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  1. 1
    080189

    The world tomorrow..? Annual report 1991/92.

    World Population Foundation

    Laren, Netherlands, World Population Foundation, 1992. 20 p.

    The World Population Fund is a non-profit organization created in 1987 to increase awareness of the nature, size, and complexity of rapid population growth and to support population projects in developing countries. The foundation hopes that its efforts will improve global standards of living. Projects emphasize the collection, analysis, and dissemination of population information; the formulation and implementation of population policies; maternal and child health care and family planning (FP); and improving the position of women. Collaborating regularly with the Dutch government, the UN, and other international organizations, the World Population Fund is the only organization in the netherlands which concerns itself specifically with problems of world population growth. This report outlines the consequences of world population growth; fund activities in 1991 in information, education, and training; project fundraising; family planning efforts in Burkina Faso, India, and Tanzania; and collaboration with the Consultancy Group for maternal health and FP. Fund accounts are presented. Teenage pregnancy, population pressures and environmental degradation, urbanization, and economic development are discussed. If present population growth trends continue, world population will triple within the next century to 18 billion with 90% of the growth in developing countries. Widespread poverty, malnutrition, disease, and early mortality will be the consequences of such growth. While experience shows that FP programs can help lower population growth rates, demand for FP is greater than supply in most developing countries. In fact, 300 million couples, the majority of whom live in developing countries, are being denied the universal right to freely decide the number and spacing of their children. The persistence of social and political controversy over funding family planning in developing countries, funding shortages, and inadequate policies and programs continue to result in teenage and child pregnancies, abortions, unwanted births, malnourished mothers and children, and maternal mortality. Balanced population policies and programs integrated within development plans are called for. To that end, the World Population Fund in 1992 will emphasize interactions between population growth and environment while also focusing upon the needs of and services for youth.
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  2. 2
    016472

    [Society and procreation: the social factors that affect them] Societe et procreation: les facteurs sociaux qui l'influencent

    Gubbels R

    Brussels, Belgium, Editions de l'Universite de Bruxelles, 1981. 291 p. (In series: Etudes sur la Famille)

    This volume contains a collection of papers by members of the Study Group for Family Roles, an organization of scholars which pursues studies on family roles from both historical and analytical perspectives. The theme of the present volume is the control imposed by the collectivity on individual fertility behavior through mores, laws, sterotypes, and other means, and which is apparent in widely varying historical situations. The 10 articles concern Malthusian problems in archaic societies; voluntary birth control in the Roman empire; aspects of birth limitation in traditional Jewish society; Islam and contraception; social pressure and material incentives in Chinese demographic policy; social aspects of procreation in the Soviet Union; social aspects of precreation in Rumania and Hungary; procreation and education; attitudes of family planning personnel toward contraception in Belgium; and the role of the UN in family planning.
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