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  1. 1
    334433

    Comprehensive sexuality education: The challenges and opportunities of scaling-up.

    DeJong J

    Paris, France, UNESCO, 2014. [92] p.

    This report builds on a program of work on sexuality education for young people initiated in 2008 by UNESCO. It is also informed by several other past and ongoing initiatives related to scaling up sexuality education, as well as drawing on case studies presented at the Bogota international consultation on sexuality education, convened by UNFPA in 2010. The report emphasizes the challenges for scaling-up in terms of integrating comprehensive sexuality education into the formal curricula of schools. It aims to provide conceptual and practical guidance on definitions and strategies of scaling-up; illustrate good practice and pathways for successful scale-up in light of diverse contextual parameters; and provide some principles of scaling up sexuality education that are of relevance internationally.
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  2. 2
    195832

    Home, the best medicine, Zimbabwe.

    Matende F

    Paris, France, UNESCO, 2001 Oct. [14] p. (Literacy, Gender and HIV / AIDS Series)

    This booklet is one of an ever-growing series of easy-to-read materials produced at a succession of UNESCO workshops partially funded by the Danish Development Agency (DANIDA). The workshops are based on the appreciation that gender-sensitive literacy materials are powerful tools for communicating messages on HIV/AIDS to poor rural people, particularly illiterate women and out-of-school girls. Based on the belief that HIV/AIDS is simultaneously a health and a social cultural and economic issue, the workshops train a wide range of stakeholders in HIV/AIDS prevention including literacy, health and other development workers, HIV/AIDS specialists, law enforcement officers, material developers and media professionals. Before a workshop begins, the participants select their target communities and carry out needs assessments of their potential readers. At the workshops, participants go through exercises helping them to fine tune their sensitivity to gender issues and how these affect people's risks of HIV/AIDS. The analysis of these assessments at the workshops serves as the basis for identifying the priority issues to be addressed in the booklets. They are also exposed to principles of writing for people with limited reading skills. Each writer then works on his or her booklet with support from the group. The booklets address a wide-range of issues normally not included in materials for HIV/AIDS such as the secondary status of girls and women in the family, the "sugar daddy" phenomenon, wife inheritance, the hyena practice, traditional medicinal practices superstitions, home-based care and living positively with AIDS. They have one thing in common- they influence greatly a person's safety from contracting HIV/AIDS. We hope that these booklets will inspire readers to reflect on some of life's common situations, problems and issues that ordinary women and men face in their day-to-day relationships. In so doing, they might reach a conclusion that the responsibility is theirs to save their own lives and those of their loved ones from HIV/AIDS. (excerpt)
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  3. 3
    195834

    Me, you and AIDS. Kenya. A product of a UNESCO-DANIDA workshop for preparation of post-literacy materials and radio programmes for women and girls in Africa.

    Nyingi P

    Paris, France, UNESCO, 2000 Jan. [24] p.

    Though the booklets are intended for use with neo-literate women and out-of-school girls, the messages in the stories and the radio programme scripts that accompany them are also relevant for use as supplementary reading materials in formal schools for readers of both sexes. The subjects of the booklets, based on the needs assessments, reflect a wide range of needs and conditions of African women - from Senegal to Kenya, from Mali to South Africa, from Niger to Malawi. A list of common concerns has emerged. These include: HIV-AIDS, domestic violence, the exploitation of girls employed as domestic servants, the lack of positive role models for women and girls, the economic potential of women through small business development, the negative consequences of child marriage, and the need for a more equal division of labour between men and women in the home. Each booklet describes one way of treating a subject of high priority to African women. In the process, the authors have attempted to render the material gender-sensitive. They have tried to present African women and girls and their families in the African context and view the issues and problems from their perspective. We hope these booklets will inspire readers, as they did their authors, to reflect on some of life's common situations, problems and issues that ordinary women and men face every day. The questions accompanying each booklet will help readers ask questions and find answers to some of the issues which also touch their own lives. How the characters in these booklets cope with specific situations, their trials and tribulations, can serve as lessons for women and men living together in 21st Century Africa. (excerpt)
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  4. 4
    128793

    Istanbul Declaration.

    International Congress on Population Education and Development (1993: Istanbul)

    In: First International Congress on Population Education and Development, Istanbul, Turkey, 14-17 April, 1993. Action Framework for Population Education on the Eve of the Twenty-First Century. Istanbul declaration, [compiled by] United Nations Population Fund [UNFPA] [and] UNESCO. [New York, New York], UNFPA, 1993. 5-7.

    Participants at the International Congress on Population Education and Development, organized by the United Nations Educational, Scientific, and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) and the UN Populations Fund in Istanbul during April 14-17, 1993, adopted the Istanbul Declaration and approved an action framework for population education. Population is one of the world's most serious concerns, which education can help to solve. The world's population needs to be taught about important population issues. In particular, population education projects and programs need to reach to all levels of the educational system, to all types of educational institutions, and to all settings of non-formal education. Population education should be developed as an integrated component of educational curricula. Population education, environmental education, and international education all improve the quality of life and the relationships of humans with each other and nature. Congress participants call upon international and organizational support for new and ongoing population education.
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  5. 5
    157614

    [L'Oreal aids women in science in the countries of the South] L'Oreal aide la science au feminin dans les pays du Sud.

    de Sainte Lorette C

    EQUILIBRES ET POPULATIONS. 2001 Mar; (66):4.

    The L’Oreal Award for Women in Science rewards 5 scientists annually with UNESCO support. As such, L’Oreal, a cosmetics manufacturer, is making an effort to support women’s role in research in both developed and developing countries. Professor Adeyinda Gladys Falusi, a 2001 award recipient, describes the difficult conditions in which she has studied, for 25 years, the molecular genetics of often seen hereditary blood diseases in Nigeria, such as falci-form anemia. In Africa, and especially Nigeria, a lack of resources frustrates research. When resources are available, the equipment is old and poorly maintained. Energy and transport problems also exist, including frequent power outages. It is common for lights and computers to lose power in the middle of an experiment. Regarding information sources, research centers and universities lack funding to subscribe to scientific journals. Although many of her colleagues have gone to work in countries with better research conditions, Professor Falusi prefers to remain in Nigeria with hopes of having a more significant impact upon her society. She hopes her research will directly and significantly help populations. Professor Falusi visits schools to help prevent the diseases she researches, such as anemia, affecting 3 million people in Nigeria and associated with multiple complications. She also researches malaria. Falusi and her colleagues lack the resources and support they need to properly teach the population about its health and provide access to health services. They depend upon international aid, which should be more forthcoming.
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  6. 6
    128792

    First International Congress on Population Education and Development.

    In: First International Congress on Population Education and Development, Istanbul, Turkey, 14-17 April, 1993. Action Framework for Population Education on the Eve of the Twenty-First Century. Istanbul declaration, [compiled by] United Nations Population Fund [UNFPA] [and] UNESCO. [New York, New York], UNFPA, 1993. 3-4.

    Resolution 5.3, adopted by the General Conference of UNESCO at its 26th session in 1991, authorized the Director-General to organize, jointly with the UN Population Fund (UNFPA), the first International Congress on Population Education and Development (ICPED). Congress aims were to review trends in population education worldwide over the past 2 decades, to adopt a declaration upon the role of population education in human development, and to devise an action framework in the field. The congress was also held to strengthen the integration of population education into formal and non-formal education systems. At the invitation of the Turkish government, the congress was held in Istanbul during April 14-17, 1993, during which 93 countries were represented and 245 participants attended, including 20 ministers of education and 5 deputy ministers. The 27th session of the General Conference of UNESCO in Paris during October-November 1993 welcomed the conclusions of the first ICPED and endorsed its declaration. Member states, nongovernmental organizations, and governmental agencies are encouraged to implement the principles and activities suggested in the declaration and action framework.
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  7. 7
    067892

    International Conference on the Implications of AIDS for Mothers and Children: technical statements and selected presentations. Jointly organized by the Government of France and the World Health Organization, Paris, 27-30 November 1989.

    World Health Organization [WHO]. Global Programme on AIDS

    [Unpublished] 1991. [2], 64 p.

    The International Conference on the Implications of AIDS for Mothers and Children was organized by the World Health Organization (WHO) in cooperation with the French Government. Co-sponsors included the United Nations organizations UNDP, UNICEF, and UNESCO, along with the International Labor Organization (ILO), the World Bank, and the Council of Europe. Following assorted introductory addresses, statements by chairmen of the conference's technical working groups are presented in the paper. Working group discussion topics include virology; immunology; epidemiology; clinical management; HIV and pregnancy; diagnoses; implications for health, education, community, and social welfare systems; and economic and demographic impact. Chairman statements include an introduction, discussion of the state of current knowledge, research priorities, implications for policies and programs, and recommendations. The Paris Declaration on Women, Children and Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome concluded the conference.
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  8. 8
    041497

    A world of difference: the international distribution of information: the media and developing countries.

    Garbo G

    Paris, France, Unesco, [1985]. 114 p. (Communication and Society 15; COM-85/WS-7)

    Describing the international debate on information and communication, this document deals with the debate on Freedom of Information, pursued at the UN in the years following World War II, considers the theme of Unesco's work in the field, mostly in the 1970s in the context of the emerging discussion of a new world information and communication order; and traces the development of the International Program for the Development of Communication (IPDC) from its origins to the present day. The survey and analysis ofthe debate which has taken place in the UN system from 1946 to the present concerning freedom of the press and distribution of information suggests an inevitable conclusion. 30-40 years ago the governments of Western countries and the most influential representatives for the press in those same countries were much more willing to emphasize the societal responsibilities of the media on an international level than they are today. At that time, all the Western nations supported the proposal for a Convention on the International Right of Correction. Widespread agreement existed in support of establishing an international committee which would be able to issue identification cards to journalists on dangerous assignments on the condition that they pledged to conduct themselves in accordance with the principles of journalistic integrity. The Western countries supported a recommended draft for an international code of ethics for information personnel. 1 of the reassons for the change in attitudes on these issues is that influential media organizations in the US decided that as far as international press issues were concerned they would be better served if governments were not involved. The attitude of rejecting all international negotiations on global mass communication cannot be maintained in the long run. No government can avoid influencing media activities by means of laws, fiscal policies, and government regulations. And, the flow of information continues to transcend national boundaries. The need for international action is increasing, not only as far as allocating frequency bands and satellite capacity is concerned, but also to narrow the gap between South and North and to promote the contribution of the media towards solving the common problems facing humankind. In the 3rd world, it is essential to adopt a long-term perspective on media development. Measures which appear to benefit authoritarian rulers in the short run may prove to promote freedom of the press in a longer perspective. When individuals in a position of power see that people do not trust media which lie about reality in their country, they may recognize the value in freeing the media from political monitoring.
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  9. 9
    197362

    Why people move: comparative perspectives of the dynamics of internal migration

    Balan J

    Paris, France, Unesco Press, 1981. 342 p.

    This work is the outcome of an international symposium held in Cuernavaca, Mexico, September 18-21, 1978. The symposium, organized jointly by Unesco and the Latin American Social Sciences Council's Committee on Population and Development, was concerned with the relationship between migration and development. The causes and consequences of rural migration are first explored, and case studies on the relationship between internal migration and development are presented for Italy, Argentina, Turkey, Chile, and Poland. Next, some behavioral aspects of internal migration and development are examined for Mexico and the Republic of Korea. Finally, some policy aspects and alternatives to rural-urban migration are considered, with examples from Peru, Brazil, Argentina, and Tropical Africa.
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  10. 10
    025476

    Media policy for the Third World.

    Witte BC

    Universitas. 1983 Dec; 25(4):253-63.

    Unescos reports on the gap existing in mass media between the developed and the developing countries shows that in 1978 the 3rd world countries accounted for 70% of the world population, but only 22% of the published book titles, 9% of newsprint consumption, 18% of the radio receivers, and 12% of the television receivers. The contrast is more noticeable with the extremely marked urban rural gap in Central and South America, Africa, and Asia. Although illiteracy is "overleaped" by radio and television, in vast regions of the world participation in the "information-based society" does not go beyond a transistor radio of limited range. The progress in technological development might result in widening further the development gap between North and South in the field of information and communicaton. Research and development are possible almost only in the industrial countries and a few "threshold countries" such as India or Brazil. Satellites, cable networks, or networks of television transmitters confront most developing countries with unsolvable financing problems and human resources needs. While technology can make communications easier in many respects, nearly all developing countries areunable to establish the link to the information-based society with their own resources. Some theorists in North and South either negatethe need for such a link or question it. The international debate in recent years shows that the developing countries recognize both the apparent dangers and the great opportunities of the modern information and communication media: "drop out of the system" has changed to better participation, both in its products and in its control. The essence of the "media declaration" passed by the Unesco general conference in 1978 is a double commitment on the part of the member countries to the goal of a "free flow and a wider and better balanced dissemination of information" and to cooperation in the expedited building up of the inadequate structures in the developing countries. How this commitment is to be realized remains the most important issue for the future. In nearly all developing countries much needs to be done before a functioning media system which reaches all citizens and can be used by everyone is achieved. The Federal Republic of Germany, as a donor country and through government channels, political foundations, and nongovernment organizations, has given 1 billion deutsch marks for media aid to developing countries. The main emphasis is on the supply of equipment and material and on training and consultative assistance. For several years cooperation in the building of new agencies has been a priority, and it is hoped that this will continue so that the media declaration of 1978 can be kept.
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