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  1. 1
    312381

    HIV / AIDS.

    International Food Policy Research Institute

    New and Noteworthy in Nutrition. 2002 Sep 13; (38):3-4.

    The last two issues of NNN have devoted considerable column space to HIV/AIDS. This is because the pandemic is one of the major nutritional problems the world is currently facing. There is now considerable evidence of how AIDS precipitates and exacerbates other determinants of malnutrition. As Peter Piot, UNAIDS Director, said at the XIV International AIDS Conference in Barcelona .The only effective treatment at present is antiretrovirals. However, inadequate media attention has been given to the importance of good nutrition. Other treatments and prophylaxis especially, have been neglected. It doesn't make a headline, it is not a sexy story. (excerpt)
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  2. 2
    012196
    Peer Reviewed

    Nutritional anemia: its understanding and control with special reference to the work of the World Health Organization.

    Baker SJ; DeMaeyer EM

    American Journal of Clinical Nutrition. 1979 Feb; 32(2):368-417.

    Since 1949, the World Health Organization, recognizing the public health importance of nutritional anemia, has sponsored efforts directed towards its understanding and control. During this period, often as a result of the work of the Organization, advances have been made in many areas. Basic understanding of iron, folate, and vitamin B12 nutrition, and the various factors which may influence the availability and requirements of these factors, has greatly increased. Surveys in a number of countries have highlighted the widespread prevalence of nutritional anemia, particularly in developing countries. The major factor responsible is a deficiency of iron, with folate deficiency also playing a role in some population groups, especially in pregnant women. There is increasing evidence that anemia adversely affects the health of individuals and may have profound socioeconomic consequences. Control of nutritonal anemia is possible by providing the deficient nutrient(s) either as therapeutic supplements or by fortification of commonly used foodstuffs. Some control programs are reviewed and suggestions for further action are outlined. The Organization still has an important role to play in this field, encouraging the development of control programs and providing advice and technical assistance to member countries. (author's)
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