Your search found 223 Results

  1. 1
    375880

    Strengthening health systems to respond to women subjected to intimate partner violence or sexual violence: a manual for health managers.

    World Health Organization [WHO]

    Geneva, Switzerland, WHO, 2017. 172 p.

    This manual is intended for health managers at all levels of the health systems. The manual is based on the World Health Organization (WHO) guideline Responding to intimate partner violence and sexual violence against women: WHO clinical and policy guidelines, 2013. Those guidelines inform this manual and its companion clinical handbook for healthcare providers, Health care for women subjected to intimate partner violence or sexual violence, 2014. The manual draws on the WHO health systems building blocks as outlined in Everybody’s business: strengthening health systems to improve health outcomes: WHO’s framework for action..
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  2. 2
    323649

    Casting light on old shadows: Ending sexually transmitted infection epidemics as public health concerns by 2030.

    World Health Organization [WHO]. Department of Reproductive Health and Research

    Geneva Switzerland, World Health Organization [WHO], 2017. 8 p. (Advocacy Brief; WHO/RHR/17.17)

    Countries can boost the response to STIs and improve the health of millions of women, men and adolescents by adopting WHO’s Global STI Strategy. Some viral STIs, like human papillomavirus (HPV) and HIV, are still incurable and can be deadly, while some bacterial STIs – like chlamydia, gonorrhoea, syphilis and trichomoniasis – are curable if detected and treated. This brief provide milestones and targets and five strategic directions for countries to develop their own national plans.
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  3. 3
    374612

    Making social protection gender-responsive: lessons from UN Women’s work in the Eastern Caribbean.

    United Nations. UN Women

    New York, New York, UN Women, [2017]. 4 p. (Policy Brief No. 7)

    There is broad-based agreement today that universal social protection systems are a desirable goal. For gender equality advocates, it is paramount to take advantage of this momentum to ensure that such systems benefit women by responding to their rights and needs. Well-designed social protection systems can narrow gender gaps in poverty rates, enhance women’s income security and access to personal income, and provide a lifeline for poor women, especially single mothers.1 The current context of economic stagnation and fiscal adjustment, however, places big constraints on the investments needed to achieve these goals. How can gender equality advocates engage with social protection advocacy in this context? This policy brief showcases the strategies that were used by UN Women’s Multi-Country Office in the Caribbean to promote gender-responsive social protection in a context where reforms have been driven mainly by efforts to reduce public debt and promote economic competitiveness.
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  4. 4
    374576

    Emerging evidence, lessons and practice in comprehensive sexuality education: a global review.

    UNESCO

    Paris, France, UNESCO, 2015. 47 p.

    Comprehensive sexuality education (CSE) has attracted growing interest and attention over recent years. This is demonstrated and reinforced by increased political commitment globally and the development of expert guidance, standards, curricula and other tools to strengthen the implementation of CSE in practice. Across the world, there are a wide range of different approaches to delivering sexuality education; at this stage in the evolution of the field, it is timely to take stock of the evidence, practice and lessons learned to date. This report provides an overview of the status of CSE implementation and coverage on a global level, drawing on specific information about the status of CSE in 48 countries, generated through analysis of existing resources and studies. Best practice in terms of providing CSE continues to develop. The current report examines the evidence base for CSE and, through a series of case studies from every region, explores initiatives that are setting the standard and pioneering new practices in the delivery of CSE. It represents the first in a series of periodic reports that aims to monitor the global implementation of CSE. Comprehensive life skills-based sexuality education helps young people to gain the knowledge and skills to make conscious, healthy and respectful choices about relationships and sexuality.
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  5. 5
    375726

    Accelerating change by the numbers. 2016 annual report of the UNFPA-UNICEF Joint Programme on Female Genital Mutilation / Cutting: Accelerating change.

    UNFPA-UNICEF Joint Programme on Female Genital Mutilation / Cutting

    New York, New York, United Nations Population Fund [UNFPA], 2017 Jul. 92 p.

    The 2016 Annual Report for the UNFPA-UNICEF Joint Programme on Female Genital Mutilation / Cutting provides two perspectives. This main document, "By the Numbers," analyses progress in quantitative terms, using the Results Framework as a basis. It provides an account of how the budget was allocated and offers profiles of each of the 17 programme countries (excepting Yemen). The profiles present facts on the national context, summarize key achievements, and share operational and financial information.
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  6. 6
    375725

    17 ways to end FGM / C. Lessons from the field.

    Jensen J; Diop NJ; Jubero M; Legesse B

    New York, New York, United Nations Population Fund [UNFPA], 2017. 80 p.

    The 2016 Annual Report for the UNFPA-UNICEF Joint Programme on Female Genital Mutilation / Cutting provides two perspectives: The main document analyses progress in quantitative terms, provides an account of how our budget was allocated and offers profiles of each of the 17 programme countries. This companion booklet uses a qualitative and narrative approach to examine more specifically the challenges, complexities and achievements on the ground. It explores the innovative approaches the Joint Programme teams, partners and activists employ to deconstruct the social norms that allow FGM / C to continue in many communities.
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  7. 7
    374440

    Taking ownership and driving progress: leading the global movement towards FP2020.

    International Planned Parenthood Federation [IPPF]

    London, United Kingdom, IPPF, 2014 Nov. 8 p.

    This publication outlines how, following the London Summit on Family Planning in 2012, International Planned Parenthood Federation (IPPF) has worked to engage governments, with the aim of building a conducive environment to reach the most vulnerable groups, no matter how remote their location, in order to reach the key goal of ensuring 120 million more women have access to family planning by 2020.
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  8. 8
    374430

    Zambia: holding government to account for FP2020 commitments.

    International Planned Parenthood Federation [IPPF]. Africa Region

    London, United Kingdom, IPPF, 2015 Sep. 2 p.

    To hold the government to account for its FP2020 commitments, the Planned Parenthood Association of Zambia (PPAZ) developed a monitoring and accountability tool, called the FP annual score card, in collaboration with local partners. The score card measures the government’s annual performance against their commitments, using indicators such as ‘demand generated for FP’, ‘financing’ and ‘access to services’. The score card helps advocates to identify what the government has delivered to date and what it should be delivering, based on a trajectory towards 2020. Family planning organizations and champions, national and international, use the results in their advocacy messaging and monitoring.
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  9. 9
    374429

    Making universal access to sexual and reproductive health a reality – building momentum for comprehensive family planning.

    International Planned Parenthood Federation [IPPF]

    London, United Kingdom, IPPF, 2015 Apr. 4 p.

    In 2015, 225 million women will not have access to contraception globally, resulting in 74 million unplanned pregnancies, ill health and over 500,000 maternal deaths. Maternal health is currently far off track and universal access to sexual and reproductive health remains a distant reality for many of the world’s poor, marginalized and vulnerable women, men and young people. To enable 120 million more women and girls to use contraception by 2020, IPPF is doing its part by: increasing family planning services to save the lives of 54,000 women, averting 46.4 million unintended pregnancies and preventing unsafe abortion; tripling the number of comprehensive and integrated sexual and reproductive health services annually, including 553 million services to adolescents. For over 60 years, IPPF has been at the vanguard in delivering comprehensive voluntary family planning services and is the leading global service provider for sexual and reproductive health. This technical briefing showcases IPPF’s work globally. We are a grassroots organization, directed by and responding to the needs of the communities that we serve.
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  10. 10
    374428

    Sustainable Development Goals: a SRHR CSO guide for national implementation.

    Barclay H; Dattler R; Lau K; Abdelrhim S; Marshall A; Feeney L

    London, United Kingdom, International Planned Parenthood Federation [IPPF], 2015 Nov. 20 p.

    The purpose of this paper is to set out what the new 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development means for civil society organizations (CSOs) working on sexual and reproductive health and rights (SRHR) and how it can be used to push for progress at the national level. It details those targets that are relevant to our work, looks at how they relate to existing programmes and commitments and suggests ways to ensure that they are implemented. It describes specific actions that national advocates may want to consider taking to drive progress on the development and implementation of national plans, to play a role in monitoring and accountability of global commitments, and to support the measurement of progress. There is no “one size fits all” approach to implementing the Agenda at a national level because every country has a different system and way of working, and will have different focus areas with respect to sustainable development. Advocates are encouraged to use the information and recommendations in this paper in a way that is helpful to their national context, and to adapt them to reflect their circumstances.
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  11. 11
    374427

    Delivering universal family planning: providing for 60 million new users by 2020.

    International Planned Parenthood Federation [IPPF]

    London, United Kingdom, IPPF, 2015 Oct. 50 p.

    As the largest civil society provider of family planning, IPPF plays a leadership role – holding governments to account for the pledges they made at the London Summit on Family Planning 2012, pushing for family planning and SRHR within the new Sustainable Development Goals national plans whilst strengthening our own delivery. Our new pledge is to reach an additional 45 million between 2015 and 2020 – meaning a total FP2020 contribution from IPPF of 60 million new users to family planning. This report showcases IPPF’s innovation and impact as the global leader in family planning services and advocacy.
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  12. 12
    374425

    Sustainable Development Goals and Family Planning 2020.

    Dockalova B; Lau K; Barclay H; Marshall A

    London, United Kingdom, International Planned Parenthood Federation [IPPF], 2016 Jun. 12 p.

    Governments have agreed a range of commitments to advance sustainable development, including promoting women’s and girls’ health and protecting human rights for all. Global commitments are important as they set a framework for funding to flow towards a particular issue and influence national development strategies and programming. As advocates, we can use global commitments to encourage coordination across national development plans, to push for funding and to increase political buy-in. This factsheet will focus on the linkages between the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) and Family Planning 2020 (FP2020) commitments.
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  13. 13
    374424

    Climate change: time to "think family planning." An advocacy toolkit for family planning advocates.

    International Planned Parenthood Federation [IPPF]; Population & Sustainability Network

    [London, United Kingdom, IPPF], 2016. 21 p.

    Family planning is a critical, human rights-based, and cost-effective approach to climate change adaptation and resilience building. The aims of the paper are for national family planning advocates to be better placed to ensure: (a) national development (including climate change) planning processes include greater emphasis on family planning; and (b) more “climate change programmes” include family planning actions, therefore increasing overall investment and action in reproductive health. After defining “climate change” and introducing the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change, 10 arguments are summarised which national family planning advocates are encouraged to employ, to suit their national contexts, to further these aims.
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  14. 14
    374423

    Climate change: time to "think family planning." A communications toolkit for family planning advocates.

    International Planned Parenthood Federation [IPPF]; Population & Sustainability Network

    [London, United Kingdom, IPPF], 2016. 9 p.

    This paper asserts that family planning is a critical, human rights-based, and cost-effective approach to climate change adaptation and resilience building. The aims of the paper are for national family planning advocates to be better placed to ensure: (a) national development plans (including climate change planning processes) include greater emphasis on voluntary family planning; and (b) more “climate change programmes” and strategies include family planning actions, therefore increasing overall investment and action in reproductive health. The accompanying policy paper summarises strategies which family planning advocates are encouraged to employ, to suit their national contexts, to further these aims. This Communications Toolkit summarises how those arguments can be edited into key messages and how those key messages can be used to reach advocacy targets in the run up to COP22, the next Climate Change Conference, to be held in Marrakech, Morocco, from 7 to 18 November 2016.
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  15. 15
    388111
    Peer Reviewed

    Advocacy, communication, and partnerships: Mobilizing for effective, widespread cervical cancer prevention.

    Wittet S; Aylward J; Cowal S; Drope J; Franca E; Goltz S; Kuo T; Larson H; Luciani S; Mugisha E; Schocken C; Torode J

    International Journal of Gynaecology and Obstetrics. 2017 Jul; 138 Suppl 1:57-62.

    Both human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination and screening/treatment are relatively simple and inexpensive to implement at all resource levels, and cervical cancer screening has been acknowledged as a "best buy" by the WHO. However, coverage with these interventions is low where they are needed most. Failure to launch or expand cervical cancer prevention programs is by and large due to the absence of dedicated funding, along with a lack of recognition of the urgent need to update policies that can hinder access to services. Clear and sustained communication, robust advocacy, and strategic partnerships are needed to inspire national governments and international bodies to action, including identifying and allocating sustainable program resources. There is significant momentum for expanding coverage of HPV vaccination and screening/preventive treatment in low-resource settings as evidenced by new global partnerships espousing this goal, and the participation of groups that previously had not focused on this critical health issue. (c) 2017 The Authors. International Journal of Gynecology & Obstetrics published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics.
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  16. 16
    320196

    Responding to intimate partner violence and sexual violence against women. WHO clinical and policy guidelines.

    World Health Organization [WHO]

    Geneva, Switzerland, World Health Organization [WHO], 2013. 68 p.

    A health-care provider is likely to be the first professional contact for survivors of intimate partner violence or sexual assault. Evidence suggests that women who have been subjected to violence seek health care more often than non-abused women, even if they do not disclose the associated violence. They also identify health-care providers as the professionals they would most trust with disclosure of abuse. These guidelines are an unprecedented effort to equip healthcare providers with evidence-based guidance as to how to respond to intimate partner violence and sexual violence against women. They also provide advice for policy makers, encouraging better coordination and funding of services, and greater attention to responding to sexual violence and partner violence within training programmes for health care providers. The guidelines are based on systematic reviews of the evidence, and cover: 1) identification and clinical care for intimate partner violence; 2) clinical care for sexual assault; 3) training relating to intimate partner violence and sexual assault against women; 4) policy and programmatic approaches to delivering services; and 5) mandatory reporting of intimate partner violence. The guidelines aim to raise awareness of violence against women among health-care providers and policy-makers, so that they better understand the need for an appropriate health-sector response. They provide standards that can form the basis for national guidelines, and for integrating these issues into health-care provider education.
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  17. 17
    375600

    UNICEF annual report 2016.

    UNICEF

    New York, New York, UNICEF, 2017 Jun. 84 p.

    This report details the results achieved by UNICEF for and with children worldwide in 2016. It covers the organization’s programme work, humanitarian action, partnerships and advocacy efforts in all strategic sectors, with an emphasis on reaching every child and accelerating progress for the most vulnerable and disadvantaged girls and boys. The report also highlights UNICEF’s innovations, its efforts to improve efficiency and effectiveness, and the stories of individual children and families directly affected by UNICEF’s work in the course of its 70th anniversary year.
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  18. 18
    374322

    Female genital mutilation/cutting and violence against women and girls strengthening the policy linkages between different forms of violence.

    United Nations. UN Women; United Nations Population Fund [UNFPA]; UNICEF

    2017 Feb; New York, New York, UN Women, 2017 Feb. 20 p.

    Violence against women and girls (VAWG) manifests in different forms. These include intimate partner violence, non-partner sexual violence, sexual exploitation and trafficking, and harmful practices such as female genital mutilation/cutting (FGM/C) and child, early and forced marriage, among others. Programmes to end harmful practices and programmes to end intimate partner violence and non-partner sexual violence are often planned and implemented separately, despite all being rooted in gender inequality and gender-based discrimination against women and girls. While this is intended so that programmes can be tailored accordingly, it can result in isolation of initiatives that would otherwise benefit from sharing of knowledge and good practices and from strategic, coordinated efforts. This policy note explores policy and programming interlinkages and considers entry points in the areas of (i) national legislation, (ii) prevention strategies, (iii) response for survivors, and (iv) data and evidence, for increased coordination and collaboration to advance the objectives of ending FGM/C and other forms of VAWG, in particular intimate partner violence and non-partner sexual violence. The note builds on the background paper “Finding convergence in policy frameworks: A background paper on the policy links between gender, violence against women and girls, and female genital mutilation/cutting” (available below). This policy note is intended for multiple audiences, including those directly involved in policy development, planning and implementing initiatives, those providing technical support, and advocates for ending all forms of VAWG, including FGM/C. This work is the result of a collaboration of UN Women with the UNFPA–UNICEF Joint Programme on FGM/C.
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  19. 19
    374315

    Youth leap into gender equality: UN Women’s youth and gender equality strategy: empowered young women and young men as partners in achieving gender equality.

    United Nations. UN Women

    New York, New York, UN Women, 2017 Apr. 28 p.

    UN Women’s Youth and Gender Equality Strategy is a pivotal response for increased youth engagement to strengthen gender equality and womens empowerment. Young people across the world have asserted their presence and raised their voices to demand a greater role in shaping their societies’ future that have challenged the status quo. The global youth population—an unprecedented 1.8 billion—only adds to the urgency of the youth agenda. The youth upsurge represents a tremendous strategic opportunity to tap into the talents and skills of young people to advance global and national development goals. UN Women’s Youth and Gender Equality Strategy is grounded in the Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination Against Women (CEDAW), the Beijing Platform for Action, the United Nations Millennium Declaration, the World Programme of Action for Youth, a host of resolutions and outcomes of the United Nations General Assembly on youth, gender equality and the empowerment of women, and the recently agreed, “Transforming our world: the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development” document. Moreover, the global review and commemoration of Beijing+20 and the adoption of a dedicated, comprehensive, and transformative Sustainable Development Goal (SDG) 5 on achieving Gender Equality and Women’s Empowerment for all women and girls coincides with the 20th anniversary of the World Programme of Action for Youth. This is a critical moment for action. UN Women aims to reinvigorate its work on youth issues against this larger global and institutional backdrop, especially the adoption of SDG 5. UN Women recognizes that both young men and women today possess extraordinary potential to positively transform their communities. UN Women has put in place a multi-faceted strategy that takes into consideration not only traditional forms of advocacy and engagement, but also new technologies and approaches in engaging young men and young women. Key elements of UN Women’s strategy include reinvigorated partnerships with a wider spectrum of entities, resource mobilization, and active monitoring and evaluation.
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  20. 20
    375327

    The Cervical Cancer Prevention Initiative: Investing in Cervical Cancer Prevention 2015–2020. Year One update, November 2016.

    Wittet S

    [Seattle, Washington], PATH, 2016 Nov. 7 p.

    It has been a year since the groundbreaking meeting in London where the Cervical Cancer Prevention Initiative was launched. This short report documents progress building the Initiative over the past 12 months, and lists key global milestones in cervical cancer during that time.
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  21. 21
    370921

    Improving health, social welfare, and human development through women's empowerment in developing countries: The 2016 Girl Up Leadership Summit, Washington, DC, USA.

    Mendoza J

    International Journal of MCH and AIDS. 2016; 5(2):87-91.

    The United Nations Foundation’s Girl Up campaign, an initiative dedicated to promoting the health, education, and leadership of adolescent girls in developing communities around the world, hosted its annual Girl Up Leadership Summit in Washington, DC from July 11-13 and welcomed more than 275 girl empowerment and women empowerment proponents to take part in leadership training, listen to and learn from influential figures like United Nations Deputy High Commissioner for Human Rights Kate Gilmore and Treasurer of the United States Rosie Rios, and engage in an official lobby day in the nation’s capital. Topics ranged from the issue of child marriage and sexual and reproductive health rights to intersectional feminism and the importance of the next generation of global girl advocates. The purpose and, later on, achievement of the conference was the development of such leaders and Girl Up representatives. Summit attendee and Girl Up Campus Leader Janel Mendoza shares her experience as a longstanding Girl Up supporter and reflects on the preeminent conversations held during and following the summit.
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  22. 22
    372762

    Evaluation of the UNFPA support to family planning 2008-2013. Volume II - Annexes.

    United Nations Population Fund [UNFPA]

    New York, Evaluation Office, United Nations Population Fund [UNFPA], 2016 Apr. 214 p.

    The purpose of the evaluation was to assess the performance of UNFPA in the field of family planning during the period covered by the Strategic Plan 2008-2013 and to provide learning to inform the implementation of the current UNFPA Family Planning Strategy Choices not chance (2012-2020). The evaluation provided an overall independent assessment of UNFPA interventions in the area of family planning and identified key lessons learned for the current and future strategies. The particular emphasis of this evaluation was on learning with a view to informing the implementation of the UNFPA family planning strategy Choices not chance 2012-2020, as well as other related interventions and programmes, such as the Global Programme to Enhance Reproductive Health Commodity Security (GPRHCS- 2013-2020). The evaluation constituted an important contribution to the mid-term review of UNFPA strategic plan 2014-2017. The evaluation features five country case study reports: Bolivia, Burkina Faso, Cambodia, Ethiopia, and Zimbabwe.
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  23. 23
    340314

    WHO Global Forum for Government Chief Nursing and Midwifery Officers, 18-19 May 2016, Geneva, Switzerland. The future of nursing and midwifery workforce in the context of the Sustainable Development Goals and universal health coverage. Forum statement.

    WHO Global Forum for Government Chief Nursing and Midwifery Officers (2016: Geneva)

    Geneva, Switzerland, World Health Organization [WHO], 2016. [2] p.

    The goal of the World Health Organization and its Member States is to achieve the highest attainable levels of health for all people. A number of health development approaches have been directed toward this goal from primary health care in the 70’s through to the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs), and the current Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). The commitment made by Member States to universal health coverage reinforces the need for strengthened nursing and midwifery contribution to achieve good health outcomes. Although many countries still have nursing and midwifery workforce shortages, we the Government Chief Nursing and Midwifery Officers recognize that in addition to increasing our numbers, more must be done in order to realize these professions full potential. Consequently, we acknowledge the importance of ensuring the quality, acceptability, relevance and sustainability of our future nursing and midwifery workforce. Strengthening nursing and midwifery services in our respective countries is possible by using the latest evidence-based knowledge and relevant technologies to create policies and management systems that support practice and leadership which deliver quality services to individuals and communities within the distinctiveness of our health systems. In the context of this Forum and in support of the Global Strategy on Human Resources for Health: Workforce 2030 and the Global Strategic Directions for Strengthening Nursing and Midwifery 2016-2020, we commit ourselves to: a) Strengthening governance and accountability, b) Maximizing capacity and capability and realising the potential of the nursing and midwifery workforce and c) Mobilizing political will, commitment and investments for nursing and midwifery.
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  24. 24
    340691

    Financing demystified.

    International Planned Parenthood Federation [IPPF]

    London, United Kingdom, IPPF, 2015 Oct. [34] p.

    With support from the Reproductive Health Supplies Coalition (RHSC) Innovation Fund, the International Planned Parenthood Federation (IPPF) is implementing the National Action for Financing (NAF) project to work with stakeholders to position funding for RH supplies as a critical element in the new development financing architecture. This publication aims to enable stakeholders to understand the implications of the changes and challenges to RH supplies funding. The advocacy messages and tactics described in this document can help influence decision-making, increase funding and improve access to RH supplies and Sexual and Reproductive Health and Rights (SRHR). (Excerpt)
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  25. 25
    385483

    Family planning in Latin America: The achievements of 50 years: Executive summary.

    Bertrand JT; Ward VM; Santiso-Galvez R

    Chapel Hill, North Carolina, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Carolina Population Center, MEASURE Evaluation, 2015 Apr. [3] p. (FS-15-136; USAID Cooperative Agreement No. AID-OAA-L-14-00004)

    This executive summary introduces the full report (See POPLINE record 337627) examining the 50-year period starting in the mid-1960s that witnessed a dramatic decline in fertility and steady increase in contraceptive use in the Latin America and Caribbean (LAC) region.
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