Your search found 4 Results

  1. 1
    302658

    Meeting on African Children Without Family Care, Windhoek, 30 November 2002. Final report.

    Meeting on African Children Without Family Care (2002: Windhoek)

    Windhoek, Namibia, Family Health International [FHI], 2002. 15 p.

    This workshop followed the November 25-29 Eastern and Southern Africa Workshop on Children Affected by HIV/AIDS. Approximately 50 people, representing 17 countries, attended the one-day workshop, which was convened by the UNICEF Eastern and Southern Africa Regional Office in Nairobi with the support and co-operation of USAID and Family Health International. The objectives of this workshop were to: Share knowledge, information and experience relating to alternative forms of care for children without family care (orphans and other vulnerable children in each country who are living in institutional care, on the street, child headed households etc.) with a major focus on how to strengthen and greatly increase better care for such children in Africa; Identify issues of common concern relating to alternative care, and discuss possible solutions; Enable delegates to incorporate this information into country-level action; and Consider possible next steps. (excerpt)
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  2. 2
    296143
    Peer Reviewed

    Traditional medicine development for medical and dental primary health care delivery system in Africa.

    Elujoba AA; Odeleye OM; Ogunyemi CM

    African Journal of Traditional, Complementary and Alternative Medicines. 2005; 2(1):46-61.

    Traditional African Medicine (TAM) is our socio-economic and socio-cultural heritage, servicing over 80% of the populations in Africa. Although, it has come a long way from the times of our ancestors, not much significant progress on its development and utilization had taken place due to colonial suppression on one hand, foreign religions in particular, absolute lack of patriotism and political will of our Governments, and then on the other hand, the carefree attitudes of most African medical scientists of all categories. It is incontrovertible that TAM exhibits far more merits than demerits and its values can be exploited provided the Africans themselves can approach it with an open mind and scientific mentality. The degree of sensitization and mobilization by the World Health Organization (WHO) has encouraged some African countries to commence serious development on TAM. The African Regional Director of the WHO has outlined a few guidelines on the responsibilities of all African nations for the realistic development of TAM, in order to sustain our health agenda and perpetuate our culture. The gradual extinction of the forests and the inevitable disappearance of the aged Traditional Medical Practitioner should pose an impending deadline for us to learn, acquire and document our medical cultural endowment for the benefit of all Africans and indeed the entire mankind. (author's)
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  3. 3
    293436
    Peer Reviewed

    Contemporary issues in women's health.

    Johnson TR; Adanu RM

    International Journal of Gynecology and Obstetrics. 2006; 92:5-9.

    The April 2005 edition of Population Reports provides a detailed summary of the different contraceptive choices that are currently available. The report focuses on effective, less costly, easier to deliver contraceptive innovations that have fewer side effects. While some of the new contraceptives discussed are already available in some countries, others are on the brink of introduction. Some of the new methods covered include vaginal rings, transdermal patches, spray-on contraceptives and new implants. Two new variations on fertility awareness-based methods -- the Standard Days Method and the Two-Day method -- are described. The Standard Days Method is reported to be as effective as barrier methods for women with regular cycles between 26 and 32 days long. The Two-Day method can be used by women with cycles of any length regardless of regularity. It however produces best results in couples who can avoid unprotected intercourse for about 10--15 days per cycle. (excerpt)
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  4. 4
    180169
    Peer Reviewed

    Searching for antimalarials in plants.

    Bodeker G

    Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine. 2000 Apr; 6(2):127-129.

    In recognition of the fact that local communities afflicted by malaria typically use local herbal treatments (Bitahwa et al., 1997 Willcox, 1999)-either with or instead of conventional drugs-this type of new research thinking underpins the agenda of the newly formed Research Initiative for Traditional Antimalarial Methods (RITAM) (Bodeker & Willcox, 2000b). WHO is promoting new drug cocktails, many that are derived from single ingredients of plants, as the new way to combat drug-resistant malaria. The absurd situation has arisen in which synthetic synergism is being sought after it has been rejected in its natural state. The cost of antimalarial cocktails is estimated to be up to seven times that of the already-expensive existing antimalarials. Clearly, a local, sustainable, and affordable response to malaria is called for-one that recognizes that this is where the fight against malaria began and where it continues. (excerpt)
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