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Your search found 11 Results

  1. 1
    071957

    Netherlands.

    United Nations. Department of International Economic and Social Affairs. Population Division

    In: World population policies. Volume II. Gabon to Norway, [compiled by] United Nations. Department of International Economic and Social Affairs. Population Division. New York, New York, United Nations, 1989. 202-5. (Population Studies No. 102/Add.1; ST/ESA/SER.A/102/Add.1)

    Netherlands' 1985 population of 14,500,000 is projected to grow to 14,691,000 by the year 2025. In 1985, 19.6% of the population was aged 0-14 years, while 16.5% were over the age of 60. 15.1% and 30.1% are projected to be in these respective age groups by the year 2025. The rate of natural increase will have declined from 3.8 to -2.7 over the period. Life expectancy should increase from 76.0 to 78.2 years, the crude death rate will increase from 8.7 to 13.0, while infant mortality will decline from 8.3 to 5.2. The fertility rate will rise over the period from 1.6 to 1.9, with a corresponding drop in the crude birth rate from 12.5 to 10.4. The 1985 contraceptive prevalence rate was 72.0, while the 1980 female mean age at 1st marriage was 23.2 years. Urban population will increase from 88.4% in 1985 to 89.6% overall by the year 2025. Population growth, morbidity, mortality, fertility, and spatial distribution are considered to be acceptable by the government, while high immigration and low emigration are not. The Netherlands has an explicit population policy. Fertility should be 15-30% below replacement level over several years in order to stop population growth, the level of immigration should be restricted, and a stationary population should ultimately be smaller than that presently realized. Population policy as it relates to development objectives is discussed, followed by consideration of specific policies adopted and measures taken to address above-mentioned problematic demographic indicators. The status of women and population data systems are also explored.
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  2. 2
    071947

    Malta.

    United Nations. Department of International Economic and Social Affairs. Population Division

    In: World population policies. Volume II. Gabon to Norway, [compiled by] United Nations. Department of International Economic and Social Affairs. Population Division. New York, New York, United Nations, 1989. 162-5. (Population Studies No. 102/Add.1; ST/ESA/SER.A/102/Add.1)

    Malta's 1985 population of 383,000 is projected to grow to 459,000 by the year 2025. In 1985, 23.9% of the population was ages 0-14 years, while 13.8% were over the age of 60. 19.5% and 23.7% are projected to be in these prospective age groups by the year 2025. The rate of natural increase will have declined from 7.3 to 1.8 over the period. Life expectancy should increase fROm 71.7 to 76.9 years, the crude death rate will increase from 10.1 to 11.2, while infant mortality will decline from 12.9 to 6.6. The fertility rate will rise over the period from 2.0 to 2.1, with a corresponding drop in the crude birth rate from 17.4 to 13.0. Urban population will increase from 85.3% in 1985 to 92.4% overall by the year 2025. All levels and trends are considered to be acceptable by the government. In turn, Malta does not have an explicit population policy. Despite the lack of governmental intervention to influence the birth rate, the government recognizes the need keep rates low. Population policy as it related to development objectives is discussed, followed by consideration of specific policies adopted and measures taken to address above-mentioned problematic demographic indicators. The status of women and population data systems are also explored.
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  3. 3
    071901

    Iceland.

    United Nations. Department of International Economic and Social Affairs. Population Division

    In: World population policies. Volume II. Gabon to Norway, [compiled by] United Nations. Department of International Economic and Social Affairs. Population Division. New York, New York, United Nations, 1989. 58-61. (Population Studies No. 102/Add.1; ST/ESA/SER.A/102/Add.1)

    Iceland's 1985 population of 243,000 is projected to grow to 304, 000 by the year 2025. In 1985, 26.6% of the population was aged 0.14 years, while 13.8% were over the age of 60. 18.0% and 23.7% are projected to be in these respective age groups by the year 2025. The rate of natural increase will have declined from 12.3 to 2.3 over the period. Life expectancy should increase from 76.8 to 78.3 years, the crude death rate will increase from 7.2 to 9.6, while infant mortality will decline from 6.4 to 5.0. The fertility rate will decline over the period from 2.4 to 1.9, with a corresponding drop in the crude birth rate from 19.5 to 11.9. The 1980 female mean age at 1st marriage was 23.8 years. Urban population will increase from 89.4% in 1985 to 93.3% overall by the year 2025. All levels and trends are considered to be acceptable by the government. Iceland does not have an explicit population policy. Concern is instead focused upon improving rural health services. Population policy as it relates to development objectives is discussed, followed by consideration of specific policies adopted and measures taken to address above-mentioned problematic demographic indicators. The status of women and population data systems are also explored.
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  4. 4
    071900

    Hungary.

    United Nations. Department of International Economic and Social Affairs. Population Division

    In: World population policies. Volume II. Gabon to Norway, [compiled by] United Nations. Department of International Economic and Social Affairs. Population Division. New York, New York, United Nations, 1989. 54-7. (Population Studies No. 102/Add.1; ST/ESA/SER.A/102/Add.1)

    Hungary's 1985 population of 10,697,000 is projected to shrink to 10,598,000 by the year 2025. In 1985, 21.6% of the population was aged 0-14 years, while 18.2% were over the age of 60. 71.8% and 24.2% are projected to be in these respective age groups by the year 2025. The rate of natural increase will have declined from-0.3 to -0.6 over the period. Life expectancy should increase from 70.3 to 76.4 years, the crude death rate will decrease from 13.1 to 12.9, while infant mortality will decline from 20.1 to 7.0. The fertility rate will rise over the period from 1.9 to 2.0, with a corresponding drop in the crude birth rate from 12.9 to 12.3. The 1986 contraceptive prevalence rate was 73.0, while the 1980 female mean age at 1st marriage was 21.0 years. Urban population will increase from 56.2% in 1985 to 67.5% overall by the year 2025. Immigration, emigration, and spatial distribution are considered to be acceptable by the government, while population growth, morbidity, mortality, and fertility are not. Hungary has an explicit population policy. It hopes to increase population growth by increasing fertility and improving living conditions. Additionally, changes are sought in population age structure, mortality, and overall health status of the population. Population policy as it relates to development objectives is discussed, followed by consideration of specific policies adopted and measures taken to address above-mentioned problematic demographic indicators. The status of women and population data systems are also explored.
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  5. 5
    071892

    Greece.

    United Nations. Department of International Economic and Social Affairs. Population Division

    In: World population policies. Volume II. Gabon to Norway, [compiled by] United Nations. Department of International Economic and Social Affairs. Population Division. New York, New York, United Nations, 1989. 22-5. (Population Studies No. 102/Add.1; ST/ESA/SER.A/102/Add.1)

    Greece's 1985 population of 9,878,000 is projected to grow to 10,789,000 by the year 2025. In 1985, 21.5% of the population was aged 0-14 years, while 17.8% were over the age of 60. 18.6% and 23.8% are projected to be in these respective age groups by the year 2025. The rate of natural increase will have declined from 4.8 to 0.9 over the period. Life expectancy should increase from 74.0 to 77.7 years, the crude death rate will increase from 10.1 to 11.6, while infant mortality will decline from 16.2 to 8.0. The fertility rate will decline over the period from 2.2 to 2.0, with a corresponding drop in the crude birth rate from 14.9 to 12.5. Urban population will increase from 60.1% in 1985 to 79.1% overall by the year 2025. Spatial distribution, in part, and insignificant emigration are considered to be acceptable by the government, while population growth, morbidity, mortality, fertility, and immigration are not. Greece has an explicit population policy. The government hopes to increase fertility, population growth, and improve the quality of health care. Specifically, policy aims to remove disincentives to procreation through the betterment of social services and the quality of life. Population policy as it relates to development objectives is discussed, followed by consideration of specific policies adopted and measures taken to address above-mentioned problematic demographic indicators. The status of women and population data systems are also explored.
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  6. 6
    070214

    United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland.

    United Nations. Department of International Economic and Social Affairs. Population Division

    In: World population policies. Volume III. Oman to Zimbabwe, compiled by United Nations. Department of International Economic and Social Affairs. Population Division. New York, New York, United Nations, 1990. 186-9. (Population Studies No. 102/Add.2; ST/ESA/SER.A/102/Add.2)

    The United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland's 1985 population of 56,618,000 is projected to grow to 57,464,000 by the year 2025. In 1985, 19.2% of the population was aged 0-14 years, while 20.7% were over the age of 60. 17.2% and 27.5% are projected to be in these respective age groups by the year 2025. The rate of natural increase will have declined from 1.3 to -0.1 over the period. Life expectancy should increase from 74.0 to 79.6 years, the crude death rate will decrease from 11.7 to 11.5, while infant mortality will decline from 11.0 to 5.0. The fertility rate will rise over the period from 1.8 to 1.9, with a corresponding drop in the crude birth rate from 13.0 to 11.4. The 1983 contraceptive prevalence rate was 83, while the 1981 female mean age at 1st marriage was 22.8 years. Urban population will increase from 91.7% in 1985 to 95.8% overall by the year 2025. Population growth, fertility, spatial distribution, and low emigration are considered to be acceptable by the government, while mortality and high immigration are not. The United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland does not have an explicit population policy. Recent legislation has, however, been enacted to stem the flow of immigrants into the country. The government considers decisions on fertility and child-bearing best left to individuals and limits itself to providing family planning and health information and services. Population policy as it relates to development objectives is discussed, followed by consideration of specific policies adopted and measures taken to address above-mentioned problematic demographic indicators. The status of women and population data systems are also explored.
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  7. 7
    070201

    Switzerland.

    United Nations. Department of International Economic and Social Affairs. Population Division

    In: World population policies. Volume III. Oman to Zimbabwe, compiled by United Nations. Department of International Economic and Social Affairs. Population Division. New York, New York, United Nations, 1990. 134-7. (Population Studies No. 102/Add.2; ST/ESA/SER.A/102/Add.2)

    Switzerland's 1985 population of 6,470,000 is projected to shrink to 6,118,000 by the year 2025. In 1985, 16.9% of the population was aged 0-14 years, while 19.6% were over the age of 60. 14.3% and 33.7% are projected to be in these respective age groups by the year 2025. The rate of natural increase will have declined from 2.3 to --4.2 over the period. Life expectancy should increase from 76.3 to 80.6 years, the crude death rate will increase from 9.3 to 13.5, while infant mortality will decline from 8.0 to 5.0. The fertility rate will rise over the period from 1.5 to 1.7, with a corresponding drop in the crude birth rate from 11.6 to 9.3. The 1980 contraceptive prevalence rate was 71.2, while the 1980 female mean age at 1st marriage was 25.0 years. Urban population will increase from 58.2% in 1985 to 69.5% overall by the year 2025. Population growth, mortality, morbidity, spatial distribution, and international migration levels are considered to be acceptable by the government, while the low fertility level is not. Switzerland has an explicit population policy. Indirect measures will be applied in attempts to raise fertility. These would include improving the situation of families and children, and imposing more stringent regulations on immigration. Population policy as it related to development objectives is discussed, followed by consideration of specific policies adopted and measures taken to address above-mentioned problematic demographic indicators. The status of women and population data systems are also explored.
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  8. 8
    070200

    Sweden.

    United Nations. Department of International Economic and Social Affairs. Population Division

    In: World population policies. Volume III. Oman to Zimbabwe, compiled by United Nations. Department of International Economic and Social Affairs. Population Division. New York, New York, United Nations, 1990. 130-3. (Population Studies No. 102/Add.2; ST/ESA/SER.A/102/Add.2)

    Sweden's 1985 population of 8,350,000 is projected to shrink to 8,136,000 by the year 2025. In 1985, 17.5% of the population was aged 0-14 years, while 23.6% were over the age of 60. 15.6% and 30.0% are projected to be in these respective age groups by the year 2025. The rate of natural increase will have declined from 0.3 to -2.3 over the period. Life expectancy should increase from 76.3 to 80.6 years, the crude death rate will increase from 11.0 to 12.7, while infant mortality will decline from 7.0 to 5.0. The fertility rate will rise over the period from 1.7 to 1.8, with a corresponding drop in the crude birth rate from 11.3 to 10.4. The 1981 contraceptive prevalence rate was 78.1, while the 1980 female mean age at 1st marriage was 27.6 years. Urban population will increase from 83.4% in 1985 to 90.5% overall by the year 2025. All of these indicators and trends are considered to be acceptable by the government while only spatial distribution is marginally not. Sweden does not have an explicit population policy. Population policies are part and parcel of broader socioeconomic policy, with, nonetheless, an interest in limiting future levels of immigration and adjusting urban-rural spatial imbalance. Population policy as it relates to development objectives is discussed, followed by consideration of specific policies adopted and measures taken to address above-mentioned problematic demographic indicators. The status of women and population data systems are also explored.
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  9. 9
    070184

    Spain.

    United Nations. Department of International Economic and Social Affairs. Population Division

    In: World population policies. Volume III. Oman to Zimbabwe, compiled by United Nations. Department of International Economic and Social Affairs. Population Division. New York, New York, United Nations, 1990. 110-3. (Population Studies No. 102/Add.2; ST/ESA/SER.A/102/Add.2)

    Spain's 1985 population of 38,602,000 is projected to grown to 42,530,000 by the year 2025. In 1985, 22.9% of the population was aged 0-14 years, while 17.1% were over the age of 60. 16.6% and 26.1% are projected to be in these respective age groups by the year 2025. The rate of natural increase will have declined from 5.6 to 0.8 over the period. Life expectancy should increase from 75.8 to 80.3 years, the crude birth death rate will increase from 7.7 to 10.3, while infant mortality will decline from 11.0 to 6.0. The fertility rate will rise over the period from 1.8 to 1.9, with a corresponding drop in the crude birth rate from 13.3 to 11.0. The 1985 contraceptive prevalence rate was 59.4, while the 1981 female mean age at 1st marriage was 23.1 years. Urban population will increase from 75.8% in 1985 to 88.8% overall by the year 2025. All of these indicators and trends are considered to be acceptable by the government. Spain, therefore, does not have an explicit population policy. The government considers the country's demographic situation to be stable, and deems fertility to be an individual matter. Population policy as it related to development objectives is discussed, followed by consideration of specific policies adopted and measures taken regarding the above-mentioned demographic indicators. The status of women and population data systems are also explored.
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  10. 10
    070167

    Portugal.

    United Nations. Department of International Economic and Social Affairs. Population Division

    In: World population policies. Volume III. Oman to Zimbabwe, compiled by United Nations. Department of International Economic and Social Affairs. Population Division. New York, New York, United Nations, 1990. 34-7. (Population Studies No. 102/Add.2; ST/ESA/SER.A/102/Add.2)

    Portugal's 1985 population of 10,157,000 is projected to grow to 10,935,000 by the year 2025. In 1985, 23.5% of the population was aged 0-14 years, while 17.0% were over the age of 60. 17.1% and 24.8% are projected to be in these respective age groups by the year 2025. The rate of natural increase will have declined from 5.1 to 0.8 over the period. Life expectancy should increase from 72.2 to 78.8 years, the crude death rate will increase from 9.6 to 10.6, while infant mortality will decline from 20.0 to 6.0. The fertility rate will decline over the period from 2.0 to 1.9, with a corresponding drop in the crude birth rate from 14.7 to 11.4. The 1979/80 contraceptive prevalence rate was 66.3, while the 1981 female mean age at 1st marriage was 22.1 years. Urban population will increase from 31.2% in 1985 to 57.8% overall by the year 2025. Population growth, fertility, immigration, and emigration are considered to be acceptable by the government, while mortality and spatial distribution are not. Portugal does not have an explicit population policy. Socioeconomic measures are, however, in place to address spatial distribution, and support emigration and the return of emigrants, education, social security, health, and family planning. Population policy as it relates to development objectives is discussed, followed by consideration of specific policies adopted and measures taken to address above-mentioned problematic demographic indicators. The status of women and population data system are also explored.
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  11. 11
    070166

    Poland.

    United Nations. Department of International Economic and Social Affairs. Population Division

    In: World population policies. Volume III. Oman to Zimbabwe, compiled by United Nations. Department of International Economic and Social Affairs. Population Division. New York, New York, United Nations, 1990. 30-3. (Population Studies No. 102/Add.2; ST/ESA/SER.A/102/Add.2)

    Poland's 1985 population of 37,203,000 is projected to grow to 45,066,000 by the year 2025. In 1985, 25.5% of the population was aged 0-14 years, while 13,8% were over the age of 60. 19.6% and 22.2% are projected to be in these respective age groups by the year 2025. The rate of natural increase will have declined from 9.6 to 3.3 over the period. Life expectancy should increase from 70.9 to 77.3 years, the crude death rate will increase from 9.6 to 9.8, while infant mortality will decline from 20.0 to 7.0. The fertility rate will decline over the period from 2.3 to 2.1, with a corresponding drop in the crude birth rate from 19.2 to 13.1. The 1977 contraceptive prevalence rate was 75.0, while the 1984 female mean age at 1st marriage was 22.8 years. Urban population will increase from 61.0% in 1985 to 71.0% overall by the year 2025. Population size and growth, fertility, immigration, and spatial distribution are considered to be acceptable by the government, while population age structure, mortality, morbidity, and too high emigration are not. Poland has an explicit population policy. Aiming to establish a stable population, policies control internal migration while governing efforts to improve mortality and living conditions. Population policy as it relates to development objectives is discussed, followed by consideration of specific policies adopted and measures taken to address above-mentioned problematic demographic indicators. The status of women and population data systems are also explored.
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