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  1. 1
    315100

    Guidelines for adaptation of the WHO Orientation Programme on Adolescent Health for Health Care Providers in Europe and Central Asia.

    Brann C

    New York, New York, United Nations Population Fund [UNFPA], Division for Arab States, Europe and Central Asia, 2006. 25 p.

    The Orientation Programme on Adolescent Health for Health Care Providers (OP) was developed by the Department of Child and Adolescent Health and Development, WHO in 2003. The aim of the OP is to orient health care providers to the special characteristics of adolescence and to appropriate approaches in addressing some adolescent-specific health needs and problems. The OP aims to strengthen the abilities of the health care providers to respond to adolescents more effectively and with greater sensitivity. The OP can significantly contribute to building national and regional capacity on adolescent health and development. (excerpt)
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  2. 2
    192541

    WHO recommendations [letter]

    Mansour D

    Journal of Family Planning and Reproductive Health Care. 2004 Apr; 30(2):131.

    May I congratulate the Journal and the Clinical Effectiveness Unit for continuing to produce excellent Guidance for those of us working in the field of reproductive health. The wide dissemination of these articles will ensure uniformity and quality in contraception provision in primary and secondary care. I have, however, one concern. This has been alluded to in a recent article describing the consensus process for adapting the World Health Organization (WHO) Selected Practice Recommendations for UK Use. As a result of the relaxation of some of the more cautious rules a very small number of women may become pregnant. An obvious example is giving Depo- Provera injections 2 weeks late (i.e. at 14 weeks) without any precautionary measures. The Selected Practice Recommendations for Contraceptive Use were developed to improve and extend contraceptive provision in developing countries. In developed countries, however, those becoming pregnant may take a more litigious view particularly when patient information leaflets and the Summaries of Product Characteristics (SPCs) state contrary and more cautious advice. In addition, new evidence regarding follicular development potential suggests that more, rather than less, caution may be advisable. Could the Faculty of Family Planning and Reproductive Health Care or the University of Aberdeen be sued? (excerpt)
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