Important: The POPLINE website will retire on September 1, 2019. Click here to read about the transition.

Your search found 4 Results

  1. 1
    801588
    Peer Reviewed

    A preliminary pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic evaluation of depot-medroxyprogesterone acetate and norethisterone oenanthate.

    Fotherby K; Saxena BN; Shrimanker K; Hingorani V; Takker D; Diczfalusy E; Landgren B-M

    Fertility and Sterility. 1980 Aug; 34(2):131-9.

    2 populations attending WHO centers, one in Sweden and one in India, participated in a comparative, pilot trial of 2 increasingly popular injectable progestin-only female contraceptives, Depo-Provera and Norigest. The purpose of the study was to assess the pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic properties of the 2 formulations (depot medroxyprogesterone acetate and norethisterone enanthate). Differences were found between Swedish women and Indian women in their reactions to the 2 drugs: 1) Norigest was detectable in blood samples a significantly shorter time after injection of the agent in Indian women than in Swedish women; this difference was not apparent with Depo-Provera. 2) Although there was no difference at the 2 centers in the time of ovulation return for subjects receiving Norigest, 0 of 4 Swedish women ovulated more than 156 days after Depo-Provera injection, whereas all 4 Indian women ovulated within 73 days of Depo-Provera injection; in the Swedish women, the levels of medroxyprogesterone were undetectable at time of return to ovulation, whereas Indian women had levels of .6 ng/ml when ovulation resumed. 3) In both cultures, Depo-Provera users had significantly more episodes of bleeding and spotting than Norigest users. This preliminary report emphasizes the variety of responses possible to injection of different contraceptive progestins among various populations and points to the need for further culturally comparative studies.
    Add to my documents.
  2. 2
    777328

    Deaths among pill users in Britain.

    IPPF Medical Bulletin. 1977 Oct; 11(5):1-2.

    Lancet recently published 2 papers which reported research fundings indicating that oral contraceptive users, over 35 years of age, are at greater risk of death from cardiovascular disease than nonusers. The findings also suggested that oral contraceptive users who have taken the pill for more than 5 years, who smoke, or who have diabetes, hypertension, or obesity are also at increased risk of death than nonusers. In view of these findings the Presidents of the Royal College of General Practitioners and of the Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists revised oral contraceptive prescribing recommendations. According to the new recommendations 1) women, who are under 30 years of age, can continue to use the pill but if they smoke they should be advised to quit smoking; 2) women, between 30-35 years of age, can continue to use the pill but if they have taken the pill for 5 or more years and if they smoke they should be advised to switch to other contraceptive methods; and 3) women, over 35 years of age, should be advised to use other contraceptive methods. The British Committee on Safety of Medicines did not issue new prescribing instructions. The International Planned Parenthood Federation, noting the findings of both U.S. and British studies, said that physicians should be aware that the risk of death from cardiovascular disease may be enhanced for oral contraceptive users over the age of 40. The Federation also recommended that couples with completed families should consider sterilization or other alternative forms of contraception.
    Add to my documents.
  3. 3
    746473

    The condom: increasing utilization in the United States.

    Redford MH; Duncan GW; Prager DJ

    San Francisco, San Francisco Press, 1974. 292 p.

    Despite its high effectiveness, lack of side effects, ease of use, and low cost, condom utilization has declined in the U.S. from 30% of contracepting couples in 1955 to 15% in 1970. The present status of the condom, actions needed to facilitate its increased availability and acceptance, and research required to improve understanding of factors affecting its use are reviewed in the proceedings of a conference on the condom sponsored by the Battelle Population Study Center in 1973. It is concluded that condom use in the U.S. is not meeting its potential. Factors affecting its underutilization include negative attitudes among the medical and family planning professions; state laws restricting sales outlets, display, and advertising; inapplicable testing standards; the National Association of Broadcasters' ban on contraceptive advertising; media's reluctance to carry condom ads; manufacturer's hesitancy to widen the range of products and use aggressive marketing techniques; and physical properties of the condom itself. Further, the condom has an image problem, tending to be associated with venereal disease and prostitution and regarded as a hassle to use and an impediment to sexual sensation. Innovative, broad-based marketing and sales through a variety of outlets have been key to effective widespread condom usage in England, Japan, and Sweden. Such campaigns could be directed toward couples who cannot or will not use other methods and teenagers whose unplanned, sporadic sexual activity lends itself to condom use. Other means of increasing U.S. condom utilization include repealing state and local laws restricting condom sales to pharmacies and limiting open display; removing the ban on contraceptive advertising and changing the attitude of the media; using educational programs to correct erroneous images; and developing support for condom distribution in family planning programs. Also possible is modifying the extreme stringency of condom standards. Thinner condoms could increase usage without significantly affecting failure rates. More research is needed on condom use-effectiveness in potential user populations and in preventing venereal disease transmission; the effects of condom shape, thickness, and lubrication on consumer acceptance; reactions to condom advertising; and the point at which an acceptable level of utilization has been achieved.
    Add to my documents.
  4. 4
    744974

    [Family planning: Organization, experiences, suggestions] Familienplanung: Organisation, Erfahrungen, Vorsclage.

    Hobbing E

    In: Staemmler, H.-J., ed. Geburtenplannung. Statistik, Erfahrungen und Konsequenzen. (Birth control. Statistics, experiences and results.) Stut tgart, Georg Thieme Verlag, 1974. p. 81-85

    The activities of Pro Familia, the West German Society for Sexual Co unseling and Family Planning, are described. The Society participates in the activities of many international organizations of medical and social interest as a member of the International Planned Parenthood Federation. In Germany, Pro Familia offers courses for physicians, counselors and day people, and a variety of educational progrmas for all ages. Physicians working with Pro Familia receive a 5-day training course, and are encouraged to complete deficient aspects of their education in sexuality, family planning, and reproduction. The Society maintains 45 centers and several mobile units to carry programs to underprivileged neighborhoods. The age of clients has declined steadily from a minimum of 16 5 years ago to 13-14 years now; 12-year-olds are sometimes seen. Help is sought not only in questions of fertility and contraception, but also in marital, sexual, and emotional problems of all types.
    Add to my documents.