Important: The POPLINE website will retire on September 1, 2019. Click here to read about the transition.

Your search found 6 Results

  1. 1
    308829

    UNICEF executive director appreciates Viet Nam's achievements on child protection.

    Vietnam Population News. 2007 Apr-Jun; (43):3-6.

    On 5 May 2007, Madame Le Thi Thu, Minister-Chair-woman of VCPFC, and heads of ministries and sectors warmly welcomed Ms. Ann M. Veneman, UNICEF's Executive Director. At the meeting, Madame Thu gave a brief on Viet Nam's achievements in child care, education and protection during the past few years and future work orientation. Children's living standards have been unceasingly improved, children's rights have been step by step met in terms of physical, intellectual, spiritual and morality. She hoped to receive the efficient support of UNICEF. Ms. Ann M. Veneman is impressed by Viet Nam's achievements. She said that UNICEF would have focus to HIV/AIDS, childhood injury, and under-five underweight. She recommended Viet Nam to pay more attention to causes of those issues, especially setting up databases and provide data/indicators that can be compared with other countries in the region. During her visit, Ms. Ann M. Veneman also met with Government officials to discuss about related matters. She said Viet Nam is likely to be one of the countries to reach the Millennium Development Goal (MDG) targets, with some of these targets ahead of 2015. Despite the significant progress achieved, there remain challenges, such as disparity between the rich and poor, impacts of HIV on children and protecting children from injury and harm. (excerpt)
    Add to my documents.
  2. 2
    273060

    The world population plan of action and the Mexico draft recommendations: analytical comparisons and index.

    United Nations. Department of Internation Economic and Social Affairs. Population Division

    [Unpublished] 1984 Jul 23. 136 p. (ESA/P/WP/85)

    This document, prepared primarily for use within the UN Secretariat, systematically compares the recommendtions of the World Population Plan of Action (WPPA) and the Mexico Draft recommendations for the implementation of the WPPA. There are 109 recommendations in the WPPA, and 85 in the Mexico Draft; they are compared using a 2-column format. An index provides cross referencing. Topics covered include the family and the staus of women, population characteristics (addressing, in particular, the implications of the increasing proportion of young persons in populations of developing countries), and the links between morbidity and mortality and family planning. For example, the WPPA notes that "mortality reduction may be a prerequisite to a decline in fertility." In light of this, the Mexico Draft recommends that governments take immediate action to increase infant survival by expanding the use of oral rehydration therapy, immunization, and the promotion of breast feeding. In addition, nutrient supplements and appropriate day-care facilities should be provided for nursing mothers in the labor force. Other areas addressed include the need to promote the development of management in all fields related to population. This need can be met with a worldwide system of institutions designed totrain personnel. Present educational institutions should expand their curricula to include the study of population dynamics and policy. Developing countries should be provided with technical equipment and financial support to improve library facilities, computer services, data-gathring, and analysis. While international cooperation is considered crucial to the implementation of the WPPA, national governments are urged to make the attainment of self-reliance in the management of their population programs a high priorit. In recognition of the diversity of national goals, no recommendations are made regarding a world family-size norm.
    Add to my documents.
  3. 3
    129910

    European Population Conference. Proceedings. Volume 2. 23-26 March 1993, Geneva, Switzerland. Conference Europeenne sur la Population. Actes. Volume 2. 23-26 mars 1993, Geneve, Suisse.

    United Nations. Economic Commission for Europe; Council of Europe; United Nations Population Fund [UNFPA]

    New York, New York, United Nations, 1994. 429 p.

    This volume contains country statements and statements by international and nongovernmental organizations for the 1993 European Population Conference that was jointly organized by the UN Economic Commission for Europe (ECC), the Council of Europe (CE), and the UN Population Fund (UNFPA). The conference aimed to review, examine, and analyze key population-related issues in the region's countries, to evaluate the implementation of population-related policies, and to prepare a set of recommendations on key population-related issues and policies. The five conference priorities were international migration, fertility and the family, health and mortality, population growth and age structure, and international cooperation in the field of population. Conference attendants included representatives from European countries, Argentina, Australia, Egypt, the Holy See, Japan, New Zealand, UN agencies, and 61 nongovernmental organizations. European countries and the world face the challenges of population growth, population impact on the environment, unsustainable modes of production and consumption, and human survival. Countries are inextricably linked, and international cooperation and solidarity are necessary. Developing countries, with the highest rates of population growth, are faced with generating adequate levels of sustainable economic and social development and with devoting sufficient resources to enable demographic transition. Europe's challenges include international migration and continuation of support in development and population programs for countries undergoing political and economic transition. Old national and ethnic rivalries have surfaced and now facilitate armed conflicts and serious political crises. Changes have occurred in fertility, the status of women, and the family. AIDS and drug abuse are causes for concern. This volume identifies 15 recommendations.
    Add to my documents.
  4. 4
    101178

    European Population Conference recommendations, March 1993, Geneva, Switzerland.

    United Nations. Economic Commission for Europe; Council of Europe; United Nations Population Fund [UNFPA]

    New York, New York, United Nations, 1994. iii, 31 p.

    An UN International Conference on Population and Development is scheduled to take place September 1994 in Cairo, Egypt. As part of preparations for the conference taking place around the world, the UN Economic Commission for Europe, the Council of Europe, and the UN Population Fund jointly convened the European Population Conference March 23-26, 1993, in Geneva, Switzerland, to discuss international migration, fertility and the family, health and mortality, selected consequences of population growth and the age structure, and international cooperation in the field of population. Participants also aimed to review, examine, and analyze key population-related issues in Europe and North America; to evaluate the implementation of population-related policies in countries of the region; and to prepare a set of recommendations addressing key population-related issues and policies. 74 recommendations emerging from the conference are presented as a reference source to government ministries and agencies, international and regional organizations and institutions, as well as national organizations and individual scholars interested in population issues and policies.
    Add to my documents.
  5. 5
    247993

    [External migration in 1983] Buitenlandse migratie in 1983

    Dekkers AJM; Kuijper H

    Maandstatistiek Van de Bevolking. 1985 Feb; 33(2):41-80.

    An analysis of international migration to and from the Netherlands in 1983 is presented. The demographic characteristics of both immigrants and emigrants are described, with attention to marital status, family relationship, sex, age, region of origin, and urban or rural residence. An appendix is included on the new U.N. recommendations concerning the collection of international migration statistics and the extent to which the Dutch data conform to these recommendations. (summary in ENG) (ANNOTATION)
    Add to my documents.
  6. 6
    268337

    Population growth: a global problem.

    Rosenfield A

    In: Current problems in obstetrics and gynecology, Vol. 5, No. 6, edited by John M. Leventhal. Chicago, Illinois, Year Book Medical Publishers, 1982. 4-41.

    This article addresses the medical aspects of population growth, with specific focus on a demographic overview, population policies, family planning programs, and population issues in the US. The dimensions of the population problem and their implications for social and economic development are reviewed. The world's response to these issues is discussed, followed by an assessment of what has been accomplished, particularly as it relates to the record of national family planning programs in developing countries. The impact of population growth on such issues as education, available farm land, deforestation, and urban growth are discussed. Urban populations are growing at an unprecedented rate, posing urgent problems for action. From a public health perspective, data are reviewed which demonstrate that having children at short intervals (2 years) or at unfavorable maternal ages (18 or 35) and/or parity (4) has a negative impact on maternal, infant and childhood morbidity and mortality, particularly in developing countries. Increasing the age of marriage, delaying the 1st birth, changing and improving the status of women, increasing educational levels and improving living conditions in general also are important in reducing population growth. Probably the most important, but most controversial intervention, has been the development of national family planning programs aimed at increasing the public's access to modern contraceptive and sterilization methods. India was the 1st country to declare a formal population policy (in the 1950s) with the goal of reducing population growth. Currently, close to 35 countries have formal policies. The planned parenthood movement, with central support from the London office of the International Planned Parenthood Federation (IPPF), has played a most important role in making family planning services available. 2 population issues in the US today are reviewed briefly in the final section: teenage pregnancy and the changing age structure.
    Add to my documents.