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Your search found 5 Results

  1. 1
    273100

    List of research projects funded since 1980, by Scientific Working Group and broad priority area.

    World Health Organization [WHO]. Programme for Control of Diarrhoeal Diseases

    [Unpublished] 1986. 80 p. (WHO/CDD/84.17)

    This listing of research projects funded since 1980 by the Diarrheal Diseases Control Program of the WHO is arranged by broad priority area and scientific working group. Project title, investigator, and budget allocation for each are listed. Scientific working groups which are included are: bacterial enteric infections, parasitic diarrheas, viral diarrheas, drug development and management of acute diarrheas, global/global groups, global/regional groups, and research strengthening activities. Projects are also classified according to geographic area: African region, American region, Eastern Meditterranean region, European region, Southeast Asia region, and Western Pacific region.
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  2. 2
    273053

    List of research projects funded since 1980, by Scientific Working Group and broad priority area.

    World Health Organization [WHO]. Programme for Control of Diarrhoeal Diseases

    [Unpublished] 1984. 51 p.

    This listing of research projects funded since 1980 by WHO's Diarrhoeal Diseases Control Programme, is arranged by project title, investigator and annual budget allocations. Project titles are listed by Scientific Working Grouping (SWG) and include research on bacterial enteric infections; parasitic diarrheas; viral diarrheas; drug development and management of acute diarrheas; global and regional groups and research strengthening activities. SWG projects are furthermore divided by geographical region: African, American, Eastern Medierranean, European, Southeast Asian and Western Pacific. The priority area for research within each SWG is specified.
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  3. 3
    165609
    Peer Reviewed

    HIV / AIDS surges in Eastern Europe -- Asia-Pacific next?

    Agnew B

    Bulletin of the World Health Organization. 2002; 80(1):78.

    According to the AIDS Epidemic Update released in November 2001 by the Joint UN Program on HIV/AIDS (UNAIDS), HIV/AIDS infection is escalating globally. The disease is spreading most quickly in Eastern Europe and Central Asia, where an estimated 1 million people are now infected with the disease. Furthermore, statistics show that about 5 million people were infected with HIV in 2001 (versus 5.3 million in 2000) and an estimated 40 million (versus 36.1 million) are believed to be living with the virus worldwide. In response to this threat, prevention and aggressive harm-reduction programs are at work, according to the Director-General of WHO, Dr. Gro Harlem Brundtland. He cited several Asian countries, like Thailand and Cambodia, whose efforts of prevention are effectively working in reducing the incidence of HIV/AIDS. Poland and several African states have also shown exemplified actions in controlling the epidemic. Dr. Jesus Maria Garcia Calleja, a UNAIDS epidemiologist stressed the need of will and commitment from all sectors to prevent further outbreak. In Eastern Europe and Central Asia, since the spread is still in its early stages, a comprehensive response is needed to reduce risky sexual and drug-injecting behavior among young people, and to tackle the socioeconomic and other factors that promote the spread of the virus.
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  4. 4
    156412

    WHO board addresses health of women, children.

    NATION'S HEALTH. 2001 Apr; 15.

    One topic discussed at the annual January session of the WHO's executive board was the general health and well-being of young children and mothers. The 32 members met in Geneva for a week to develop policy standards in various issues, including promoting a global strategy for infant and child feeding and nutrition, strengthening nursing and midwifery and making pregnancy safer. The board members adopted a resolution aimed at improving the nutrition of women of reproductive age and supporting breastfeeding. They also stressed the importance of increasing nursing and midwifery work. Other significant issues discussed included epidemic alert and response measures, health services performance assessment, HIV/AIDS, mental health, the Roll Back Malaria program, polio eradication, tobacco control, and schistosomiasis.
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  5. 5
    038364

    IPPF involvement in the International Youth Year: a progress report.

    International Planned Parenthood Federation [IPPF]

    [London, England], IPPF, 1986 Jan 31. 5, 13 p.

    This report provides a brief description of the International Planned Parenthood Federation's (IPPF) involvement in and contributions to International Youth Year (IYY). IYY reinforced an IPPF priority program area for the 1980s--meeting the needs of young people--and all member family planning associations were encouraged to establish links with IYY national coordinating committees. IPPF was also instrumental in the formation of a nongovernmental Working Group on Family Life Education comprised of representatives from a range of organizations involved in youth work and is preparing a resource book on family life education for these groups. The guidelines for action for IYY, prepared by a United Nations Advisory Committee in which IPPF was a major participant, urge governments to promote culturally appropriate family life education, encourage young people and their organizations to be active in the implementation of population programs, promote social policies to strengthen the family, encourage community education to counteract adolescent pregnancy, and ensure that family life and sex education are available to young people. Where necessary, family planning information and services can be made available to adolescents within a country's sociocultural context. There is a need to sustain the global interst in youth concerns generated by IYY and to translate into action the recommendations and resolutions on youth that were developed. It is essential that such action consider factors such as the promotion and protection of the rights and responsibilities of young people, sensitivity to local traditions, identification and mobilization of local resources, interagency cooperation, and involvement of young people in decision making. The document concludes with progress reports from 30 countries on family planning association activities in support of IYY.
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