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Your search found 3 Results

  1. 1
    135004
    Peer Reviewed

    Cardiovascular disease and use of oral and injectable progestogen-only contraceptives and combined injectable contraceptives. Results of an international, multicenter, case-control study. World Health Organization Collaborative Study of Cardiovascular Disease and Steroid Hormone Contraception.

    Poulter NR; Chang CL; Farley TM; Marmot MG; Meirik O

    CONTRACEPTION. 1998 May; 57(5):315-24.

    As part of a World Health Organization Collaborative Study conducted at 21 centers in Africa, Asia, Europe, and Latin America in 1989-93, the risks of cardiovascular disease associated with use of oral and injectable progestogen-only and combined injectable contraceptives were investigated. 3697 cases of cardiovascular disease (59% stroke, 31% venous thromboembolism, and 10% acute myocardial infarction) were available for analysis and age-matched with up to three controls. 53 cases were current users of oral progestogen-only contraception, 37 were using an injectable progestogen-only method, and 13 were using combined injectable contraception. The adjusted odds ratios for all cardiovascular diseases compared with nonusers of any type of steroid hormone contraceptive were 1.4 (95% confidence interval (CI), 0.79-1.63) for current users of oral progestogen-only methods, 1.02 (95% CI, 0.68-1.54) for users of injectable progestogen-only contraceptives, and 0.95 (95% CI, 0.49-1.86) for use of combined injectable contraceptives. No significant changes in risk for stroke, venous thromboembolism, or acute myocardial infarction or these three conditions combined was apparent in association with any of the contraceptive methods. However, a nonsignificant increase in risk of venous thromboembolism was apparent for both types of progestogen-only contraceptives. Among women with a history of hypertension, the odds ratio for stroke rose from 7.2 (95% CI, 6.1-8.5) among nonusers of any type of steroid hormonal contraceptive method to 12.4 (95% CI, 4.1-37.6) among current users of all oral progestogens.
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  2. 2
    228907

    Changing mortality patterns in men.

    Kesteloot H; Yuan X; Joossens JV

    ACTA CARDIOLOGICA. 1988; 43(2):133-9.

    Age-adjusted mortality trends among men aged 35 to 74 in developed countries are analyzed for the last 35 years using WHO data for seven selected countries. "Mortality from all causes has shown the greatest decrease in Japan and the greatest increase in Hungary. From 1970 on cardiovascular mortality demonstrates a downward trend in all countries, except in Sweden where it remains virtually unchanged and Hungary where it rises markedly. Cancer mortality shows an upward trend which levels off during the last 15 years with the exception of Hungary. Changes in dietary and smoking habits and mass treatment of hypertension offer the most plausible explanation for the observed changes." (EXCERPT)
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  3. 3
    777328

    Deaths among pill users in Britain.

    IPPF Medical Bulletin. 1977 Oct; 11(5):1-2.

    Lancet recently published 2 papers which reported research fundings indicating that oral contraceptive users, over 35 years of age, are at greater risk of death from cardiovascular disease than nonusers. The findings also suggested that oral contraceptive users who have taken the pill for more than 5 years, who smoke, or who have diabetes, hypertension, or obesity are also at increased risk of death than nonusers. In view of these findings the Presidents of the Royal College of General Practitioners and of the Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists revised oral contraceptive prescribing recommendations. According to the new recommendations 1) women, who are under 30 years of age, can continue to use the pill but if they smoke they should be advised to quit smoking; 2) women, between 30-35 years of age, can continue to use the pill but if they have taken the pill for 5 or more years and if they smoke they should be advised to switch to other contraceptive methods; and 3) women, over 35 years of age, should be advised to use other contraceptive methods. The British Committee on Safety of Medicines did not issue new prescribing instructions. The International Planned Parenthood Federation, noting the findings of both U.S. and British studies, said that physicians should be aware that the risk of death from cardiovascular disease may be enhanced for oral contraceptive users over the age of 40. The Federation also recommended that couples with completed families should consider sterilization or other alternative forms of contraception.
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