 in area hospitals outpatient clinics.
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  8. 8
    765514

    Techniques of male sterilization.

    MORRIS N; ARTHURE H

    In: Morris, N. and Arthure, H. Sterilization as a means of birth control in men and women. London, Peter Owen, 1976. p. 80-100

    Vasectomy was 1st used at the start of the 20th century and became prominent in the 1950s in family planning programs in Asian countries. The secondary sex characteristics do not change after vasectomy, and there is normal erectile power, libido, orgasm, and ejaculatory volume. Spermatogenesis continues normally in men following vasectomy, and plasma testosterone levels remain unchanged. Vasectomy involves cutting both vasa deferentes through an incision in the scrotum which is usually performed with local anesthesia without hospitalization. Preliminary counseling is necessary so that both partners understand the nature and effects of the operation. Semen banks may be used when available for men undergoing vasectomy. There is no evidence for the greater efficiency of 1 technique over the other. Patients must submit sperm samples for examination after 8-12 weeks and then every 4 weeks until 2 consecutive specimens are negative. Possible complications include: 1) a vasovagal reaction; 2) skin discoloration; 3) edema of the scrotal skin, 4) postoperative pain, 5) infection; 6) ulceration and gangrene of the scrotal skin, and 7) hydrocele or epididymo-orchitis. Successful reanastamosis of the vas deferens with reappearance of sperm can be accomplished in 50-80% of the patients, and the semen is not of quality to insure impregnation in 1/4 of these cases.
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  9. 9
    735549

    Conclusions and recommendations of the IPPF Central Medical Committee (CMC) and its panel of experts on sterilization.

    Keinman RL

    In: Kleinman, R.L., ed. Male and female sterilization. A report of the meeting of the IPPF Panel of Experts on Sterilization, Bombay, January 11-14, 1973. London, International Planned Parenthood Federation, 1973. p. 8-12

    The conclusions and recommendations fall into 3 categories, i.e., policy, administrative and technical. Important points in the 1st category include; that sterilization be available and avilable on request, that it be voluntary, and that facilities for reversal procedures be free and avilable. Administrave recommendations include; that no arbitrary hospital stay be assinged to vasectomy patients, that no arbitrary selection criteria concerning previous training or surgical skill be used in accepting personnel for vasectomy patients, that no arbitrary selection criteria concerning previous training or surgical skill be used in accepting personnel for vasectomy training, and that endoscopic techniques should not be done without an anesthetist. Among the technical recommendations were: that postpartum sterilization under local anesthesia by laparotomy be encouraged, as that is the simplest of all female procedures; taht vaginal procedures should only be done with proper operative and anathestic facilities; that division of the uteirne tubes by the Pomeroy technique using 0 chromic catgut should be employed in mass programs of female sterilization; the removal of part of the uterine tube for biopsy and histological examination as a check on the success of the operation should not be done; general anesthesia should never be used for a simple vasectomy unless there are complications; and that tetanus toxoid should not be given to avoid infection.
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  10. 10
    741781

    International Women's Year: report of the working group to the Commission on the Status of Women.

    United Nations. Economic and Social Council

    New York, United Nations Economic and Social Council, January 1974. (No. 74-02861). 18 p

    The Working Group on the Draft Programme of Activities for International Women's Year, established in 1974 by the Commission on the Status of Women, and composed of members from Argentina, Belgium, Byelorussian S.S.R., Chile, Colombia, Costa Rica, Finland, France, Greece, India, Indonesia, Liberia, Nigeria Philippines, U.S.S.R., and U.S. met at the U.N. for 7 meetings in January 1974; the recommendations from those meetings are presented. The central focus of the International Women's year is the promotion of equality between the sexes and work toward a full integration of women in the developmental effort of the countriesW The central theme of the year is equality, development, and peace. Equality refers to equality before the law, meeting health needs of females equally with those of males, equality of economic rights, equality of rights and responsibilities in the family, and equality in decision making. Development includes such areas as improving the living and working conditions of women and men, improving the quality of rural life, improving the condition of the rural women, eliminating illiteracy, and insuring equality in educational opportunities, and providing training guidance, and counseling to women. Peace includes promoting the peace efforts of women's groups, working for the advancement of the status of both sexes and thus working for world peace. It is noted that studies are needed on all aspects of the status of women and the changing roles of the sexes in different countries. Another recommendation is that exchange programs be promoted for men and women where the common problems could be studied. Also included are recommendations for activities at the regional and international level (proclamations) and topics for research, study, seminars, and similar types of meetings.
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