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Your search found 13 Results

  1. 1
    337482

    Women and girls safe spaces. A guidance note based on lessons learned from the Syrian crisis

    United Nations Population Fund [UNFPA]

    [New York, New York], UNFPA, 2015. [32] p.

    The creation of women and girls safe spaces has emerged as a key strategy for the protection and empowerment of women and girls affected by the Syrian crisis. This document provides an overview of what safe spaces are, and what key principles should be followed when establishing such spaces in humanitarian and post-crisis contexts. This guidance is based on the experiences of UNFPA and its partners in Jordan, Lebanon, Iraq, Syria and Turkey. It also refers to experiences documented by the Gender-Based Violence coordination mechanisms in Jordan and Lebanon. Lessons learned from other regions are also referenced. Guidance has also been taken from the child protection and adolescent girls sectors in establishing child-friendly spaces and girls’ safe spaces.
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  2. 2
    321700

    Supporting gender justice in Afghanistan: opportunities and challenges.

    Mantovani A

    [Unpublished] 2004. Presented at the Conference on Gender Justice in Post-Conflict Situations, "Peace Needs Women and Women Need Justice”. Co-organized by the United Nations Development Fund for Women [UNIFEM] and the International Legal Assistance Consortium. New York, New York, September 15-17, 2004. 8 p.

    For 25 years war raged in Afghanistan, destroying both the institutional fiber of the country and its justice system. Even in the period before the wars, the justice system had only managed to impose itself sporadically. Disputes that arose had to be resolved, for the most part, through informal religious or tribal systems. However acceptable some of the main laws may have been technically, they were offset by various factors: the poor training of judges, lawyers and other legal workers; decaying infrastructures; and ignorance of the law and basic rights by common citizens and even the judges themselves. The prison system had suffered even greater damages. Its infrastructure and organization were in ruins. Today enormous efforts have been mobilized to build a fair and functioning system that is respectful of human rights and international standards. It will take years for the Afghan government and people to do the job-with the help of the international community. (excerpt)
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  3. 3
    320692

    Towards achieving the MDGs in Sudan: Centrality of women's leadership and gender equality.

    Danbolt IL; Gumbonzvanda N; Karame K

    [Oslo], Norway, Norwegian Ministry of Foreign Affairs, 2005. 57 p.

    Sudanese women like everyone else aspire towards achieving the commitments made at the Millennium Summit in 2000. What are the odds, for a country and a people in a complex conflict and post-conflict situation? The ethos of the Millennium Declaration and its emphasis on women's rights, participation of all citizens, gender equality and peace, profoundly captures the reality for women and their families in Sudan. Progress towards the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) in Sudan demands creative and extra-ordinary measures centered on women's leadership, reducing gender inequalities in all governance, service provision, and resource management while fostering strategic partnerships. Sudan is a country of multiple realities for its communities. Sudanese women and people are continuing to smile with one eye, while crying with another eye. They are living between the joys and commitment to sustain the peace ushered by the CPA and crying in search of peace in the Darfurs! The publication derives from the commitment, consistency and resilience of Sudanese women in their quest for peace, safe and secure living environment; freedom from poverty, discrimination and marginalisation. It is informed by the strategic and creative partnership created between the Government of Norway, UNIFEM and NUPI in creating space for women's voices in the international processes in support of the post-conflict reconstruction of Sudan. The Oslo Gender Symposium and Donors' Conference are cases in point. It is a simple and clear message that links peace, security and development and women's human rights, from the perspective of women's leadership in the struggle for inclusion and empowerment. (excerpt)
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  4. 4
    296615

    Proudly she stands: 'Woman Free.' - statue by Edwina Sandys.

    Endrst EB

    UN Chronicle. 1990 Jun; 27(2):[1] p..

    Dedicated to the advancement of women, a 15-foot tall marble statue Woman Free" stands high above a reflecting pool and a lovely rose garden at the UN Centre in Vienna. The work, created by British sculptor Edwina Sandys, started as a simple doodle on a paper napkin in the Russian Tea Room in New York City. "My inspiration usually comes from a deep well inside me", she says. The slim, attractive artist is the granddaughter of the late Prime Minister of Great Britain Winston Churchill. She is the eldest child of Diana Churchill and Lord Duncan Sandys, a former British cabinet minister. Among her internationally recognized works is one entitled "Child", created in commemoration of the International Year of the Child in 1979, and now on permanent display in front of the UN International School in Manhattan. Others include "Generations" and "Family", respectively ensconced at the UN Vienna Centre and at UN headquarters in Geneva. Ms. Sandys almost single handedly raised the money for the "Woman Free" statue by creating a gold pendant, an exact replica of the sculpture, and selling it to interested donors. (excerpt)
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  5. 5
    288532

    Protecting choice means making choices. Legislators worldwide must choose to preserve the Cairo consensus.

    Genner R

    Countdown 2015: Sexual and Reproductive Health and Rights for All. 2004; (Spec No):48-50.

    At the ten year mark of the ICPD Programme of Action, never HAS a woman’s right to decide freely the number and spacing of her children been so widely recognised and exercised—yet paradoxically challenged. These challenges are both old and new, and they call upon us as European parliamentarians to make a number of fundamental policy, diplomatic and budgetary choices. In 1994, the adoption of the ICPD Programme of Action by 179 countries marked a major shift towards placing the individual at the centre of development and abandoning demographic targets. The Millennium Development Goals further enshrined women’s right to make their own decisions as a global development objective. Despite this explicit political will and the great strides forward of the past decade, trends have emerged that force us to reassess our long-held strategies. The first is the HIV/AIDS pandemic. In 2004, the worst-case scenarios of the early 1990s are becoming reality. The developed world watches as entire generations suffer in less developed countries from a disease that is both preventable and treatable—one that has been controlled in donor countries. Yet rather than coming together to fight a common enemy, the HIV/AIDS community and sexual and reproductive health and rights (SRHR) advocates have seemed to drift apart. (excerpt)
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  6. 6
    195832

    Home, the best medicine, Zimbabwe.

    Matende F

    Paris, France, UNESCO, 2001 Oct. [14] p. (Literacy, Gender and HIV / AIDS Series)

    This booklet is one of an ever-growing series of easy-to-read materials produced at a succession of UNESCO workshops partially funded by the Danish Development Agency (DANIDA). The workshops are based on the appreciation that gender-sensitive literacy materials are powerful tools for communicating messages on HIV/AIDS to poor rural people, particularly illiterate women and out-of-school girls. Based on the belief that HIV/AIDS is simultaneously a health and a social cultural and economic issue, the workshops train a wide range of stakeholders in HIV/AIDS prevention including literacy, health and other development workers, HIV/AIDS specialists, law enforcement officers, material developers and media professionals. Before a workshop begins, the participants select their target communities and carry out needs assessments of their potential readers. At the workshops, participants go through exercises helping them to fine tune their sensitivity to gender issues and how these affect people's risks of HIV/AIDS. The analysis of these assessments at the workshops serves as the basis for identifying the priority issues to be addressed in the booklets. They are also exposed to principles of writing for people with limited reading skills. Each writer then works on his or her booklet with support from the group. The booklets address a wide-range of issues normally not included in materials for HIV/AIDS such as the secondary status of girls and women in the family, the "sugar daddy" phenomenon, wife inheritance, the hyena practice, traditional medicinal practices superstitions, home-based care and living positively with AIDS. They have one thing in common- they influence greatly a person's safety from contracting HIV/AIDS. We hope that these booklets will inspire readers to reflect on some of life's common situations, problems and issues that ordinary women and men face in their day-to-day relationships. In so doing, they might reach a conclusion that the responsibility is theirs to save their own lives and those of their loved ones from HIV/AIDS. (excerpt)
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  7. 7
    195834

    Me, you and AIDS. Kenya. A product of a UNESCO-DANIDA workshop for preparation of post-literacy materials and radio programmes for women and girls in Africa.

    Nyingi P

    Paris, France, UNESCO, 2000 Jan. [24] p.

    Though the booklets are intended for use with neo-literate women and out-of-school girls, the messages in the stories and the radio programme scripts that accompany them are also relevant for use as supplementary reading materials in formal schools for readers of both sexes. The subjects of the booklets, based on the needs assessments, reflect a wide range of needs and conditions of African women - from Senegal to Kenya, from Mali to South Africa, from Niger to Malawi. A list of common concerns has emerged. These include: HIV-AIDS, domestic violence, the exploitation of girls employed as domestic servants, the lack of positive role models for women and girls, the economic potential of women through small business development, the negative consequences of child marriage, and the need for a more equal division of labour between men and women in the home. Each booklet describes one way of treating a subject of high priority to African women. In the process, the authors have attempted to render the material gender-sensitive. They have tried to present African women and girls and their families in the African context and view the issues and problems from their perspective. We hope these booklets will inspire readers, as they did their authors, to reflect on some of life's common situations, problems and issues that ordinary women and men face every day. The questions accompanying each booklet will help readers ask questions and find answers to some of the issues which also touch their own lives. How the characters in these booklets cope with specific situations, their trials and tribulations, can serve as lessons for women and men living together in 21st Century Africa. (excerpt)
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  8. 8
    186807

    International assistance to women's organizations. [Ayuda internacional a las organizaciones femeninas]

    Kumar K

    In: Women and civil war. Impact, organizations, and action, edited by Krishna Kumar. Boulder, Colorado, Lynne Rienner Publishers, 2001. 205-214.

    Several factors have led the international donor community to support women's organizations both during and after conflict. One obvious factor is that because of lack of resources, shortage of skilled personnel, and general decline in the morale of the staff, public bureaucracies become extremely fragile in war-torn societies. They are often unable to provide urgently needed social services to the suffering populace. Therefore, the international community tends to develop partnerships with voluntary organizations, including women's organizations, to provide essential assistance to the needy people. There are two additional reasons for the international donor community to support women's organizations. First, by virtue of their leadership and commitment, these organizations are better able to reach women than are male-dominated or mixed civil-society organizations. Their staff members can easily empathize with the intended women beneficiaries, who in turn feel more at ease in sharing their problems with them. Second, the international community also sees in women's organizations potential for empowering women. In addition to channeling assistance, they contribute to the social and psychological empowerment of women by teaching self-reliance and leadership skills. (excerpt)
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  9. 9
    187531
    Peer Reviewed

    Gender and HIV / AIDS.

    Turmen T

    International Journal of Gynecology and Obstetrics. 2003 Sep; 82(3):411-418.

    The impact of gender on HIV/AIDS is an important dimension in understanding the evolution of the epidemic. How have gender inequality and discrimination against women affected the course of the HIV epidemic? This paper outlines the biological, social and cultural determinants that put women and adolescent girls at greater risk of HIV infection than men. Violence against women or the threat of violence often increases women’s vulnerability to HIV/AIDS. An analysis of the impact of gender on HIV/AIDS demonstrates the importance of integrating gender into HIV programming and finding ways to strengthen women by implementing policies and programs that increase their access to education and information. Women’s empowerment is vital to reversing the epidemic. (author's)
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  10. 10
    184917

    Young people and HIV / AIDS. A UNICEF fact sheet.

    UNICEF

    New York, New York, UNICEF, 2002. [2] p. (UNICEF Fact Sheet)

    The world’s young people are threatened by HIV/AIDS. Of the 40 million people living with HIV/AIDS, more than a quarter are aged 15 to 24. Half of all new infections now occur in young people. Young people are a vital factor in halting the spread of HIV/AIDS, and many of them are playing a significant role in the fight against it. But they, and children on the brink of adolescence, urgently need the skills, knowledge and services to protect themselves against becoming infected with HIV. (excerpt)
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  11. 11
    180437
    Peer Reviewed

    Cyprus: hands across the divide. A case study in bi-communal, cross-border activism.

    Loizou G

    Women and Environments International. 2003 Spring; (58-59):43-47.

    Hands Across the Divide (HAD) is a newly formed NGO linking women of northern Turkish-speaking Cyprus and southern Greek-speaking Cyprus. It is unique, the first of its kind in Cyprus, and the first bi-communal Cypriot organization to gain international recognition. So total is the Cypriot partition, that it is legally impossible to register a bi-communal organization in Cyprus as a single organization. So the women of HAD went to London to register. Despite all the barriers to communication across the Green Line, the women of HAD are carrying out joint actions for peace. While the northern HAD women are sharing in the massive demonstrations in the north, the Greek Cypriot members of Hands Across the Divide have started their own action in the south. Cyprus now faces entry to the European Union bringing new urgency to the question of reunification and peace. (excerpt)
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  12. 12
    170210

    Making the transition work for women in Europe and Central Asia.

    Lazreg M

    Washington, D.C., World Bank, 1999 Dec. viii, 113 p. (World Bank Discussion Paper No. 411; Europe and Central Asia Gender and Development Series)

    This collection of papers was selected from the proceedings of the World Bank conference held on June 7-8, 1999 in Washington District of Colombia. The conference entitled, "Making the Transition Work for Women in Europe and Central Asia," underlined the importance of gender as a factor influencing change during the shift from a command to a market economy. Women, who were invited to the conference, from Europe spoke directly to the World Bank about their problems and to make suggestions for action. In addition, scholars from the US and Britain were also invited to express their views on the gender dimension of transition. It was pointed out that the transition is taking place without the input of women, who are consequently suffering from the change. The participants also agreed the changes also caused men to engage in domestic violence, thus causing additional problems for women. The feminization of poverty and trafficking in women were also identified as new problems that demand to be addressed. In view of these problems, the participants advised that reforms were necessary but should proceed with caution.
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  13. 13
    150307

    The four global women's conferences 1975-1995: historical perspective. [Los cuatro congresos mundiales de la mujer 1975-1995: perspectiva histórica]

    United Nations. Department of Public Information

    New York, New York, United Nations, Dept. of Public Information, 2000 May. 5 p.

    This paper presents the historical perspective of the four global women's conferences conducted between 1975 and 1995. The conferences aimed to unite the international community in elevating the cause of gender equality to the very center of the global agenda. The efforts undertaken have gone through several phases and transformations, from exclusive attention to developmental needs to the recognition of essential contributions to the entire development process. The conference held in Mexico City (1975) highlighted the development of goals, effective strategies and plan of action for the advancement of women. The Copenhagen Conference (1980) reviewed and appraised the 1975 World Plan of Action. Equal access to education, employment opportunities, and adequate health care services were pinpointed where specific, highly focused action was essential. The birth of global feminism was recognized during the Nairobi Conference (1985). Lastly, the Beijing Conference (1995) discussed the fundamental transformation achieved by the other conferences and explored other problems and their possible solutions recognizing the essence of women's empowerment and advancement of women in the 21st century. A special session to review the progress since the Beijing Conference was convened in New York, 5-9 June 2000, under the theme "Women 2000: Gender Equality, Development and Peace for the Twenty-first Century."
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