Important: The POPLINE website will retire on September 1, 2019. Click here to read about the transition.

Your search found 44 Results

  1. 1
    393580

    Trends in Antiretroviral Therapy Eligibility and Coverage Among Children Aged <15 Years with HIV Infection - 20 PEPFAR-Supported Sub-Saharan African Countries, 2012-2016.

    Burrage A; Patel M; Mirkovic K; Dziuban E; Teferi W; Broyles L; Rivadeneira E

    MMWR. Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report. 2018 May 18; 67(19):552-555.

    Rapid disease progression and associated opportunistic infections contribute to high mortality rates among children aged <15 years with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection (1). Antiretroviral therapy (ART) has decreased childhood HIV-associated morbidity and mortality rates over the past decade (2). As accumulating evidence revealed lower HIV-associated mortality with early ART initiation, the World Health Organization (WHO) guidelines broadened ART eligibility for children with HIV infection (2). Age at ART initiation for children with HIV infection expanded sequentially in the 2010, 2013, and 2016 WHO guidelines to include children aged <2, <5, and <15 years, respectively, regardless of clinical or immunologic status (3-5). The United States President's Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief (PEPFAR) has supported ART for children with HIV infection since 2003 and, informed by the WHO guidelines and a growing evidence base, PEPFAR-supported countries have adjusted their national pediatric guidelines. To understand the lag between guideline development and implementation, as well as the ART coverage gap, CDC assessed national pediatric HIV guidelines and analyzed Joint United Nations Programme on HIV and AIDS (acquired immunodeficiency syndrome; UNAIDS) data on children aged <15 years with HIV infection and the numbers of these children on ART. Timeliness of WHO pediatric ART guideline adoption varied by country; >50% of children with HIV infection are not receiving ART, underscoring the importance of strengthening case finding and linkage to HIV treatment in pediatric ART programs.
    Add to my documents.
  2. 2
    393455

    Child Malnutrition in Pakistan: Evidence from Literature.

    Asim M; Nawaz Y

    Children. 2018 May 4; 5(5)

    Pakistan has one of the highest prevalences of child malnutrition as compared to other developing countries. This narrative review was accomplished to examine the published empirical literature on children’s nutritional status in Pakistan. The objectives of this review were to know about the methodological approaches used in previous studies, to assess the overall situation of childhood malnutrition, and to identify the areas that have not yet been studied. This study was carried out to collect and synthesize the relevant data from previously published papers through different scholarly database search engines. The most relevant and current published papers between 2000(-)2016 were included in this study. The research papers that contain the data related to child malnutrition in Pakistan were assessed. A total of 28 articles was reviewed and almost similar methodologies were used in all of them. Most of the researchers conducted the cross sectional quantitative and descriptive studies, through structured interviews for identifying the causes of child malnutrition. Only one study used the mix method technique for acquiring data from the respondents. For the assessment of malnutrition among children, out of 28 papers, 20 used the World Health Organization (WHO) weight for age, age for height, and height for weight Z-score method. Early marriages, large family size, high fertility rates with a lack of birth spacing, low income, the lack of breast feeding, and exclusive breastfeeding were found to be the themes that repeatedly emerged in the reviewed literature. There is a dire need of qualitative and mixed method researches to understand and have an insight into the underlying factors of child malnutrition in Pakistan.
    Add to my documents.
  3. 3
    389490
    Peer Reviewed

    A growth reference for mid upper arm circumference for age among school age children and adolescents, and validation for mortality: growth curve construction and longitudinal cohort study.

    Mramba L; Ngari M; Mwangome M; Muchai L; Bauni E; Walker AS; Gibb DM; Fegan G; Berkley JA

    BMJ. 2017 Aug 03; 358:j3423.

    Objectives To construct growth curves for mid-upper-arm circumference (MUAC)-for-age z score for 5-19 year olds that accord with the World Health Organization growth standards, and to evaluate their discriminatory performance for subsequent mortality.Design Growth curve construction and longitudinal cohort study.Setting United States and international growth data, and cohorts in Kenya, Uganda, and Zimbabwe.Participants The Health Examination Survey (HES)/National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) US population datasets (age 5-25 years), which were used to construct the 2007 WHO growth reference for body mass index in this age group, were merged with an imputed dataset matching the distribution of the WHO 2006 growth standards age 2-6 years. Validation data were from 685 HIV infected children aged 5-17 years participating in the Antiretroviral Research for Watoto (ARROW) trial in Uganda and Zimbabwe; and 1741 children aged 5-13 years discharged from a rural Kenyan hospital (3.8% HIV infected). Both cohorts were followed-up for survival during one year.Main outcome measures Concordance with WHO 2006 growth standards at age 60 months and survival during one year according to MUAC-for-age and body mass index-for-age z scores.Results The new growth curves transitioned smoothly with WHO growth standards at age 5 years. MUAC-for-age z scores of -2 to -3 and less than-3, compared with -2 or more, was associated with hazard ratios for death within one year of 3.63 (95% confidence interval 0.90 to 14.7; P=0.07) and 11.1 (3.40 to 36.0; P<0.001), respectively, among ARROW trial participants; and 2.22 (1.01 to 4.9; P=0.04) and 5.15 (2.49 to 10.7; P<0.001), respectively, among Kenyan children after discharge from hospital. The AUCs for MUAC-for-age and body mass index-for-age z scores for discriminating subsequent mortality were 0.81 (95% confidence interval 0.70 to 0.92) and 0.75 (0.63 to 0.86) in the ARROW trial (absolute difference 0.06, 95% confidence interval -0.032 to 0.16; P=0.2) and 0.73 (0.65 to 0.80) and 0.58 (0.49 to 0.67), respectively, in Kenya (absolute difference in AUC 0.15, 0.07 to 0.23; P=0.0002).Conclusions The MUAC-for-age z score is at least as effective as the body mass index-for-age z score for assessing mortality risks associated with undernutrition among African school aged children and adolescents. MUAC can provide simplified screening and diagnosis within nutrition and HIV programmes, and in research. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.
    Add to my documents.
  4. 4
    366018
    Peer Reviewed

    Early Infant Diagnosis of HIV.

    Chandra J; Yadav D

    Indian Pediatrics. 2015 Apr; 52(4):293-5.

    Add to my documents.
  5. 5
    331138
    Peer Reviewed

    Trends in infant nutrition in Saudi Arabia: compliance with WHO recommendations.

    El Mouzan MI; Al Omar AA; Al Salloum AA; Al Herbish AS; Qurachi MM

    Annals of Saudi Medicine. 2009 Jan-Feb; 29(1):20-3.

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE: The WHO recommends exclusive breastfeeding in the first 6 months of life. Our objective was to evaluate trends in infant nutrition in Saudi Arabia and the degree of compliance with WHO recommendations. SUBJECTS AND METHODS: A nationwide nutritional survey of a sample of Saudi households was selected by the multistage probability sampling procedure. A validated questionnaire was administered to mothers of children less than 3 years of age. RESULTS: Of 5339 children in the sample, 4889 received breast milk at birth indicating a prevalence of initiation of 91.6%. Initiation of breastfeeding was delayed beyond 6 hours after birth in 28.1% of the infants. Bottle feeding was introduced by 1 month of age to 2174/4260 (51.4%) and to 3831/4260 (90%) by 6 months of age. The majority of infants 3870/4787 (80.8%) were introduced to "solid foods" between 4 to 6 months of age and whole milk feedings were given to 40% of children younger than 12 months of age. CONCLUSIONS: The current practice of feeding of Saudi infants is very far from compliance with even the most conservative WHO recommendations of exclusive breastfeeding for 4 to 6 months. The high prevalence of breastfeeding initiation at birth indicates the willingness of Saudi mothers to breastfeed. However, early introduction of complementary feedings reduced the period of exclusive breastfeeding. Research in infant nutrition should be a public health priority to improve the rate of breastfeeding and to minimize other inappropriate practices.
    Add to my documents.
  6. 6
    327213

    Tobacco use among students aged 13 - 15 years - Sri Lanka, 1999 - 2007.

    United States. Center for Disease Control [CDC]

    MMWR. Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report. 2008 May 23; 57(20):545-549.

    Tobacco use is one of the major preventable causes of premature death and disease in the world. The World Health Organization (WHO) attributes approximately 5 million deaths per year to tobacco use, a number expected to exceed 8 million per year by 2030. In 1999, the Global Youth Tobacco Survey (GYTS) was initiated by WHO, CDC, and the Canadian Public Health Association to monitor tobacco use, attitudes about tobacco use, and exposure to secondhand smoke (SHS) among students aged 13-15 years. Since 1999, the survey has been completed by approximately 2 million students in 151 countries. A key goal of GYTS is for countries to repeat the survey every 4 years. This report summarizes results from GYTS conducted in Sri Lanka in 1999, 2003, and 2007. The findings indicated that during 1999-2007, the percentage of students aged 13-15 years who reported current cigarette smoking decreased, from 4.0% in 1999 to 1.2% in 2007. During this period, the percentage of never smokers in this age group likely to initiate smoking also decreased, from 5.1% in 1999 to 3.7% in 2007. Future declines in tobacco use in Sri Lanka will be enhanced through development and implementation of new tobacco-control measures and strengthening of existing measures that encourage smokers to quit, eliminate exposure to SHS, and encourage persons not to initiate tobacco use. (excerpt)
    Add to my documents.
  7. 7
    326038

    Anti-tuberculosis drug resistance in the world. Fourth global report. The WHO / IUATLD Global Project on Anti-Tuberculosis Drug Resistance Surveillance, 2002-2007.

    Wright A; Zignol M

    Geneva, Switzerland, World Health Organization [WHO], 2008. [140] p. (WHO/HTM/TB/2008.394)

    This is the fourth report of the WHO/IUATLD Global Project on Anti-Tuberculosis Drug Resistance Surveillance. The three previous reports were published in 1997, 2000 and 2004 and included data from 35, 58 and 77 countries, respectively. This report includes drug susceptibility test (DST) results from 91,577 patients from 93 settings in 81 countries and 2 Special Administrative Regions (SARs) of China collected between 2002 and 2006, and representing over 35% of the global total of notified new smear-positive TB cases. It includes data from 33 countries that have never previously reported. New data are available from the following high TB burden countries: India, China, Russian Federation, Indonesia, Ethiopia, Philippines, Viet Nam, Tanzania, Thailand, and Myanmar. Between 1994 and 2007 a total of 138 settings in 114 countries and 2 SARs of China had reported data to the Global Project. Trend data (three or more data points) are available from 48 countries. The majority of trend data are reported from low TB prevalence settings; however this report includes data from three Baltic countries and 2 Russian Oblasts. Trend data were also available from 6 countries conducting periodic or sentinel surveys (Cuba, Republic of Korea, Nepal, Peru, Thailand, and Uruguay). (excerpt)
    Add to my documents.
  8. 8
    322017

    Antiretroviral therapy for HIV infection in infants and children: towards universal access. Recommendations for a public health approach.

    World Health Organization [WHO]. Department of HIV / AIDS

    Geneva, Switzerland, WHO, 2007. [147] p.

    These stand-alone treatment guidelines serve as a framework for selecting the most potent and feasible first-line and second-line ARV regimens as components of expanded national responses for the care of HIV-infected infants and children. Recommendations are provided on: diagnosing HIV infection in infants and children; when to start ART, including situations where severe HIV disease in children less than 18 months of age has been presumptively diagnosed; clinical and laboratory monitoring of ART; substitution of ARVs for toxicities. The guidelines consider ART in different situations, e.g. where infants and children are coinfected with HIV and TB or have been exposed to ARVs either for the prevention of MTCT (PMTCT) or because of breastfeeding from an HIV-infected mother on ART. They address the importance of nutrition in the HIV-infected child and of severe malnutrition in relation to the provision of ART. Adherence to therapy and viral resistance to ARVs are both discussed with reference to infants and children. A section on ART in adolescents briefly outlines key issues related to treatment in this age group. (excerpt)
    Add to my documents.
  9. 9
    318979

    Hormonal contraception and bone health.

    World Health Organization [WHO]. Department of Reproductive Health and Research

    Geneva, Switzerland, WHO, Department of Reproductive Health and Research, 2007. [2] p. (Provider Brief)

    Hormonal contraceptives, which include birth control pills, injections, implants, the patch and the vaginal ring, all use hormones to keep a woman from getting pregnant. These hormones can have other health effects for women, many of them beneficial, besides just preventing pregnancy. However, some questions have been raised about how particular hormonal contraceptives, DMPA (depot medroxyprogesterone acetate with trade names of Depo-Provera, Depo-Clinovir and others) and NET-EN (norethisterone enantate or Noristerat, Norigest, Doryxas and others), may affect the health of women's bone. (excerpt)
    Add to my documents.
  10. 10
    318273

    Women, ageing and health: a framework for action. Focus on gender.

    World Health Organization [WHO]. Department of Gender, Women and Health

    Geneva, Switzerland, WHO, 2007. 55 p.

    The concepts and principles in this document build on the World Health Organization's active ageing policy framework, which calls on policy-makers, practitioners, nongovernmental organizations and civil society to optimize opportunities for health, participation and security in order to enhance quality of life for people as they age. This requires a comprehensive approach that takes into account the gendered nature of the life course. This report endeavors to provide information on ageing women in both developing and developed countries; however, data is often scant in many areas of the developing world. Some implications and directions for policy and practice based on the evidence and known best practices are included in this report. These are intended to stimulate discussion and lead to specific recommendations and action plans. The report provides an overall framework for taking action that is useful in all settings. Specific responses in policy, practice and research is undoubtedly best left to policy-makers, experts and older people in individual countries and regions, since they best understand the political, economic and social context within which decisions must be made. (excerpt)
    Add to my documents.
  11. 11
    317118
    Peer Reviewed

    Standard deviation of anthropometric Z-scores as a data quality assessment tool using the 2006 WHO growth standards: A cross country analysis.

    Mei Z; Grummer-Strawn LM

    Bulletin of the World Health Organization. 2007 Jun; 85(6):441-448.

    Height- and weight-based anthropometric indicators are used worldwide to characterize the nutritional status of populations. Based on the 1978 WHO/National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS) growth reference, the World Health Organization has previously indicated that the standard deviation (SD) of Z-scores of these indicators is relatively constant across populations, irrespective of nutritional status. As such, the SD of Z-scores can be used as quality indicators for anthropometric data. In 2006, WHO published new growth standards. Here, we aim to assess whether the SD of height- and weight-based Z-score indicators from the 2006 WHO growth standards can still be used to assess data quality. We examined data on children aged 0-59 months from 51 Demographic and Health Surveys (DHS) in 34 developing countries. We used 2006 growth standards to assign height-for-age Z-scores (HAZ), weight-for-age Z-scores (WAZ), weight-for-height Z-scores (WHZ) and body-mass-index-for-age Z-scores (BMIZ). We also did a stratified analysis by age group. The SD for all four indicators were independent of their respective mean Z-scores across countries. Overall, the 5th and 95th percentiles of the SD were 1.35 and 1.95 for HAZ, 1.17 and 1.46 for WAZ, 1.08 and 1.50 for WHZ and 1.08 and 1.55 for BMIZ. Our results concur with the WHO assertion that SD is in a relatively small range for each indicator irrespective of where the Z-score mean lies, and support the use of SD as a quality indicator for anthropometric data. However, the ranges of SDs for all four indicators analysed were consistently wider than those published previously by WHO. (author's)
    Add to my documents.
  12. 12
    309554
    Peer Reviewed

    Comparison of the World Health Organization (WHO) Child Growth Standards and the National Center for Health Statistics / WHO international growth reference: implications for child health programmes.

    de Onis M; Onyango AW; Borghi E; Garza C; Yang H

    Public Health Nutrition. 2006 Oct; 9(7):942-947.

    The objectives were to compare growth patterns and estimates of malnutrition based on the World Health Organization (WHO) Child Growth Standards ('the WHO standards') and the National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS)/WHO international growth reference ('the NCHS reference'), and discuss implications for child health programmes. Design: Secondary analysis of longitudinal data to compare growth patterns (birth to 12 months) and data from two cross-sectional surveys to compare estimates of malnutrition among under-fives. Settings: Bangladesh, Dominican Republic and a pooled sample of infants from North America and Northern Europe. Subjects: Respectively 4787, 10 381 and 226 infants and children. Healthy breast-fed infants tracked along the WHO standard's weight-for-age mean Z-score while appearing to falter on the NCHS reference from 2 months onwards. Underweight rates increased during the first six months and thereafter decreased when based on the WHO standards. For all age groups stunting rates were higher according to the WHO standards. Wasting and severe wasting were substantially higher during the first half of infancy. Thereafter, the prevalence of severe wasting continued to be 1.5 to 2.5 times that of the NCHS reference. The increase in overweight rates based on the WHO standards varied by age group, with an overall relative increase of 34%. The WHO standards provide a better tool to monitor the rapid and changing rate of growth in early infancy. Their adoption will have important implications for child health with respect to the assessment of lactation performance and the adequacy of infant feeding. Population estimates of malnutrition will vary by age, growth indicator and the nutritional status of index populations. (author's)
    Add to my documents.
  13. 13
    306007
    Peer Reviewed

    Over-the-counter access, changing WHO guidelines, and contraindicated oral contraceptive use in Mexico.

    Yeatman SE; Potter JE; Grossman DA

    Studies in Family Planning. 2006 Sep; 37(3):197-204.

    This study examines the prevalence of contraindications to the use of oral contraceptives in Mexico by sociodemographic characteristics and by whether this family planning method was obtained with or without a doctor's prescription. Using data on smoking behavior and blood-pressure measurements from the 2000 Mexican National Health Survey, the authors found that, under the 1996 World Health Organization (WHO) medical eligibility guidelines, the prevalence of contraindications is low and that no significant differences in contraindications exist at any level between those who obtain oral contraceptives at clinics and those who obtain them at pharmacies. In 2000, however, WHO substantially revised its criteria regarding the level of hypertension that would constitute a contraindication for oral contraceptive use. Applying the new guidelines, the authors found that 10 percent of pill users younger than 35 and 33 percent aged 35 and older have health conditions that are either relative or absolute (Category 3 or 4) contraindications. The relevance of these findings to the larger debate concerning screening and over-the-counter access to oral contraceptives is discussed. (author's)
    Add to my documents.
  14. 14
    302644

    FHI's quick reference chart for the WHO medical eligibility criteria for contraceptive use. To initiate or continue the use of combined oral contraceptive (COC), Noristerat (NET-EN), Depo-Provera (DMPA), copper intrauterine device (Cu-IUD).

    Family Health International [FHI]

    [Research Triangle Park, North Carolina], FHI, 2004 Mar. [1] p.

    I/C (Initiation/Continuation): A woman may fall into either one category or another, depending on whether she is initiating or continuing to use a method. For example, a client with current PID who wants to initiate IUD use would be considered as Category 4, and should not have an IUD inserted. However, if she develops PID while using the IUD, she would be considered as Category 2. This means she could generally continue using the IUD and be treated for PID with the IUD in place. Where I/C is not marked, a woman with that condition falls in the category indicated - whether or not she is initiating or continuing use of the method. (excerpt)
    Add to my documents.
  15. 15
    294522
    Peer Reviewed

    Use of oral contraceptives and hormone replacement therapy in the WHO MONICA project.

    Lundberg V; Tolonen H; Stegmayr B; Kuulasmaa K; Asplund K

    Maturitas. 2004 May 28; 48(1):39-49.

    The aims were to compare menopausal age and the use of oral contraceptives (OC) and hormonal replacement therapy (HRT) between the 32 populations of the WHO MONICA Project, representing 20 different countries. Using a uniform protocol, age at menopause and the use of OC and HRT was recorded in a random sample of 25-64 year-old women attending the final MONICA population cardiovascular risk factor survey between 1989 and 1997. A total of 39,120 women were included. There were wide variations between the populations in the use of OC and HRT. The use of OC varied between 0 and 52% in pre-menopausal women aged 35-44 years, Central and East Europe and North America having the lowest and West Europe and Australasia the highest prevalence rates. Among post-menopausal women between 45 and 64 years, the prevalence of HRT use varied from 0 to 42%. In general, the use of HRT was high in Western and Northern Europe, North America and Australasia and low in Central, Eastern and Southern Europe and China. With the exception of Canada (45 years), the mean age at menopause differed only little (ranging from 48 to 50 years) between the populations. The use of OC and HRT varies markedly between populations, in general following a regional pattern. Whereas, the prevalence rates are mostly similar within a country, there are remarkable differences even between neighbouring countries, reflecting nation-specific medical practice and public attitudes that are not necessarily based on scientific evidence. (author's)
    Add to my documents.
  16. 16
    296646

    Valiadation of a new clinical case definition for paediatric HIV infection, Bloemfontein, South Africa [letter]

    Joubert G; Shoeman CJ; Bester CJ

    Journal of Tropical Pediatrics. 2005 Dec; 51(6):387.

    In 2003 a study was published, evaluating the WHO clinical case definition for paediatric HIV infection in Bloemfontein, South Africa. It was found that the WHO case definition could only detect 14.5 per cent of children who were in fact symptomatic and HIV positive on age-appropriate serology testing. Following logistic regression analysis, a new case definition was proposed, namely that HIV is suspected in a child who has at least two of the following four signs: marasmus, hepatosplenomegaly, oropharyngeal candidiasis, and generalized lymphadenopathy. This new case definition had a sensitivity of 63.2 per cent and a specificity of 96.0 per cent. (excerpt)
    Add to my documents.
  17. 17
    296401

    WHO report 2005: TB linked to HIV at alarming levels in Africa.

    Reinhardt E

    UN Chronicle. 2005 Jun-Aug; 42(2):[5] p..

    The battle against tuberculosis (TB) is being successfully fought in most areas of the world, but in Africa the disease has reached alarming proportions with an increasing number of cases and deaths linked to HIV, said the World Health Organization in its WHO Report 2005, Global Tuberculosis Control: Surveillance, Planning, Financing, released on 24 March to coincide with World TB Day. The WHO Report focuses on five principal indicators: incidence, prevalence, deaths, case detection and treatment success. It finds that its prevalence has declined worldwide by more than 20 per cent since 1990 and that incidence rates are falling or stable in all regions except in Africa, where TB rates have tripled since 1990 in countries with high HIV prevalence and continue to rise at 3 to 4 per cent annually. (excerpt)
    Add to my documents.
  18. 18
    292135
    Peer Reviewed

    Gender, age, and ethnicity in HIV vaccine-related research and clinical trials. Report from a WHO-UNAIDS consultation, 26-28 August 2004. Lausanne, Switzerland.

    WHO-UNAIDS Expert Group

    AIDS. 2005 Nov 18; 19(17):w7-w28.

    This report summarizes the presentations and recommendations from a consultation held in Lausanne, Switzerland (26–28 August 2004) organized by the joint World Health Organization (WHO) – United Nations Programme on HIV/AIDS (UNAIDS) HIV Vaccine Initiative. The consultation discussed issues related to gender, ethnicity, and age in HIV vaccine research and clinical trial recruitment. A special focus of the meeting was the participation of women and adolescents in clinical trials. Also discussed were the experiences and lessons from various research programs, trials, and studies in different countries. Implementing the recommendations from this meeting will require prioritization and active participation from the research community, funders of research, local and national governments, non-governmental organizations, and industry, as well as the individuals and communities participating in clinical trials. This report contains the collective views of an international group of experts, and does not necessarily represent the decisions or the stated policy of the WHO. The contribution of the co-chairs (R. Macklin and F. Mhalu) and the rapporteurs (H. Lasher, M. Klein, M. Ackers, N. Barsdorf, A. Smith Rogers, E. Levendal, T. Villafana and M. Warren) during the consultation and in the preparation of this report is much appreciated. S. Labelle and J. Otani are also acknowledged and thanked for their efficient assistance in the preparation of the consultation and the report. (author's)
    Add to my documents.
  19. 19
    274803

    Technical bases for the WHO recommendations on the management of pneumonia in children at first-level health facilities.

    World Health Organization [WHO]. Programme for the Control of Acute Respiratory Infections

    Geneva, Switzerland, WHO, Programme for the Control of Acute Respiratory Infections, 1991. [26] p. (WHO/ARI/91.20)

    About 13 million children under 5 years of age die every year in the world, 95% of them in developing countries. Pneumonia is one of the leading causes, accounting for about 4 million of these deaths. Despite this fact, for a combination of technical and operational reasons, pneumonia has been a neglected problem until very recently. Clinicians and epidemiologists thought that the control of respiratory infections did not deserve high priority because of the difficulties involved in preventing and managing these infections; it was said that antibiotics might not be an effective treatment against pneumonia because patients are often weakened by conditions such as chronic malnutrition and parasitic infections, and that a wide variety of viruses and bacteria are associated with pulmonary infections making it impossible to identify the specific etiological agent in each patient (1.) On the other hand, some public health experts felt that a programme aimed at preventing mortality from pneumonia could not succeed because it would be difficult to deliver the available technology (antibiotics) through peripheral health units and community-based health workers. At most, one quarter of the pneumonia cases in children can be prevented by the measles and pertussis vaccines included in the immunization schedule of the Expanded Programme on Immunization. There is a clear need for research to develop and test vaccines against the most frequent agents of pneumonia in children. Such research has been pursued by WHO, notably within the Programe for the Control of Acute Respiratory Infections (ARI) and the Vaccine Development Programme; however, WHO has simultaneously been utilizing current clinical knowledge to formulate a case management strategy to reduce the high mortality from pneumonia in children. The present document is not intended to provide detailed case management guidelines. These are to be found in the manual "Acute respiratory infections in children: Case management in small hospitals in developing countries. A manual for doctors and other senior health workers", document WHO/ARI/90.5 (1990). (excerpt)
    Add to my documents.
  20. 20
    182210
    Peer Reviewed

    Prediction of community prevalence of human onchocerciasis in the Amazonian onchocerciasis focus: Bayesian approach. [Prévisions portant sur la prévalence communautaire de l'onchocercose humaine au niveau du foyer amazonien de l'onchocercose : approche bayésienne]

    Carabin H; Escalona M; Marshall C; Vivas-Martinez S; Botto C

    Bulletin of the World Health Organization. 2003 Jul; 81(7):482-490.

    Objective: To develop a Bayesian hierarchical model for human onchocerciasis with which to explore the factors that influence prevalence of microfilariae in the Amazonian focus of onchocerciasis and predict the probability of any community being at least mesoendemic (>20% prevalence of microfilariae), and thus in need of priority ivermectin treatment. Methods: Models were developed with data from 732 individuals aged515 years who lived in 29 Yanomami communities along four rivers of the south Venezuelan Orinoco basin. The models’ abilities to predict prevalences of microfilariae in communities were compared. The deviance information criterion, Bayesian P-values, and residual values were used to select the best model with an approximate cross-validation procedure. Findings: A three-level model that acknowledged clustering of infection within communities performed best, with host age and sex included at the individual level, a river-dependent altitude effect at the community level, and additional clustering of communities along rivers. This model correctly classified 25/29 (86%) villages with respect to their need for priority ivermectin treatment. Conclusion: Bayesian methods are a flexible and useful approach for public health research and control planning. Our model acknowledges the clustering of infection within communities, allows investigation of links between individual- or community-specific characteristics and infection, incorporates additional uncertainty due to missing covariate data, and informs policy decisions by predicting the probability that a new community is at least mesoendemic. (author's)
    Add to my documents.
  21. 21
    182174
    Peer Reviewed

    Strategies for control of trachoma: observational study with quantitative PCR.

    Solomon AW; Holland MJ; Burton MJ; West SK; Alexander ND

    Lancet. 2003 Jul 19; 362(9379):198-204.

    Background: Antibiotics are an important part of WHO’s strategy to eliminate trachoma as a blinding disease by 2020. At present, who needs to be treated is unclear. We aimed to establish the burden of ocular Chlamydia trachomatis in three trachomaendemic communities in Tanzania and The Gambia with real-time quantitative PCR. Methods: Conjunctival swabs were obtained at examination from 3146 individuals. Swabs were first tested by the qualitative Amplicor PCR, which is known to be highly sensitive. In positive samples, the number of copies of omp1 (a single-copy C trachomatis gene) was measured by quantitative PCR. Findings: Children had the highest ocular loads of C trachomatis, although the amount of pooling in young age groups was less striking at the site with the lowest trachoma frequency. Individuals with intense inflammatory trachoma had higher loads than did those with other conjunctival signs. At the site with the highest prevalence of trachoma, 48 of 93 (52%) individuals with conjunctival scarring but no sign of active disease were positive for ocular chlamydiae. Interpretation: Children younger than 10 years old, and those with intense inflammatory trachoma, probably represent the major source of ocular C trachomatis infection in endemic communities. Success of antibiotic distribution programmes could depend on these groups receiving effective treatment. (author's)
    Add to my documents.
  22. 22
    182917

    Hepatitis B in St Petersburg, Russia (1994-1999): incidence, prevalence and force of infection.

    Beutels P; Shkedy Z; Mukomolov S; Aerts M; Shargorodskaya E

    Journal of Viral Hepatitis. 2003 Mar; 10(2):141-149.

    Hepatitis B (HB) is thought to be an expanding health problem in Russia. The incidence of infection was estimated from mandatorily reported HB cases in St Petersburg. The two-sided t-test for independent samples and the LOESS (locally-weighted regression) smoother were used to compare the age at infection for symptomatic, asymptomatic and chronic infections, by gender. The force of infection was estimated from seroprevalence data (907 sera taken in 1999) using a newly developed nonparametric method based on local polynomials, as well as an earlier method based on isotonic regression and kernel smoothers. With the local polynomial method, pointwise confidence intervals (95%) were constructed by bootstrapping. On average, men contracted HB infection at a significantly younger age than women (in 1999, 21.8 vs 22.7 years, respectively). The overall male to female ratio was 1.92. In 1999 the overall incidence almost doubled compared with the preceding years and tripled among the age groups with highest incidence (15–29-year olds: 85% of cases in 1999). The incidence increase was associated with a lower average age at infection (24.1 years in 1994 vs 22.1 years in 1999). The age and gender-specific force of infection estimates generally confirmed the incidence estimates and emphasized the usefulness of local polynomials to do this. Hence HB transmission in St Petersburg occurs mainly in young adults. The dramatic increase of infections in 1999 was probably due to injecting drug use. Without intervention, HB virus is expected to continue to spread rapidly with a greater proportion of female infections caused by sexual transmission. These trends may also provide an indication for HIV transmission. (author's)
    Add to my documents.
  23. 23
    052262
    Peer Reviewed

    Measles immunisation before the age of nine months? Position statement by the Expanded Programme on Immunisation of the World Health Organisation.

    World Health Organization [WHO]. Expanded Programme on Immunization [EMI]

    Lancet. 1988 Dec 10; 2(8624):1356-7.

    In developing countries, where measles in young infants results in high mortality, it would be advantageous to immunize children at 6 months. However, the efficacy of standard-dose vaccines at 6 months is low, and a second dose at 9 months is required, which all too often is not given. At a meeting in Washington, D.C., sponsored by the World Health Organization, the US Agency for International Development, and the US National Institutes of Health. Comparative data were presented for the higher-than-standard dose Edmonston-Zagreb vaccine, the AIK-C vaccine, and Schwarz vaccines given earlier than 9 months, with standard-dose Schwarz measles vaccine given at 9 months. The data were reviewed by the Expanded Program on Immunization and the Global Advisory Group, which concluded that higher-than-standard dose vaccines for use before 9 months needed further evaluation and countries should continue to administer standard vaccines after 9 months except among high-risk populations, where standard dose vaccines should be given at 6 months and the children reimmunized after 9 months.
    Add to my documents.
  24. 24
    041374

    The global eradication of smallpox. Final report of the Global Commission for the Certification of Smallpox Eradication, Geneva, December 1979.

    World Health Organization [WHO]. Global Commission for the Certification of Smallpox Eradication

    Geneva, Switzerland, WHO, 1980. 122 p. (History of International Public Health No. 4)

    The Global Commission for the Certification of Smallpox Eradication met in December 1978 to review the program in detail and to advise on subsequent activities and met again in December 1979 to assess progress and to make the final recommendations that are presented in this report. Additionally, the report contains a summary account of the history of smallpox, the clinical, epidemiological, and virological features of the disease, the efforts to control and eradicate smallpox prior to 1966, and an account of the intensified program during the 1967-79 period. The report describes the procedures used for the certification of eradication along with the findings of 21 different international commissions that visited and reviewed programs in 61 countries. These findings provide the basis for the Commission's conclusion that the global eradication of smallpox has been achieved. The Commission also concluded that there is no evidence that smallpox will return as an endemic disease. The overall development and coordination of the intensified program were carried out by a smallpox unit established at the World Health Organization (WHO) headquarters in Geneva, which worked closely with WHO staff at regional offices and, through them, with national staff and WHO advisers at the country level. Earlier programs had been based on a mass vaccination strategy. The intensified campaign called for programs designed to vaccinate at least 80% of the population within a 2-3 year period. During this time, reporting systems and surveillance activities were to be developed that would permit detection and elimination of the remaining foci of the disease. Support was sought and obtained from many different governments and agencies. The progression of the eradication program can be divided into 3 phases: the period between 1967-72 when eradication was achieved in most African countries, Indonesia, and South America; the 1973-75 period when major efforts focused on the countries of the Indian subcontinent; and the 1975-77 period when the goal of eradication was realized in the Horn of Africa. Global Commission recommendations for WHO policy in the post-eradication era include: the discontinuation of smallpox vaccination; continuing surveillance of monkey pox in West and Central Africa; supervision of the stocks and use of variola virus in laboratories; a policy of insurance against the return of the disease that includes thorough investigation of reports of suspected smallpox; the maintenance of an international reserve of freeze-dried vaccine under WHO control; and measures designed to ensure that laboratory and epidemiological expertise in human poxvirus infections should not be dissipated.
    Add to my documents.
  25. 25
    010086

    Research on the menopause.

    World Health Organization. Scientific Group

    World Health Organization Technical Report Series. 1981; (670):1-120.

    This report includes the collective views of a World Health Organization (WHO) Scientific Group on Research on the Menopause that met in Geneva during December 1980. It includes information on the following: 1) the endocrinology of the menopause and the postmenopausal period (changes in gonadotropins and estrogens immediately prior to the menopause and changes in gonadotropin and steroid hormone levels after the menopause); 2) the age distribution of the menopause (determining the age at menopause, factors influencing the age at menopause, and the range of ages at menopause and the definition of premature and delayed menopause); 3) sociocultural significance of the menopause in different settings; 4) symptoms associated with the menopause (vasomotor symptoms, psychological symptoms, disturbances of sexuality, and insomnia); 5) disorders resulting from, or possibly accelerated by, the menopause (osteoporosis, atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease, and arthritic disorders); 6) risks, with particular reference to neoplasia, of therapeutic estrogens and progestins given to peri- and postmenopausal women (endometrial cancer, breast cancer, and gallbladder disease); 7) fertility regulating methods for women approaching the menopause (fertility and the need for family planning in women approaching the menopause, problems of family planning in perimenopausal women, and considerations with regard to individual methods of family planning in women approaching the menopause); and 8) estrogen and the health care management of perimenopausal and postmenopausal women. At this time some controversy exists as to whether there is a menopausal syndrome of somatic and psychological symptoms and illness. There are virtually no data on the age distribution of the menopause and no information on its sociocultural significance in the developing countries. The subject of risks and benefits of estrogen therapy in peri- and postmenopausal women is of much importance in view of the large number of prescriptions issued for this medication in developed countries, which indicates their frequrnt use, and the different interpretations and opinions among epidemiologists and clinicians on both past and current studies on this subject. Specific recommendations made by the Scientific Group appear at the end of each section of the report. The following were among the general recommendations made: WHO sponsored research should be undertaken to determine the impact on health service needs of the rapidly increasing numbers of postmenopausal women in developing countries; uniform terminology should be adopted by health care workers with regard to the menopause; uniform endocrine standards should be developed which can be applied to the description of peri- and postmenopausal conditions and diseases; and descriptive epidemiological studies of the age at menopause should be performed in a variety of settings.
    Add to my documents.

Pages