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  1. 1
    181183
    Peer Reviewed

    Epidemiology of measles in the central region of Ghana: a five-year case review in three district hospitals.

    Bosu WK; Odoom S; Deiter P; Essel-Ahun M

    East African Medical Journal. 2003 Jun; 80(6):312-317.

    Objective: As part of a national accelerated campaign to eliminate measles, we conducted a study, to define the epidemiology of measles in the Central Region. Design: A descriptive survey was carried out on retrospective cases of measles. Setting: Patients were drawn from the three district hospitals (Assin, Asikuma and Winneba Hospitals) with the highest number of reported cases in the region. Subjects: Records of outpatient and inpatient measles patients attending the selected health facilities between 1996 and 2000. Data on reported measles eases in all health facilities in the three study, districts were also analysed. Main outcome measures: The distribution of measles eases in person (age and sex), time (weekly, or monthly, trends) anti place (residence), the relative frequency, of eases, and the outcome of treatment. Results: There was an overall decline in reported eases of measles between 1996 and 2000 both in absolute terms and relative to other diseases. Females constituted 48%- 52% of the reported 1508 eases in the hospitals. The median age of patients was 36 months. Eleven percent of eases were aged under nine months; 66% under five years and 96% under 15 years. With some minor variations between districts, the highest and lowest transmission occurred in March and September respectively. Within hospitals, there were sporadic outbreaks with up to 34 weekly eases. Conclusion: In Ghana, children aged nine months to 14 years could be appropriately targeted for supplementary, measles immunization campaigns. The best period for the campaigns is during the low transmission months of August to October. Retrospective surveillance can expediently inform decisions about the timing and target age groups for such campaigns. (author's)
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  2. 2
    048592

    [The Permanent Household Survey: provisional results, 1985] Enquete Permanente Aupres des Menages: resultats provisoires 1985

    Ivory Coast. Ministere de l'Economie et des Finances. Direction de la Statistique

    Abidjan, Ivory Coast, Ivory Coast. Ministere de l'Economie et des Finances. Direction de la Statistique, 1985. 76 p.

    This preliminary statistical report provides an overview of selected key economic and social indicators drawn from a data collection system recently implemented in the Ivory Coast. The Ivory Coast's Direction de la Statistique and the World Bank's Development Research Department are collaborating, under the auspices of the Bank's Living Standards Measurement Study, to interview 160 households per month on a continuous basis for 10 months out of the year. Data are collected concerning population size, age structure, sex distribution, family size, nationality, proportion of female heads of household, fertility, migration, health, education, type of residence, occupations, employment status, financial assistance among family members, and consumption. Annual statistical reports based on each round of the survey are to be published, along with brief semiannual updates.
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  3. 3
    084970

    Levels, age patterns and trends of sterility in selected countries South of the Sahara.

    Larsen U

    In: International Population Conference / Congres International de la Population, Montreal 1993, 24 August - 1st September. Volume 1, [compiled by] International Union for the Scientific Study of Population [IUSSP]. Liege, Belgium, IUSSP, 1993. 593-603.

    Using data collected in cooperation with the World Fertility Surveys (WFS) and the Demographic and Health Surveys (DHS) the aim was to determine the levels, age patterns, and trends of sterility in benin, Burundi, Cameroon, Ghana, Ivory Coast, Kenya, Lesotho, Liberia, Mali, Mauritania, Nigeria, Senegal, Sudan, Togo, and Uganda. In sub-Saharan Africa, 10 countries completed a WFS survey from 1977 to 1982. From 1986 to 1991 a DHS survey was carried out in 13 countries. In Sudan, Lesotho and Mauritania only ever married women were eligible for interview. All women (generally age 15-49) were eligible in the rest of the sub-Saharan countries. The selected samples included women who had been sexually active at least 5 years. Subsequently the levels and range patterns of sterility were estimated for each country and by produce within each country. The inhibiting effect of sterility on fertility was also assessed. Age-specific rates of sterility were estimated by the subsequently infertile estimator. At age 34, the proportions sterile reached .41 in Cameroon, .11 in Burundi, and intermediate levels in the rest of the countries. Burundi had the lowest prevalence of sterility at all ages, Cameroon had the highest up to about age 42, and at older ages Sudan and Lesotho ranked highest. In general, sterility rose moderately up to age 35 and then more rapidly after age 40. Sterility was particularly prevalent along major rivers, lakes, and coastal areas. Sterility was relatively high around Lake Victoria as well as in the Coast region of Kenya in 1977-78. Primary sterility was less than 3% in Burundi, Ghana, Kenya, Togo, and in Ondo state, Nigeria; 3-5% in Lesotho, Liberia, Mali, and Nigeria (1990), Senegal, Sudan (1989-90) and Uganda; and 5% or more in Cameroon, Nigeria (1981-82), and Sudan (1978-79). Differential disease patterns caused the most variation in age-specific rates of sterility. Under the hypothesis of Burundi levels of age specific sterility and unchanged fertility, and African woman in the age range from 20 to 44 would have an additional .5 to 2 children.
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  4. 4
    074860

    World population projections, 1989-90 edition: short-and long-term estimates.

    Bulatao RA; Bos E; Stephens PW; Vu MT

    Baltimore, Maryland, Johns Hopkins University Press, 1990. lxxiii, 421 p.

    The World Bank's Population and Human Resources Department regularly publishes a set of world population projections based on its data files. This 1989-90 report has projections for the world and for regions, income groups of countries, and 187 countries. World Bank staff made projections to the point where populations reach stability. In almost all cases, they made only 1 projection. Projection tables for 1985-2030 exist for each country's population. Each country also has tables on birth rate, death rate, net migration, natural increase, population growth, total fertility rate, life expectancy, infant mortality rate, and dependency ratio. The report shows that from 1985-90 population growth was 1.74%, and projected 1990 world population size was 5.3 billion. By 2025, 84.1% of the world's population will be living in developing countries. 58% of the population now lives in Asia. The population of Africa is growing faster than that of Asia, however, (3 vs. 1.9%). By 2000, the population of Africa will be second only to that of Asia, yet in 1989-1990, it is behind that of Asia, Europe and the USSR, and the Americas. The current dependency ratio (67) is expected to decline to 53 by 2025. The highest current dependency ratio belongs to Kenya (120). In developed countries with aging populations, the dependency ratio will rise from 50-58. China will most likely to continue to be the most populous country for about 200 years. India will continue to contribute more to population growth than any other country in the world. Yet the Federal Republic of Germany loses 100,000 people yearly. Total fertility rates are the greatest in Rwanda, the Yemen Arab Republic, Kenya, Malawi, and the Ivory Coast (all >7.2). Afghanistan and 3 western African countries have the shortest life expectancies (about 40 years). These trends illustrate the need to alter population growth.
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  5. 5
    071961

    Nigeria.

    United Nations. Department of International Economic and Social Affairs. Population Division

    In: World population policies. Volume II. Gabon to Norway, [compiled by] United Nations. Department of International Economic and Social Affairs. Population Division. New York, New York, United Nations, 1989. 218-21. (Population Studies No. 102/Add.1; ST/ESA/SER.A/102/Add.1)

    Nigeria's 1985 population of 95,198,000 is projected to grow to 338,105,000 by the year 2025. In 1985, 48.3% of the population was aged 0-14 years, while 4.0% were over the age of 60. 38.8% and 4.6% are projected to be in these respective age groups by the year 2025. The rate of natural increase will have declined from 33.3 to 22.7 over the period. Life expectancy should increase from 48.5 to 64.5 years, the crude death rate will decrease from 17.1 to 6.8, while infant mortality will decline from 114.2 to 48.5. The fertility rate will decline over the period from 7.1 to 3.6, with a corresponding drop in the crude birth rate from 50.4 to 29.5. The 1981/2 contraceptive prevalence rate was 5.0, while the 1981/2 female mean age at 1st marriage was 18.7 years. Urban population will increase from 23.0% in 1985 to 53.0% overall by the year 2025. Immigration and emigration are considered to be acceptable by the government, while population growth, morbidity, mortality, fertility, and spatial distribution are not. Nigeria has an explicit population policy. It aims to reduce population growth, fertility, morbidity, mortality, and the rate of urbanization. Specific efforts to effect these changes include providing for family planning and maternal-child health, education, rural and urban development, enhanced women's status, and greater male responsibility. Population policy as it relates to development objectives is discussed, followed by consideration of specific policies adopted and measures taken to address above-mentioned problematic demographic indicators. The status of women and population data systems are also explored.
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  6. 6
    071960

    Niger.

    United Nations. Department of International Economic and Social Affairs. Population Division

    In: World population policies. Volume II. Gabon to Norway, [compiled by] United Nations. Department of International Economic and Social Affairs. Population Division. New York, New York, United Nations, 1989. 214-7. (Population Studies No. 102/Add.1; ST/ESA/SER.A/102/Add.1)

    Niger's 1985 population of 6,115,000 is projected to grow to 18,940,000 by the year 2025. In 1985, 46.7% of the population was aged 0-14 years, while 4.9% were over the age of 60. 38.0% and 4.8% are projected to be in these respective age groups by the year 2025. The rate of natural increase will have declined from 28.1 to 20.3 over the period. Life expectancy should increase from 42.5 to 58.5 years, the crude death rate will decrease from 22.9 to 9.4, while infant mortality will decline from 145.7 to 70.9. The fertility rate will decline over the period from 7.1 to 3.6, with a corresponding drop in the crude birth rate from 51.0 to 29.7. The 1959 female mean age at 1st marriage was 15.8 years. Urban population will increase from 16.2% in 1985 to 46.6% overall by the year 2025. Immigration and emigration are considered to be acceptable by the government, while population growth, morbidity, mortality, fertility, and spatial distribution are not. Niger does not have an explicit population policy. Efforts have, however, been taken to improve health care, education, food supply, overall living conditions, and spatial distribution. Rural areas receive particular attention. Population policy as it relates to development objectives is discussed, followed by consideration of specific policies adopted and measures taken to address above-mentioned problematic demographic indicators. The status of women and population data systems are also explored.
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  7. 7
    071954

    Mozambique.

    United Nations. Department of International Economic and Social Affairs. Population Division

    In: World population policies. Volume II. Gabon to Norway, [compiled by] United Nations. Department of International Economic and Social Affairs. Population Division. New York, New York, United Nations, 1989. 190-3. (Population Studies No. 102/Add.1; ST/ESA/SER.A/102/Add.1)

    Mozambique's 1985 population of 13,961,000 is projected to grow to 37,154,000 by the year 2025. In 1985, 43.2% of the population was aged 0-14 years, while 5.3% were over the age of 60. 34.1% and 6.4% are projected to be in these respective age groups by the year 2025. The rate of natural increase will have declined from 25.4 to 16.8 over the period. Life expectancy should increase from 45.3 to 61.3 years, the crude death rate will decrease from 19.7 to 8.7, while infant mortality will decline from 153.5 to 71.6. The fertility rate will decline over the period from 6.1 to 3.0, with a corresponding drop in the crude birth rate from 45.1 to 25.5. The 1980 female mean age at 1st marriage was 17.6 years. Urban population will increase from 19.4% in 1985 to 52.6% overall by the year 2025. Population growth, fertility, immigration, and emigration are considered to be acceptable by the government, while morbidity, mortality, and spatial distribution are not. Mozambique does not have an explicit population policy. General attention has been given to economic and social restructuring, reducing morbidity and mortality through primary health care, and adjusting spatial distribution. Population policy as it relates to development objectives is discussed, followed by consideration of specific policies adopted and measures taken to address above-mentioned problematic demographic indicators. The status of women and population data systems are also explored.
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  8. 8
    071953

    Morocco.

    United Nations. Department of International Economic and Social Affairs. Population Division

    In: World population policies. Volume II. Gabon to Norway, [compiled by] United Nations. Department of International Economic and Social Affairs. Population Division. New York, New York, United Nations, 1989. 186-9. (Population Studies No. 102/Add.1; ST/ESA/SER.A/102/Add.1)

    Morocco's 1985 population of 21,941,000 is projected to grow to 40,062,000 by the year 2025. In 1985, 41.0% of the population was aged 0-14 years, while 5.7% were over the age of 60. 23.3% and 12.2% are projected to be in these respective age groups by the year 2025. The rate of natural increase will have declined from 25.1 to 10.3 over the period. Life expectancy should increase from 58.3 to 72.8 years, the crude death rate will decrease from 11.3 to 6.4, while infant mortality will decline from 96.5 to 23.5. The fertility rate will decline over the period from 5.1 to 2.2, with a corresponding drop in the crude birth rate from 36.4 to 16.7. The 1983/4 contraceptive prevalence rate was 26.0, while the 1982 female mean age at 1st marriage was 22.3 years. Urban population will increase form 44.8% in 1985 to 71.0% overall by the year 2025. Insignificant immigration is considered to be acceptable by the government, while population growth, morbidity, mortality, fertility, spatial distribution, and low emigration are not. Morocco does not have an explicit population policy. Other policies of intervention are, however, in place to lower population growth and fertility, adjust spatial distribution, and reduce infant mortality. Population policy as it relates to development objectives is discussed, followed by consideration of specific policies adopted and measures taken to address above-mentioned problematic demographic indicators. The status of women and population data systems are also explored.
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  9. 9
    071888

    Gambia.

    United Nations. Department of International Economic and Social Affairs. Population Division

    In: World population policies. Volume II. Gabon to Norway, [compiled by] United Nations. Department of International Economic and Social Affairs. Population Division. New York, New York, United Nations, 1989. 6-9. (Population Studies No. 102/Add.1; ST/ESA/SER.A/102/Add.1)

    Gambia's 1985 population off 643,000 is projected to grow to 1,494,000 by the year 2025. In 1985, 42.5% of the population was aged 0-14 years, while 5.0% were over the age of 60. 36.4% and 5.9% are projected to be in these respective age groups by the year 2025. The rate of natural increase will have declined from 19.4 to 15.6 over the period. Life expectancy should increase from 35.0 to 51.0 years, the crude death rate will decrease from 29.0 to 13.8, while infant mortality will decline from 174.1 to 93.8. The fertility rate will decline over the period from 6.4 to 3.6, with a corresponding drop in the crude birth rate from 48.4 to 29.3. The 1977 contraceptive prevalence rate was 1.0. Urban population will increase from 20.1% in 1985 to 48.4% overall by the year 2025. Emigration is considered to be acceptable by the government, while population growth, morbidity, mortality, fertility, immigration, and spatial distribution are not. Gambia has an explicit population policy. It aims to directly intervene to reduce population growth by lowering fertility, mortality, immigration, and rural-urban migration. Measures will include a combined approach of family planning and maternal-child health services, rural development, and employment programs. Population policy as it relates to development objectives is discussed, followed by consideration of specific policies adopted and measures taken to address above-mentioned problematic demographic indicators. The status of women and population data systems are also explored.
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  10. 10
    071887

    Gabon.

    United Nations. Department of International Economic and Social Affairs. Population Division

    In: World population policies. Volume II. Gabon to Norway, [compiled by] United Nations. Department of International Economic and Social Affairs. Population Division. New York, New York, United Nations, 1989. 2-5. (Population Studies No. 102/Add.1; ST/ESA/SER.A/102/Add.1)

    Gabon's 1985 population of 1,151,000 is projected to grow to 2,607,000 by the year 2025. In 1985, 34.6% of the population was aged 0-14 years, while 9.4% were over the age of 60. 33.5% and 8.1% are projected to be in these respective age groups by the year 2025. The rate of natural increase will have grown from 15.7 to 17.0 over the period. Life expectancy should increase from 49.0 to 65.0 years, the crude birth rate will decrease from 18.1 to 8.5, while infant mortality will decline from 111.9 to 46.7. The fertility rate will decline over the period from 4.5 to 3.0, with a corresponding drop in the crude birth rate from 33.8 to 25.4. The 1960 female mean age at 1st marriage was 17.7 years. Urban population will increase from 40.9% in 1985 to 69.6% overall by the year 2025. None of these trends and indicators are considered to be acceptable by the government. Gabon has an explicit population policy. Its aims to increase the rate of population growth in order to enlarge the labor pool. Attempting to create an environment conducive to developing larger families, efforts focus upon improving conditions of family welfare and population distribution. Population policy as it relates to development objectives is discussed, followed by consideration of specific policies adopted and measures taken to address above-mentioned problematic demographic indicators. The status of women and population data systems are also explored.
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  11. 11
    071883

    Ethiopia.

    United Nations. Department of International Economic and Social Affairs. Population Division

    In: World population policies. Volume I. Afghanistan to France, [compiled by] United Nations. Department of International Economic and Social Affairs. Population Division. New York, New York, United Nations, 1987. 206-9. (Population Studies No. 102; ST/ESA/SER.A/102)

    Ethiopia's 1985 population of 43,557,000 is projected to grown to 122,285,000 by the year 2025. In 1985, 44.8% of the population was aged 0-14 years, while 4.4% were over the age of 60. 37.6% and 5.3% are projected to be in these respective age groups by the year 2025. The rate of natural increase will have declined from 26.5 to 18.9 over the period. Life expectancy should increase from 40.9 to 55.9 years, the crude death rate will decrease from 23.2 to 11.0, while infant mortality will decline from 154.9 to 81.5. the fertility rate will decline over the period from 6.7 to 3.6, with a corresponding drop in the crude birth rate from 49.7 to 29.9. The 1981 contraceptive prevalence rate was 2.0, while the 1981 female mean age at 1st marriage was 17.7 years. Urban population will increase from 11.6% in 1985 or 33.8% overall by the year 2025. Immigration and emigration are considered to be acceptable by the government, while population growth, morbidity, mortality, fertility, and spatial distribution are not. Ethiopia does not have an explicit population policy. Government policy instead focuses upon improving health and adjusting spatial distribution. Population policy as it relates to development objectives is discussed, followed by consideration of specific policies adopted and measured taken to address above-mentioned problematic demographic indicators. The status of women and population data systems are also explored.
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  12. 12
    071861

    Chad.

    United Nations. Department of International Economic and Social Affairs. Population Division

    In: World population policies. Volume I. Afghanistan to France, [compiled by] United Nations. Department of International Economic and Social Affairs. Population Division. New York, New York, United Nations, 1987. 118-21. (Population Studies No. 102; ST/ESA/SER.A/102)

    Chad's 1985 population of 5,018,000 is projected to grow to 12,356,000 by the year 2025. In 1985, 42.3% of the population was aged 0-14 years, while 5.8% were over the age of 60. 34.0% and 6.5% are projected to be in these respective age groups by the year 2025. The rate of natural increase will have declined from 22.8 to 15.9 over the period. Life expectancy should increase from 43.0 to 59.0 years, the crude death rate will decrease from 21.4 to 9.8, while infant mortality will decline from 142.8 to 68.9. The fertility rate will decline over the period from 5.9 to 2.9, with a corresponding drop in the crude birth rate from 44.2 to 25.7. The 1977 contraceptive prevalence rate was 1.0, while the 1963 female mean age at 1st marriage was 16.5 years. Urban population will increase from 27.0% in 1985 to 62.5% overall by the year 2025. Population growth, fertility, immigration, emigration, and, in part, spatial distribution are considered to be acceptable by the government, while morbidity and mortality are not. Chad does not have an explicit population policy. Official attention has been limited to efforts to reduce morbidity and mortality in the country. Successive governments have attempted to improve maternal and child health, the quality of life of the poorest segments of the population, and nutrition. Further, steps have been taken to integrate women into the development process, lower mortality, and check emigration from rural areas. Population policy as it relates to development objectives is discussed, followed by consideration of specific policies adopted and measures taken to address above mentioned problematic demographic indicators. The status of women and population data systems are also explored.
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  13. 13
    071860

    Central African Republic.

    United Nations. Department of International Economic and Social Affairs. Population Division

    In: World population policies. Volume I. Afghanistan to France, [compiled by] United Nations. Department of International Economic and Social Affairs. Population Division. New York, New York, United Nations, 1987. 114-7. (Population Studies No. 102; ST/ESA/SER.A/102)

    The Central Africa Republic's 1985 population of 2,576,000 is projected to grow to 6,339,000 buy the year 2025. In 1985, 42.5% of the population was aged 0-14 years, while 6.1% were over the age of 60. 33.9% and 6.4% are projected to be in these respective age groups by the year 2025. The rate of natural increase will have declined from 22.8 to 15.4 over the period. Life expectancy should increase from 43.0 to 59.0 years, the crude death rate will decrease from 21.8 to 9.7, while infant mortality will decline from 142.0 to 68.9. The fertility rate will decline over the period from 5.9 to 2.9, with a corresponding drop in the crude birth rate from 44.6 to 25.2. The 1975 female mean age at 1st marriage was 18.4 years. Urban population will increase from 42.4% in 1985 to 70.1% in overall by the year 2025. Immigration, emigration, and, in part, spatial distribution are considered to be acceptable by the government, while too high population growth, morbidity, mortality, and fertility are not. The Republic does not have an explicit population policy. The government does not intervene to check population growth, and generally attributes population problems to government practices in the 1970s. Policies focus upon improving the quality of life, reducing infant and child mortality, and adjusting spatial distribution. Population policy as it relates to development objectives is discussed, followed by consideration of specific policies adopted and measures taken to address above-mentioned problematic demographic indicators. The status of women and population data systems are also explored.
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  14. 14
    071859

    Cape Verde.

    United Nations. Department of International Economic and Social Affairs. Population Division

    In: World population policies. Volume I. Afghanistan to France, [compiled by] United Nations. Department of International Economic and Social Affairs. Population Division. New York, New York, United Nations, 1987. 110-3. (Population Studies No. 102; ST/ESA/SER.A/102)

    Cape Verde's 1985 population of 326,000 is projected to grow to 712,000 by the year 2025. In 1985, 41.1% of the population was aged 0-14 years, while 6.8% were over the age of 60. 24.9% and 9.7% are projected to be in these respective age groups by the year 2025. The rate of natural increase will have declined from 19.4 to 12.8 over the period. Life expectancy should increase from 59,0 to 74.3 years, the crude birth death rate will decrease from 11.4 to 4.4, while infant mortality will decline from 74.7 to 14.9. The fertility rate will decline over the period from 4.8 to 2.1, with a corresponding drop in the crude birth rate from 30.9 to 17.1. Urban population will increase from 5.3% in 1985 to 19.5% overall by the year 2025. Population growth, fertility, immigration, and emigration are considered to be acceptable by the government, while morbidity, mortality, and spatial distribution are not. Cape Verde does not have an explicit population policy. The government has, however, acknowledged the need for family planning to help bring population more in line with available resources. Rural development is a central government focus. Population policy as it related to development objectives is discussed, followed by consideration of specific policies adopted and measures taken to address above-mentioned problematic demographic indicators. The status of women and population data systems are also explored.
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  15. 15
    071857

    Cameroon.

    United Nations. Department of International Economic and Social Affairs. Population Division

    In: World population policies. Volume I. Afghanistan to France, [compiled by] United Nations. Department of International Economic and Social Affairs. Population Division. New York, New York, United Nations, 1987. 102-5. (Population Studies No. 102; ST/ESA/SER.A/102)

    Cameroon's 1985 population of 9,873,00 is projected to grow to 27,763,000 by the year 2025. In 1985, 43.3% of the population was aged 0-14 years, while 6.1% were over the age of 60. 34.6% and 6.5% are projected to be in these respective age groups by the year 2025. The rate of natural increase will have declined from 27.0 to 18.3 over the period. Life expectancy should increase from 50.9 to 66.9 years, the crude death rate will decrease from 15.8 to 6.5, while infant mortality will decline from 103.2 to 40.2. The fertility rate will decline over the period from 5.8 to 2.9, with a corresponding drop in the crude birth rate from 42.9 to 24.8. The 1978 contraceptive prevalence rate was 2.0, while the 1976 female mean age at 1st marriage was 18.8 years. Urban population will increase from 42.4% in 1985 to 73.9% overall by the year 2025. Immigration, emigration, and, in part, spatial distribution are considered to be acceptable by the government, while population growth, mortality, morbidity, and fertility are not. Cameroon does not have an explicit population policy. Of greater concern to the government are policies and efforts to reduce mortality and rural to urban migration. Direct measures to reduce fertility and lower population growth are considered inefficient and therefore not taken by the government. Population policy as it relates to development objectives is discussed, followed by consideration of specific policies adopted and measures taken to address above-mentioned problematic demographic indicators. The status of women and population data systems are also explored.
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  16. 16
    071855

    Burundi.

    United Nations. Department of International Economic and Social Affairs. Population Division

    In: World population policies. Volume I. Afghanistan to France, [compiled by] United Nations. Department of International Economic and Social Affairs. Population Division. New York, New York, United Nations, 1987. 94-7. (Population Studies No. 102; ST/ESA/SER.A/102)

    Burundi's 1985 population of 4,721,000 is projected to grown to 11,817,000 by the year 2025. In 1985, 44.8% of the population was aged 0-14 years, while 5.4% were over the age of 60. 30.3% and 6.5% are projected to be in these respective age groups by the year 2025. The rate of natural increase will have declined from 28.2 to 13.7 over the period. Life expectancy should increase from 46.5 to 62.5 years, the crude death rate will decrease from 19.0 to 8.1, while infant mortality will decline from 124.1 to 55.6. The fertility rate will decline over the period from 6.4 to 2.4, with a corresponding drop in the crude birth rate from 47.2 to 21.9. The 1977 contraceptive prevalence rate was 1.0, while the 1979 female mean age at 1st marriage was 20.8 years. Urban population will increase from 8.2% in 1985 to 41.2% overall by the year 2025. Immigration, emigration, and spatial distribution are considered to be acceptable by the government, while population growth, morbidity, mortality, and fertility are not. Burundi does not have an explicit population policy. The government has, however, developed programs to lower fertility and mortality and to adjust spatial distribution. A lack of reliable population data, qualified personnel, and appropriate government institutions have been important causal factors behind the failure to develop a comprehensive population policy despite governmental interest in lowering population growth. Population policy as it relates to development objectives is discussed, followed by consideration of specific policies adopted and measures taken to address above mentioned problematic demographic indicators. The status of women and population data systems are also explored.
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  17. 17
    071853

    Burkina Faso.

    United Nations. Department of International Economic and Social Affairs. Population Division

    In: World population policies. Volume I. Afghanistan to France, [compiled by] United Nations. Department of International Economic and Social Affairs. Population Division. New York, New York, United Nations, 1987. 86-9. (Population Studies No. 102; ST/ESA/SER.A/102)

    Burkina Faso's 1985 population of 6,942,000 is projected to grown to 20,106,000 by the year 2025. In 1985, 43.9% of the population was aged 0-14 years, while 4.8% were over the age of 60. 37.3% and 5.7% are projected to be in these respective age groups by the year 2025. The rate of natural increase will have declined from 27.7 to 20.4 over the period. Life expectancy should increase from 45.2 to 61.2 years, the crude death rate will decrease from 20.1 to 8.7, while infant mortality will decline from 150.3 to 74.1. The fertility rate will decline over the period from 6.5 to 3.6, with a corresponding drop in the crude birth rate from 47.8 to 29.0. The 1975 female mean age at 1st marriage was 17.4 years. Urban population will increase from 7.9% in 1985 to 27.3% overall by the year 2025. Population growth, fertility, immigration, and emigration are considered to be acceptable by the government, while morbidity, mortality, and spatial distribution are not. Burkina Faso does not have an explicit population policy. Concern is generally focused upon high morbidity and mortality, poor spatial distribution, and emigration patterns as they relate to the population's health and well-being. Population policy as it related to development objectives is discussed, followed by consideration of specific policies adopted and measures taken to address above-mentioned problematic demographic indicators. The status of women and population data systems are also explored.
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  18. 18
    071849

    Botswana.

    United Nations. Department of International Economic and Social Affairs. Population Division

    In: World population policies. Volume I. Afghanistan to France, [compiled by] United Nations. Department of International Economic and Social Affairs. Population Division. New York, New York, United Nations, 1987. 70-3. (Population Studies No. 102; ST/ESA/SER.A/102)

    Botswana's 1985 population of 1,107,000 is projected to grown to 4,151,000 by the year 2025. In 1985, 49.1% of the population was aged 0-14 years, while 3.4% were over the age of 60. 39.0% and 5.0% are projected to be in these respective age groups by the year 2025. The rate of natural increase will have declined from 37.3 to 24.1 over the period. Life expectancy should increase from 54.5 to 69.5 years, the crude death rate will decrease from 12.6 to 4.9, while infant mortality will decline from 76.2 to 21.7. The fertility rate will decline over the period from 6.5 to 3.6, with a corresponding drop in the crude birth rate from 49.9 to 29.0. The 1984 contraceptive prevalence rate was 28.0, while the 1981 female mean age at 1st marriage was 26.4 years. Urban population will increase from 19.2% in 1985 to 53.0% overall by the year 2025. Immigration and emigration are considered to be acceptable by the government, while population growth, mortality, fertility, and spatial distribution are not. Botswana does not have an explicit population policy. Improved family well-being is, however, sought through policies designed to improve health and indirectly modify fertility. Population policy as it related to development objectives, is discussed, followed by consideration of specific policies adopted and measures taken to address above-mentioned problematic demographic indicators. The status of women and population data systems are also explored.
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  19. 19
    071848

    Benin.

    United Nations. Department of International Economic and Social Affairs. Population Division

    In: World population policies. Volume I. Afghanistan to France, [compiled by] United Nations. Department of International Economic and Social Affairs. Population Division. New York, New York, United Nations, 1987. 58-61. (Population Studies No. 102; ST/ESA/SER.A/102)

    Benin's 1985 population of 4,050,000 is projected to grow to 12,701,000 by the year 2025. In 1985, 46.8% of the population was aged 0-14 years, while 4.6% were over the age of 60. 37.6% and 4.9% are projected to be in these respective age groups by the year 2025. The rate of natural increase will have declined from 29.5 to 20.1 over the period. Life expectancy should increase from 44.0 to 60.0 years, the crude death rate will decrease from 21.2 to 8.7, while infant mortality will decline from 120.1 to 52.7. The fertility rate will decline over the period from 7.0 to 3.4, with a corresponding drop in the crude birth rate from 50.7 to 28.8. The 1982 contraceptive prevalence rate was 9.0, while the 1982 female mean age at 1st marriage was 18.3 years. Urban population will increase from 35.2% in 1985 to 68.9% overall by the year 2025. Population growth, fertility, and immigration are considered to be acceptable by the government, while morbidity, mortality, emigration, and spatial distribution are not. Benin does not have an explicit population policy. While the government has intervened to reduce mortality, morbidity, emigration, and adjust spatial distribution, general emphasis is placed upon improving health services, food, and education. Population policy as it related to development objectives is discussed, followed by consideration of specific policies adopted and measures taken to address above-mentioned problematic demographic indicators. The status of women and population data systems are also explored.
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  20. 20
    071949

    Mauritius.

    United Nations. Department of International Economic and Social Affairs. Population Division

    In: World population policies. Volume II. Gabon to Norway, [compiled by] United Nations. Department of International Economic and Social Affairs. Population Division. New York, New York, United Nations, 1989. 170-3. (Population Studies No. 102/Add.1; ST/ESA/SER.A/102/Add.1)

    Mauritius' 1985 population of 1,050,000 is projected to grow to 1,606,000 by the year 2025. In 1985, 31.6% of the population was aged 0-14 years, while 5.7% were over the age of 60. 21.2% and 17.8% are projected to be in these respective age groups by the year 2025. The rate of natural increase will have declined from 19.5 to 5.9 over the period. Life expectancy should increase from 66.7 to 74/2 years, the crude death rate will increase from 6.0 to 8.6, while infant mortality will decline from 28.4 to 8.5. The fertility rate will decline over the period from 2.8 to 2.1, with a corresponding drop in the crude birth rate from 25.5 to 14.5. The 1985 contraceptive prevalence rate was 75.0, while the 1983 female mean age at 1st marriage was 21.7 years. Urban population will increase from 42.2% in 1985 to 62.7% overall by the year 2025. Insignificant immigration is considered to be acceptable by the government, while population growth, morbidity, mortality, fertility, emigration, and spatial distribution are not. Mauritius has an explicit population policy. It aims to decrease population growth by reducing fertility. Specific efforts include providing family planning services, improving women's status, and increasing females' minimum marriage age from 15 to 18 years. Population policy as it relates to development objectives is discussed, followed by consideration of specific policies adopted and measures taken to address above-mentioned problematic demographic indicators. The status of women and population data systems are also explored.
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  21. 21
    071896

    Guinea-Bissau.

    United Nations. Department of International Economic and Social Affairs. Population Division

    In: World population policies. Volume II. Gabon to Norway, [compiled by] United Nations. Department of International Economic and Social Affairs. Population Division. New York, New York, United Nations, 1989. 38-41. (Population Studies No. 102/Add.1; ST/ESA/SER.A/102/Add.1)

    Guinea-Bissau's 1985 population of 889,000 is projected to grow to 2,014,000 by the year 2025. In 1985, 40.7% of the population was aged 0-14 years, while 6.8% were over the age of 60. 34.6% and 7.0% are projected to be in these respective age groups by the year 2025. The rate of natural increase will have declined from 19.1 to 17.1 over the period. Life expectancy should increase from 43.0 to 59.0 years, the crude death rate will decrease from 21.7 to 10.4, while infant mortality will decline from 142.8 to 68.9. The fertility rate will decline over the period from 5.4 to 3.3, with a corresponding drop in the crude birth rate from 40.7 to 27.5. The 1950 female mean age at 1st marriage was 18.3 years. Urban population will increase from 27.1% in 1985 to 57.7% overall by the year 2025. Population growth, fertility, immigration, emigration, and spatial distribution are considered to be acceptable by the government, while morbidity and mortality are not. Guinea-Bissau does not have an explicit population policy. Linking population problems to development concerns, the government aims to reduce high morbidity and mortality, and adjust spatial distribution to be more in line with the country's development goals. Population policy as it relates to development objectives is discussed, followed by consideration of specific policies adopted and measures taken to address above-mentioned problematic demographic indicators. The status of women and population data systems are also explored.
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  22. 22
    071895

    Guinea.

    United Nations. Department of International Economic and Social Affairs. Population Division

    In: World population policies. Volume II. Gabon to Norway, [compiled by] United Nations. Department of International Economic and Social Affairs. Population Division. New York, New York, United Nations, 1989. 34-7. (Population Studies No. 102/Add.1; ST/ESA/SER.A/102/Add.1)

    Guinea's 1985 population of 6,075,000 is projected to grow to 15,561,000 by the year 2025. In 1985, 43.1% of the population was aged 0-14 years, while 4.9% were over the age of 60. 36.5% and 5.9% are projected to be in these respective age groups by the year 2025. The rate of natural increase will have declined from 23.3 to 17.4 over the period. Life expectancy should increase from 40.2 to 56.2 years, the crude death rate will decrease from 23.5 to 11.1, while infant mortality will decline from 159.1 to 80.2. The fertility rate will decline over the period from 6.2 to 3.4, with a corresponding drop in the crude birth rate from 46.8 to 28.5. The 1977 contraceptive prevalence rate was 1.0, while the 1955 female mean age at 1st marriage was 16.0 years. Urban population will increase from 22.2% in 1985 to 52.8% overall by the year 2025. Population growth, immigration, and spatial distribution are considered to be acceptable by the government, while morbidity, mortality, fertility, and emigration are not. Guinea has an explicit population policy. It aims to reform the health care system, reduce emigration, and rehabilitate rural areas. Such approaches are considered more effective than family planning in solving population problems. Population policy as it relates to development objectives is discussed, followed by consideration of specific policies adopted and measures taken to address above-mentioned problematic demographic indicators. The status of women and population data systems are also explored.
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  23. 23
    071891

    Ghana.

    United Nations. Department of International Economic and Social Affairs. Population Division

    In: World population policies. Volume II. Gabon to Norway, [compiled by] United Nations. Department of International Economic and Social Affairs. Population Division. New York, New York, United Nations, 1989. 18-21. (Population Studies No. 102/Add.1; ST/ESA/SER.A/102/Add.1)

    Ghana's 1985 population of 13,588,000 is projected to grow to 47,020,000 by the year 2025. In 1985, 46.7% of the population was aged 0-14 years, while 4.5% were over the age of 60. 38.7% and 5.2% are projected to be in these respective age groups by the year 2025. The rate of natural increase will have declined from 32.2 to 23.0 over the period. Life expectancy should increase from 52.0 to 67.5 years, the crude death rate will decrease from 14.6 to 5.8, while infant mortality will decline from 98.3 to 37.1. The fertility rate will decline from 98.3 to 37.1. The fertility rate will decline over the period from 6.5 to 3.6, with a corresponding drop in the crude birth rate from 46.9 to 28.9. The 1979 contraceptive prevalence rate was 10.0, while the 1971 female mean age at 1st marriage was 19.4 years. Urban population will increase from 31.5% in 1985 to 56.6% overall by the year 2025. Insignificant emigration is considered to be acceptable by the government, while population growth, morbidity, mortality, fertility, immigration, and spatial distribution are not. Ghana has an explicit population policy. Emphasizing positive demographic change through the reduction of fertility, policy also directly and indirectly addresses each of the above areas. Population policy as it relates to development objectives is discussed, followed by consideration of specific policies adopted and measures take to address above-mentioned problematic demographic indicators. The status of women and population data systems are also explored.
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  24. 24
    071882

    Equatorial Guinea.

    United Nations. Department of International Economic and Social Affairs. Population Division

    In: World population policies. Volume I. Afghanistan to France, [compiled by] United Nations. Department of International Economic and Social Affairs. Population Division. New York, New York, United Nations, 1987. 202-5. (Population Studies No. 102; ST/ESA/SER.A/102)

    Equatorial Guinea's 1985 population of 392,000 is projected to grow to 937,000 by the year 2025. In 1985, 41.4% of the population was aged 0-14 years, while 6.6% were over the age of 60. 34.0% and 6.8% are projected to be in these respective age groups by the year 2025. The rate of natural increase will have declined from 21.5 to 15.9 over the period. Life expectancy should increase from 44.0 to 60.0 years, the crude death rate will decrease from 21.0 to 9.5, while infant mortality will decline from 137.3 to 65.0. The fertility rate will decline over the period from 5.7 to 3.0, with a corresponding drop in the crude birth rate from 42.5 to 25.5. Urban population will increase from 59.7% in 1985 to 81.2% overall by the year 2025. Emigration is considered to be acceptable by the government, while too low population growth and fertility, morbidity, mortality, immigration, and spatial distribution are not. Equatorial Guinea has an explicit population policy. The country having suffered a decline in population size from immigration over the period 1968-79, government policy is to increase population growth through direct and indirect intervention. Population programs address the areas of health, education, social security, housing, labor, and communication. Population policy as it relates to development objectives is discussed, followed by consideration of specific policies adopted and measures taken to address above-mentioned problematic demographic indicators. The status of women and population data systems are also explored.
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  25. 25
    071880

    Egypt.

    United Nations. Department of International Economic and Social Affairs. Population Division

    In: World population policies. Volume I. Afghanistan to France, [compiled by] United Nations. Department of International Economic and Social Affairs. Population Division. New York, New York, United Nations, 1987. 194-7. (Population Studies No. 102; ST/ESA/SER.A/102)

    Egypt's 1985 population of 46,909,000 is projected to grow to 90,399,000 by the year 2025. In 1985, 39.6% of the population was aged 0-14 years, while 6.2% were over the age of 60. 24.4% and 11.7% are projected to be in these respective age groups by the year 2025. The rate of natural increase will have declined from 25.1 to 10.5 over the period. Life expectancy should increase from 58.1 to 72.7 years, the crude death rate will decrease from 11.6 to 6.4, while infant mortality will decline from 100.1 to 24.0. The fertility rate will decline over the period from 4.8 to 2.2, with a corresponding drop in the crude birth rate from 36.6 to 17.0. The 1984 contraceptive prevalence rate was 30.0. Urban population will increase from 46.4% in 1985 to 70.8% overall by the year 2025. Immigration and emigration are considered to be acceptable by the government, while high population growth, morbidity, mortality, fertility, and spatial distribution are not. Egypt has an explicit population policy. Combining social and economic policy, the government directly intervenes to decrease population growth by reducing fertility and increasing emigration. Other objectives include adjusting patterns of spatial distribution and providing primary health care. Population policy as it relates to development objectives is discussed, followed by consideration of specific policies adopted and measures taken to address above-mentioned problematic demographic indicators. The status of women and population data systems are also explored.
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