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Your search found 5 Results

  1. 1
    071907

    Israel.

    United Nations. Department of International Economic and Social Affairs. Population Division

    In: World population policies. Volume II. Gabon to Norway, [compiled by] United Nations. Department of International Economic and Social Affairs. Population Division. New York, New York, United Nations, 1989. 82-5. (Population Studies No. 102/Add.1; ST/ESA/SER.A/102/Add.1)

    Israel's 1985 population of 4,252,000 is projected to grow to 6,865,000 by the year 2025. In 1985, 31.7% of the population was aged 0-14 years, while 12.4% were over the age of 60. 22.9% and 16.6% are projected to be in these respective age groups by the year 2025. The rate of natural increase will have declined from 15.9 to 8.4 over the period. Life expectancy should increase from 74.4 to 77.7 years, the crude death rate will increase from 7.2 to 7.5, while infant mortality will decline from 14.2 to 7.2. The fertility rate will decline over the period from 3.1 to 2.3, with a corresponding drop in the crude birth rate from 23.2 to 15.9. The 1983 female mean age at 1st marriage was 23.5 years. Urban population will increase from 90.3% in 1985 to 95.6% overall by the year 2025. Morbidity, mortality, and spatial distribution are considered to be acceptable by the government, while population growth, fertility, immigration, and emigration are not. Israel has an explicit population policy. It works to secure both a larger and geographically-focused population suitable to meet the country's socio- and geopolitical objectives. Measures are in place to help realize these goals. Population policy as it relates to development objectives is discussed, followed by consideration of specific policies adapted and measures taken to address above-mentioned problematic demographic indicators. The status of women and population data systems are also explore.
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  2. 2
    071905

    Iraq.

    United Nations. Department of International Economic and Social Affairs. Population Division

    In: World population policies. Volume II. Gabon to Norway, [compiled by] United Nations. Department of International Economic and Social Affairs. Population Division. New York, New York, United Nations, 1989. 74-7. (Population Studies No. 102/Add.1; ST/ESA/SER.A/102/Add.1)

    Iraq's 1985 population of 15,898,000 is projected to grow to 43,520,000 by the year 2025. In 2985, 46.9% of the population was aged 0-14 years, while 4.3% were over the age of 60. 29.5% and 7.6% are projected to be in these respective age groups by the year 2025. The rate of natural increase will have declined from 35.7 to 16.4 over the period. Life expectancy should increase from 62.4 to 73.8 years, the crude death rate will decrease from 8.7 to 4.5, while infant mortality will decline from 77.1 to 20.6. The fertility rate will decline over the period from 6.7 to 2.5, with a corresponding drop in the crude birth rate from 44.4 to 21.0. The 1974 contraceptive prevalence rate was 14.0, while the 1977 female mean age at 1st marriage was 20.8 years. Urban population will increase from 70.6% in 1985 to 86.6% overall by the year 2025. Mortality, morbidity, immigration, emigration, and spatial distribution are considered to be acceptable by the government, while population growth and fertility are not. Iraq has an explicit population policy. It is decidedly pronatalist, and aims to raise fertility and increase population growth through maternal-child health programs, improved family welfare, and the provision of free medical care. A large and growing population is desired to support economic growth and development in the nation. Population policy as it relates to development objectives is discussed, followed by consideration of specific policies adopted and measures taken to address above-mentioned problematic demographic indicators. The status of women and population data systems are also explored.
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  3. 3
    071904

    Iran (Islamic Republic of).

    United Nations. Department of International Economic and Social Affairs. Population Division

    In: World population policies. Volume II. Gabon to Norway, [compiled by] United Nations. Department of International Economic and Social Affairs. Population Division. New York, New York, United Nations, 1989. 70-3. (Population Studies No. 102/Add.1; ST/ESA/SER.A/102/Add.1)

    Iran's 1985 population of 44,632,000 is projected to grow to 97,011,000 by the year 2025. In 1985, 42.7% of the population was aged 0-14 years, while 5.1% were over the age of 60. 25.3% and 10.2% are projected to be in these respective age groups by the year 2025. The rate of natural increase will have declined from 28.8 to 11.8 over the period. Life expectancy should increase from 57.3 to 72.0 years, the crude death rate will decrease from 12.0 to 6.0, while infant mortality will decline from 115.0 to 38.0. The fertility rate will decline over the period from 5.6 to 2.2, with a corresponding drop in the crude birth rate from 40.8 to 17.8. The 1978-79 contraceptive prevalence rate was 23.0, while the 1976 female mean age at 1st marriage was 19.7 years. Urban population will increase from 51.9% in 1985 to 74.6% overall by the year 2025. Population growth, fertility, and spatial distribution are considered to be acceptable by the government, while morbidity, mortality immigration, and emigration are not. Iran does not have an explicit population policy. The government instead finds balanced growth to be of greater concern than fertility control in solving the country's economic and social problems. Reduced immigration and emigration, and a modified population distribution are, however, sought. Population policy as it relates to development objectives is discussed, followed by consideration of specific policies adopted and measures taken to address above-mentioned problematic demographic indicators. The status of women and population data systems are also explored.
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  4. 4
    071874

    Democratic Yemen.

    United Nations. Department of International Economic and Social Affairs. Population Division

    In: World population policies. Volume I. Afghanistan to France, [compiled by] United Nations. Department of International Economic and Social Affairs. Population Division. New York, New York, United Nations, 1987. 170-3. (Population Studies No. 102; ST/ESA/SER.A/102)

    Democratic Yemen's 1985 population of 2,137,000 is projected to grow to 5,870,000 by the year 2025. In 1985, 45.1% of the population was aged 0-14 years, while 4.6% were over the age of 60. 31.9% and 6.3% are projected to be in these respective age groups by the year 2025. The rate of natural increase will have declined from 29.6 to 18.4 over the period. Life expectancy should increase from 48.4 to 67.8 years, the crude death rate will decrease from 17.4 to 6.0, while infant mortality will decline from 134.9 to 38.2. The fertility rate will decline over the period from 6.8 to 2.8, with a corresponding drop in the crude birth rate from 47.0 to 24.4. Urban population will increase from 39.9% in 1985 to 67.4% overall by the year 2025. Population growth, immigration, and spatial distribution are considered to be acceptable by the government, while morbidity, mortality, fertility, and emigration are not. Democratic Yemen does not have an explicit population policy. Population issues are viewed within the framework of social and economic development, linked to policies designed to raise living standards, improve health care, lower growth and fertility, and settle certain segments of the population. Population policy as it relates to development objectives is discussed, followed by consideration of specific policies adopted and measures taken to address above-mentioned problematic demographic indicators. The status of women and population data systems are also explored.
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  5. 5
    071870

    Cyprus.

    United Nations. Department of International Economic and Social Affairs. Population Division

    In: World population policies. Volume I. Afghanistan to France, [compiled by] United Nations. Department of International Economic and Social Affairs. Population Division. New York, New York, United Nations, 1987. 154-7. (Population Studies No. 102; ST/ESA/SER.A/102)

    Cyprus' 1985 population of 669,000 is projected to grow to 902,000 by the year 2025. In 1985, 25.4% of the population was aged 0-14 years, while 13.4% were over the age of 60. 21.2% and 21.9% are projected to be in these respective age groups by the year 2025. The rate of natural increase will have declined from 12.2 to 4.7 over the period. Life expectancy should increase from 74.0 to 77.6 years, the crude death rate will increase from 8.5 to 9.4, while infant mortality will decline from 16.5 to 7.8. The fertility rate will decline over the period from 2.4 to 2.2, with a corresponding drop in the crude birth rate form 20.7 to 14.2. The 1976 female mean age at 1st marriage was 24.2 years. Urban population will increase form 49.5% in 1985 to 73.7% overall by the year 2025. Morbidity, mortality, immigration, emigration, and spatial distribution are considered to be acceptable by the government, while population growth and fertility are not. Cyprus has an explicit population policy. The government deems the population growth rate to be too low to eventually meet development objectives, and therefore seeks to reverse fertility declines. Additional objectives include the repatriation of Cypriots, further reduction in emigration, decelerating urbanization, and expanding the country's statistical base. Population policy as it relates to development objectives is discussed, followed by consideration of specific policies adopted and measures taken to address above-mentioned problematic demographic indicators. The status of women and population data systems are also explored.
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