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  1. 1
    332277

    Guidelines for the treatment of malaria. Second edition.

    World Health Organization [WHO]

    Geneva, Switzerland, WHO, 2010. [211] p.

    The World Health Organization Guidelines for the treatment of malaria provides evidence-based and up-to-date recommendations for countries on malaria diagnosis and treatment which help countries formulate their policies and strategies. In scope, the Guidelines cover the diagnosis and treatment of uncomplicated and severe malaria caused by all types of malaria, including in special groups (young children, pregnant women, HIV / AIDS), in travellers (from non-malaria endemic regions) and in epidemics and complex emergency situations. The first edition of the Guidelines for the treatment of malaria were published in 2006. The second edition introduces a new 5th ACT to the four already recommended for the treatment of uncomplicated malaria. Furthermore, the Guidelines recommend a parasitological confirmation of diagnosis in all patients suspected of having malaria before treating. The move towards universal diagnostic testing of malaria is a critical step forward in the fight against malaria as it will allow for the targeted use of ACTs for those who actually have malaria. This will help to reduce the emergence and spread of drug resistance. It will also help identify patients who do not have malaria, so that alternative diagnoses can be made and appropriate treatment provided. The new Guidelines will therefore help improve the management of not only malaria, but other childhood febrile illnesses.
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  2. 2
    104400

    Hookworm infection and anaemia: approaches to prevention and control.

    Pawlowski ZS; Schad GA; Stott GJ

    Geneva, Switzerland, World Health Organization [WHO], 1991. vi, 96 p.

    WHO published this manual on the prevention and control of hookworm infection and anemia primarily for community health workers. The manual addresses the epidemiology, diagnosis, and management of these conditions. Its annexes provide details of appropriate examination techniques for hookworm and hookworm anemia surveys and sample survey considerations. It emphasizes the importance of thorough population surveys. The worldwide prevalence of infection with Ancylostoma duodenale and Necator americanus is about 25%. It occurs predominantly in developing countries, where prevalence may be as high as 80% in some areas. It is a major cause of iron deficiency anemia. Its presence indicates deficiencies in sanitation and health education. Many persons, including public health officials, are not interested in national control of hookworm infection, probably because it induces low mortality and it is technically difficult to measure and quantify hookworm-related morbidity. Control of hookworm infection and hookworm-related anemia is uncomplicated and effective. It consists of health education, effective sanitation, and treatment with antihelminthics and iron supplements. The manual's seven chapters cover the following: hookworms infecting humans; clinical pathology of hookworm infection; hookworm infection as a cause of anemia; epidemiology of hookworm infection; principles of prevention and control; assessing the situation; and practical prevention and control.
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