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  1. 1
    332277

    Guidelines for the treatment of malaria. Second edition.

    World Health Organization [WHO]

    Geneva, Switzerland, WHO, 2010. [211] p.

    The World Health Organization Guidelines for the treatment of malaria provides evidence-based and up-to-date recommendations for countries on malaria diagnosis and treatment which help countries formulate their policies and strategies. In scope, the Guidelines cover the diagnosis and treatment of uncomplicated and severe malaria caused by all types of malaria, including in special groups (young children, pregnant women, HIV / AIDS), in travellers (from non-malaria endemic regions) and in epidemics and complex emergency situations. The first edition of the Guidelines for the treatment of malaria were published in 2006. The second edition introduces a new 5th ACT to the four already recommended for the treatment of uncomplicated malaria. Furthermore, the Guidelines recommend a parasitological confirmation of diagnosis in all patients suspected of having malaria before treating. The move towards universal diagnostic testing of malaria is a critical step forward in the fight against malaria as it will allow for the targeted use of ACTs for those who actually have malaria. This will help to reduce the emergence and spread of drug resistance. It will also help identify patients who do not have malaria, so that alternative diagnoses can be made and appropriate treatment provided. The new Guidelines will therefore help improve the management of not only malaria, but other childhood febrile illnesses.
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  2. 2
    157614

    [L'Oreal aids women in science in the countries of the South] L'Oreal aide la science au feminin dans les pays du Sud.

    de Sainte Lorette C

    EQUILIBRES ET POPULATIONS. 2001 Mar; (66):4.

    The L’Oreal Award for Women in Science rewards 5 scientists annually with UNESCO support. As such, L’Oreal, a cosmetics manufacturer, is making an effort to support women’s role in research in both developed and developing countries. Professor Adeyinda Gladys Falusi, a 2001 award recipient, describes the difficult conditions in which she has studied, for 25 years, the molecular genetics of often seen hereditary blood diseases in Nigeria, such as falci-form anemia. In Africa, and especially Nigeria, a lack of resources frustrates research. When resources are available, the equipment is old and poorly maintained. Energy and transport problems also exist, including frequent power outages. It is common for lights and computers to lose power in the middle of an experiment. Regarding information sources, research centers and universities lack funding to subscribe to scientific journals. Although many of her colleagues have gone to work in countries with better research conditions, Professor Falusi prefers to remain in Nigeria with hopes of having a more significant impact upon her society. She hopes her research will directly and significantly help populations. Professor Falusi visits schools to help prevent the diseases she researches, such as anemia, affecting 3 million people in Nigeria and associated with multiple complications. She also researches malaria. Falusi and her colleagues lack the resources and support they need to properly teach the population about its health and provide access to health services. They depend upon international aid, which should be more forthcoming.
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  3. 3
    132200
    Peer Reviewed

    Integrated management of childhood illness: conclusions. WHO Division of Child Health and Development.

    Gove S

    BULLETIN OF THE WORLD HEALTH ORGANIZATION. 1997; 75 Suppl 1:119-28.

    Studies have helped improve the guidelines for the integrated management of childhood illness (IMCI) as well as the WHO/UNICEF training course for teaching those guidelines to health workers in first-level health facilities. Those guidelines can lead to the appropriate management of sick children by health workers in first-level facilities. Field studies' results on the effectiveness of the guidelines are presented and important issues to address are identified. The paper also describes the process for adapting program guidelines to specific country situations and presents the broader IMCI strategy and the status of its implementation in several countries as of May 1997. The following issues in need of further attention are discussed: the performance of lower chest wall indrawing as a sign for referral, the specificity of the clinical signs of malaria in settings of low malaria prevalence, the performance of clinical signs in detecting anemia, and the performance of the guidelines in identifying children in need of referral. Program strategy objectives are to reduce the levels of child morbidity and mortality in developing countries, and to enhance child growth and development. IMCI activities are therefore organized to improve health workers' skills, health systems, and family and community practices.
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