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  1. 1
    282153

    Open your eyes or be blind forever. Namibia.

    Ashipala-Hako AN

    Paris, France, UNESCO, Division of Basic Education, Literacy and Non-Formal Education Section, 2003 Sep. [25] p. (Literacy, Gender and HIV / AIDS Series)

    This booklet is one of an ever-growing series of easy-to-read materials produced at a succession of UNESCO workshops. The workshops are based on the appreciation that gender-sensitive literacy materials are powerful tools for communicating messages on HIV/AIDS to poor rural people, particularly illiterate women and out-of-school girls. Based on the belief that HIV/AIDS is simultaneously a health and a social, cultural and economic issue, the workshops train a wide range of stakeholders in HIV/AIDS prevention including literacy, health and other development workers, HIV/AIDS specialists, law enforcement officers, material developers and media professionals. Before a workshop begins, the participants select their target communities and carry out needs assessments of their potential readers. (excerpt)
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  2. 2
    067794

    Report from Consultation on Psychosocial Research Needs in HIV Infection and AIDS, Geneva, 25-28 May 1987.

    World Health Organization [WHO]. Global Programme on AIDS

    [Unpublished] 1989. 18 p. (WHO/GPA/SBR/89.2)

    A meeting was held to review the state of research upon the behavioral aspects of HIV transmission, the social factors associated with it, and the effectiveness of control measures, and to consider priorities and future social and behavioral research directions. Despite advances in the virology and immunology of AIDS, much research is called for regarding behavioral aspects of HIV transmission and the impact of AIDS on individual and community life. Such knowledge may be applied in developing effective intervention strategies. The report discusses the nature of the problem, followed by specific topics in the social and behavioral aspects of HIV transmission. Sexual behavior, homosexuality, prostitution, substance abuse, and injections and other skin piercing practices are covered. Social perceptions and explanatory systems are explored, along with coping strategies broken into family children, psychosocial expression, counselling, and family, marriage and reproduction subtopics. Recommendations for research are set forth in the report, aimed at high risk behavior, explanatory models/systems, and coping responses. A variety of research methodologies are suggested, and include population-based surveys, psychometric, ethnographic, and other psychosocial approaches as well as focus group methods. Brief closing mention is made of translating research into action, technical working groups, collaborating centers, a research steering committee, and communications/information.
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