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Your search found 3 Results

  1. 1
    374591

    The state of food security and nutrition in the world 2017: building resilience for peace and food security.

    Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations [FAO]; International Fund for Agricultural Development [IFAD]; UNICEF; United Nations. World Food Programme; World Health Organization [WHO]

    Rome, Italy, FAO, 2017. 133 p.

    This report has been jointly published by the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO), the International Fund for Agricultural Development (IFAD), the United Nations Children’s Fund (UNICEF), the World Food Programme (WFP) and the World Health Organization (WHO). The 2017 edition marks the beginning of a new era in monitoring efforts to achieve a world without hunger and malnutrition within the framework of the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). The report will henceforth monitor progress towards the targets on both ending hunger (SDG Target 2.1) and ending all forms of malnutrition (SDG Target 2.2). It will also include analyses of how food security and nutrition are related to progress on other SDG targets.
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  2. 2
    273821

    Should adolescents be specifically targeted for nutrition in developing countries? To address which problems, and how?

    Delisle H; Chandra-Mouli V; de Benoist B

    Geneva, Switzerland, World Health Organization [WHO], [2001]. 38 p.

    Concern for nutrition in adolescence has been rather limited, except in relation to pregnancy. This paper reviews adolescent-specific nutritional problems, and discusses priority issues for the health sector, particularly in developing countries. Chronic malnutrition in earlier years is responsible for widespread stunting and adverse consequences at adolescence in many areas, but it is best prevented in childhood. Iron deficiency and anaemia are the main problem of adolescents world-wide; other micronutrient deficiencies may also affect adolescent girls. Improving their nutrition before they enter pregnancy (and delaying it), could help to reduce maternal and infant mortality, and contribute to break the vicious cycle of intergenerational malnutrition, poverty, and even chronic disease. Food-based and health approaches will oftentimes need to be complemented by micronutrient supplementation using various channels. Promoting healthy eating and lifestyles among adolescents, particularly through the urban school system, is critical to halt the rapid progression of obesity and other nutrition related chronic disease risks. There are pressing research needs, notably to develop adolescent-specific anthropometric reference data, to better document adolescents' nutritional and micronutrient status, and to assess the cost-effectiveness of multinutrient dietary improvement (or supplements) in adolescent girls. Our view is that specific policies are needed at country level for adolescent nutrition, but not specific programmes. (author's)
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  3. 3
    183451

    School-age children: their nutrition and health.

    Drake L; Maier C; Jukes M; Patrikios A; Bundy D

    SCN News. 2002 Dec; (25):4-30.

    This paper addresses the most common nutrition and health problems in turn, assessing the extent of the problem; the impact of the condition on overall development, and what programmatic responses can be taken to remedy the problem through the school sys- tern. The paper also acknowledges that an estimated 113m children of school-age are not in school, the majority of these children living in Sub-Saharan Africa and South-East Asia. Poor health and nutrition that differentially affects this population is also discussed. (excerpt)
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