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  1. 1
    724425

    Fortieth report and accounts, 1971-1972.

    Family Planning Association [FPA]

    London, FPA, 1972. 48 p.

    Currently, public authorities pay for almost 2/3 of the family planning consultations conducted by the Family Planning Association, and this is the most significant development since the publication of the last Family Planning Association Report. Additionally, more local health authorities are operating direct clinic and domiciliary services. The Family Planning Association handed over the management of 39 clinics to public authorities in the 1971-1972 year. However, despite this progress, family planning service provision by public authorities throughout England continues to be uneven in quality and extent. Spending by local health authorities for each woman at risk varies from 1 penny per woman at risk in Burnley (excluding the city of London) to 179 pence at Islington. In addition to the problem of inconsistency in spending, there appears to be no immediate prospect of a comprehensive family planning service - one that is available to all, is free of charge, and is backed by an adequate education campaign. Although government help for the extension of domiciliary family planning service is impressive, it should not obscure the false economies in spending on other contraceptive delivery services such as general practitioners, specialist clinics, and specialized advisory centers. Until the government announces the details of its plans for family planning services within the National Health Service beginning April 1974, the Family Planning Association's own detailed planning cannot be exact. The Association's basic policy continues to be to turn over the responsibility for the management of clinic and domiciliary contraceptive services as quickly and as smoothly as possible to the public authorities. Already there is concern that some clinic services managed by public authorities may become less attractive, particularly to young people, and that differences in the quality of service will increase under local public management as well as that backup services will be neglected. Also existing is the realization that the public authorities do not do enough to attract people to the use of contraception.
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  2. 2
    082185

    Workplan: fiscal 1993, 1 April 1993 to 31 March 1994.

    Association for Voluntary Surgical Contraception [AVSC]

    New York, New York, AVSC, 1993 Mar 16. vi, 43, 108, 47, 15 p.

    The March 1993 Association for Voluntary Surgical Contraception (AVSC) workplan outlines strategic plans to expand services to USAID priority developing countries while reducing services in other countries and to add all contraceptive methods requiring a medical procedure to its services. AVSC plans on continuing to focus on voluntary sterilization. Its guiding principles still are expanding access to services, guaranteeing free and informed choice, and ensuring the safety and effectiveness of services. AVSC plans to develop comprehensive country programs and to take on special or global programs. Some anticipated special programs include medical quality assurance, voluntarism and well-informed clients, client-centered service systems, and vasectomy and male involvement. Managerial plans are country level planning and evaluation, continuous strategic planning, annual workplan development, decentralization, strengthening technical capacity, interagency collaboration and strategic alliances, and diversification of funding. AVSC's 1993 funding sources are dominated by USAID (57% from USAID central office and 27% from USAID missions). UNFPA and the World Bank together comprise 8% and private sources make up another 8%. AVSC plans to provide services in some countries for which USAID does not provide funding: Iran, Vietnam, the former Soviet Union, and the US. Specific issues that AVSC faces in fiscal year 1993 are insufficient USAID funding, resistance by other agencies to collaborate, addressing the highly competitive bidding game related to requests for proposals with the USAID Office of Population, assuring partners and supporters of its continued emphasis on voluntary sterilization, confronting the effect of adverse press coverage on vasectomy and prostate cancer, and remaining mindful of contraceptive choice issues.
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  3. 3
    011374

    [Voluntary sterilization in France and in the world] La sterilisation volontaire en France et dans le monde.

    Palmer R; Dourlen-Rollier AM; Audebert A; Geraud R

    Paris, Masson, 1981. 277 p.

    This monograph, directed not only to medical and paramedical personnel but to sterilization seekers as well, touches upon all aspects of voluntary sexual sterilization. The history of sterilization is follwed by a review of female and male anatomy and physiology, and of present available and reversible methods of contraception. All surgical, laparoscopic, tubal, electrocoagulation, culdoscopic, or hysteroscopic methods of female sterilization are described, and results, including morbidity and mortality, complication rates, side effects, and failure rates are presented. This part of the monograph is illustrated with clear and schematic drawings. Problems related to demand for reversal of sterilization are discussed. The same is done for male sterilization, its techniques and complications. The monograph discusses the ever increasing demographic problem in the world , and the role and the extent of voluntary sexual sterilization in industrialized countries and in third world countries, stressing the efforts of those international agencies, such as WHO, IPPF, the Population Council, the European Council, UNFPA, and the World Federation of Associations for Voluntary Sterilization, which promote sterilization around the world, and offer sterilization services. The authors then investigate the role of the physician in the decision to recur to sterilization as a permanent contraceptive method, and in deciding the proper surgical technique. A special chapter discusses the psychological conflicts related to sterilization, especially those which arise before the intervention, and which may very well represent the strongest contraindication to sterilization. A final chapter is devoted to France and to the sociocultural aspects which make sterilization more or less acceptable, the existing legislation, and the professional problems linked to sterilization interventions.
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