Your search found 3 Results

  1. 1
    292994

    Age misreporting in Malawian censuses and sample surveys: an application of the United Nations' joint age and sex score.

    Palamuleni ME

    South African Journal of Demography. 1995; 5(1):11-17.

    The impact of age in demographic analyses, factors associated with age misreporting, the United Nations' procedure of evaluating age statistics and the application of this procedure to Malawian censuses are discussed. Although age reporting still remains inaccurate, there is some evidence to suggest a slight improvement in the quality of age reporting. Age misreporting varies from one region or district to another. These variations are explained in terms of the existing social, historical and cultural differences within the country. (author's)
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  2. 2
    166379

    Age misreporting in Malawian censuses and sample surveys: an application of the United Nations joint age and sex score.

    Palamuleni ME

    Tanzanian Journal of Population Studies and Development. 1997; 4(1):84-105.

    The paper is divided into four parts. The first part, the introduction, discusses the importance of age in demographic analysis and some factors associated with age misreporting. The second section describes the UN's procedure of evaluating age statistics. The third part is the main section of the paper and deals with the application of the procedure described in the second section to the Malawian database. The fourth section, the conclusion, presents the major findings of the study in a summary form. The study has revealed that although age reporting still remains inaccurate, there is some evidence to suggest a slight improvement in the quality of age reporting. It has further been shown that age misreporting varies from one region or district to another. It appears these differentials can be explained in terms of existing social, historical and cultural factors differences within the country. (author's)
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  3. 3
    207997

    Palestinian refugee statistics, digit preference and the Turner hypothesis.

    Weller RH; Serow WJ; Bailey M

    POPULATION BULLETIN OF ESCWA. 1987 Dec; (31):5-23.

    The UN Relief and Works Agency for Palestine Refugees (UNRWA) was originally established by the UN General Assembly as a temporary agency to provide services for those persons whose normal residence was Palestine preceding the Arab-Israeli conflict in 1984 and who, as a result of the conflict, lost both their homes and their livelihood. UNRWA routinely collects data on the demographic, social, and economic characteristics of the registered refugee population. On the basis of relatively low age heaping and digit preference patterns, the UNRWA data are relatively useful. The amount of inferred age misreporting in the UNRWA data is less than in censuses conducted in countries in the area. There are variations in the quality of the data by country and through time. The quality of the data appears highest in Lebanon and lowest in the Gaza Strip. Within each of the 5 areas studied, the quality of the data has improved markedly through time. The data also seem better for males than for females. The UNRWA data seem internally consistent and appear to be favorable in comparison to data available for other populations in the Middle East. Although the there is digit preference/avoidance, it is not systematic, and its degree has lessened since the beginning of the study. UNRWA does not collect its statistics under the best of circumstances. It inherited registration lists from its predecessor rather than having the luxury of beginning its own. It is an agency that dispenses welfare in the form of rations, housing, and social and economic services. Hence, many of its clients are suspicious of its attempts to gather information on them. Moreover, for many Palestinians there is no other documentary proof of their Palestinian identity that would be accepted internationally.
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