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  1. 1
    374608

    Women’s labour migration: an overview from Mexico, Moldova and the Philippines.

    United Nations. UN Women

    New York, New York, UN Women, [2017]. 7 p. (Policy Brief No. 1)

    UN Women’s project "Promoting and Protecting Women Migrant Workers’ Labour and Human Rights: Engaging with International, National Human Rights Mechanisms to Enhance Accountability" is a global project funded by the European Union (EU) and anchored nationally in three pilot countries: Mexico, Moldova, and the Philippines. The project promotes women migrant workers’ rights and their protection against exclusion and exploitation at all stages of migration. One of the key results of the project has been the production of high-quality knowledge products. These have provided the foundation of the project’s advocacy and capacity building objectives. This Brief draws from the project’s knowledge products and provides an overview of the key situational and policy concerns for women migrant workers in each of the three pilot countries.
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  2. 2
    337116

    Road-mapping a total market approach: Eastern Europe and Central Asia Workshops.

    United Nations Population Fund [UNFPA]; PATH

    Seattle, Washington, PATH, 2013 Apr. [24] p.

    To meet the challenge of sustaining reproductive health commodity security in Eastern Europe and Central Asia, the United Nations Population Fund and PATH developed workshops to increase awareness about total market approaches and develop an action plan for the region. This report describes two regional workshops that were held in April 2013.
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  3. 3
    337115

    Road-mapping a total market approach for family planning and reproductive health commodity security. Workshop materials.

    United Nations Population Fund [UNFPA]; PATH

    Seattle, Washington, PATH, 2013. [40] p.

    To meet the challenge of sustaining reproductive health commodity security in Eastern Europe and Central Asia, the United Nations Population Fund and PATH developed workshops to increase awareness about total market approaches and develop an action plan for the region. These workshop materials are from two regional workshops that were held in April 2013.
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  4. 4
    335035

    Experiences from the field: HIV prevention among most at risk adolescents in Central and Eastern Europe and the Commonwealth of Independent States.

    UNICEF. Regional Office for Central and Eastern Europe and the Commonwealth of Independent States

    Geneva, Switzerland, UNICEF, Regional Office for Central and Eastern Europe and the Commonwealth of Independent States, [2013]. [122] p.

    This document shares experiences in an effort to support programmers, policymakers, and donors to carry out and strengthen further programming among most-at-risk-adolescents (MARA) and other vulnerable adolescents in the Central and Eastern Europe and the Commonwealth of Independent States Region and beyond. It presents programming experiences from Albania, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Moldova, Montenegro, Romania, Serbia, and Ukraine. The overarching goal of these programs has been to promote HIV prevention among MARA and to ensure their integration into national HIV / AIDS program strategies and monitoring and evaluation frameworks.
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  5. 5
    339649

    Investing in young people: UNFPA’s commitment to advancing the rightsof adolescents and youth in the eastern Europe and central Asia (EECA)Region.

    Fierens T

    Entre Nous. 2009; 69:4-5.

    Investing in young people is an investment in the future. Yet more than half of young people throughout the globe live in poverty. Impoverished youth are particularly at risk of gender discrimination, poor schooling, unemployment and poor access to health services. They are also less likely to know of, claim and exercise their rights to reproductive health information and services.
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  6. 6
    339805

    Krakow Statement [on Children's Rights].

    East-Central European Forum of NGOs on Child Issues on the Tenth Anniversary of the Convention on the Rights of the Child (1999: Krakow)

    [Unpublished] 1999. [1] p.

    This statement regards the Convention on the Rights of the Child in Poland and other Eastern and Central European countries. It discusses initiatives that the participants urge all governments to implement for children's rights and to eliminate child poverty, discrimination, and dangerous work situations.
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  7. 7
    325498

    Prevention of HIV infection in infants: Documenting and learning from the Ukraine experience.

    Thorne C; Newell ML; Zhylka N

    Kyiv, Ukraine, UNICEF, 2007. 100 p.

    The aim of this review is to document the experience of PMTCT in Ukraine to date, highlighting the strengths and weaknesses of lessons learned within the current PMTCT programme. The report is structured around the four pillars of PMTCT: primary prevention of HIV infection within the context of MTCT; prevention of unintended pregnancies among HIV positive women; prevention of transmission from HIV positive women to their child; providing care and support to HIV positive women, their infants and their family. Since the initiation of the first national PMTCT programme in Ukraine in 2001, Ukraine has made substantial progress towards prevention of HIV infection in infants. Evaluation of the first programme in 2003 by a national and international team, including WHO and UNICEF, allowed consolidation of effort and the development of the next phase of the PMTCT programme. Furthermore, the findings facilitated the development of 'The Strategic Framework for the Prevention of HIV Infection in Infants in Europe' (2004). This outlined strategies for the implementation of the prevention of HIV infection in infants at a national level, with the aim of achieving the Dublin Declaration PMTCT goals. (excerpt)
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  8. 8
    322594

    A nongovernmental organization's national response to HIV: the work of the All-Ukrainian Network of People Living with HIV.

    Joint United Nations Programme on HIV / AIDS [UNAIDS]

    Geneva, Switzerland, UNAIDS, 2007 Jul. 47 p. (UNAIDS Best Practice Collection; UNAIDS/07.23E; JC1305E)

    The All-Ukrainian Network of People Living with HIV/AIDS (the 'Network') was formed in the late 1990s by HIV-positive individuals alarmed at the surging HIV epidemic in their country and the lack of resources and support for themselves and others living with the virus. It has grown rapidly and steadily since then, providing services and support to more than 14 000 people living with HIV. Its roots are in the self-help ethos, based on the belief that people living with HIV must be directly involved in leading national and local responses to HIV. The Network's four key strategy components are: increasing access to non-medical care, treatment and support; lobbying and advocating to protect the rights of people living with HIV; seeking to increase acceptance towards people living with HIV throughout society; and enhancing the organizational capacity of the Network. (excerpt)
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  9. 9
    321375
    Peer Reviewed

    The introduction of confidential enquiries into maternal deaths and near-miss case reviews in the WHO European region.

    Bacci A; Lewis G; Baltag V; Bertran AP

    Reproductive Health Matters. 2007 Sep; 15(30):145-152.

    Most maternal deaths can be averted with known, effective interventions but countries require information about which women are dying and why, and what can been done to prevent such deaths in future. This paper describes the introduction of two approaches to reviewing maternal deaths and severe obstetric complications in 12 countries in transition in the WHO European Region - national-level confidential enquiries into maternal deaths and facility-based near-miss case reviews. Initially, two regional meetings involving stakeholders from 12 countries were held in 2004-2005, followed by national meetings in seven of the countries. The Republic of Moldova was the first to pilot the review process, preceded by a technical workshop to make detailed plans, provide training in how to facilitate and carry out a review, finalise clinical guidelines against which the findings of the confidential enquiry and near-miss case review could be judged, and a range of other preparatory work. To date, near-miss case reviews have been carried out in the three main referral hospitals in Moldova, and a national committee appointed by the Ministry of Health to conduct the confidential enquiry has met twice. Several other countries have begun a similar process, but progress may remain slow due to continuing fears of punitive actions against health professionals who have a mother or baby die in their care. (author's)
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  10. 10
    320929

    Labour migration in Eastern Europe and Central Asia: current issues and next political steps.

    Patzwaldt K

    [Paris, France], UNESCO, International Migration and Multicultural Policies Section, 2004 Jun 1. 16 p. (UNESCO Series of Country Reports on the Ratification of the UN Convention on Migrants; SHS/2004/MC/3)

    With the UN Convention on the Protection of the Rights of All Migrant Workers and Members of Their Families having entered into force on July 1, 2003, the UNESCO Central and East European Network on Migration Research (CEENOM) has got both a new focus on migrant workers and a new instrument for policy recommendations to national governments. The aim of the present research and analysis is therefore to identify, which obstacles impede the accession of Eastern European and Central Asian countries to the convention and how these could be overcome. Additionally, debate on the provisions of the convention highlights the need for protection of migrant workers and stimulates the search for feasible solutions to labour migration related problems. Finally, it strengthens the link between Central and Eastern European research institutes and policy-makers involved by concentrating on the role and consequences of this distinct legal instrument. (excerpt)
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  11. 11
    320366

    European Union. Managing migration means potential EU complicity in neighboring states' abuse of migrants and refugees.

    Human Rights Watch

    New York, New York, Human Rights Watch, 2006 Oct. 22 p. (Human Rights Watch No. 2)

    Irregular migration into the European Union (EU) poses clear challenges for European governments. Few would question the urgent need for policies to address these challenges. However, the common EU policy in this area is primarily focussed on keeping migrants and asylum seekers out of and away from Europe. The rights of migrants and refugee protection are marginalized. This briefing paper summarizes recent trends in the EU's approach. Through case studies of conditions in, and EU policies toward, Ukraine and Libya, it critiques current EU "externalization" practices. After noting some hopeful signs toward enhanced protection for asylum seekers and migrants, it concludes with recommendations to the EU and its member states. (excerpt)
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  12. 12
    319683

    USAID / Moldova antitrafficking assessment -- critical gaps in and recommendations for antitrafficking activities.

    Arnold J; Doni C

    Washington, D.C., Development Alternatives, WID Tech, 2002 Oct. [65] p. (USAID Contract No. FAO-0100-C-00-6005-00)

    The objective of this assessment is twofold: (1) to provide USAID/Western New Independent States (WNIS) with a road map of existing trafficking-prevention activities undertaken by donor agencies and bilateral, international-development and host-country-government institutions and nongovernmental organizations (NGOs) in Moldova; and (2) to help USAID/WNIS identify critical gaps in existing approaches in Moldova that new interventions might address. The road map and accompanying list of recommendations provide U.S. government officials in USAID/WNIS with the information and tools necessary to design specific activities at a later date. (excerpt)
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  13. 13
    306528
    Peer Reviewed

    Multidrug-resistant tuberculosis management in resource-limited settings.

    Nathanson E; Lambregts-van Weezenbeek C; Rich ML; Gupta R; Bayona J

    Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2006 Sep; 12(9):1389-1397.

    Evidence of successful management of multidrugresistant tuberculosis (MDRTB) is mainly generated from referral hospitals in high-income countries. We evaluate the management of MDRTB in 5 resource-limited countries: Estonia, Latvia, Peru, the Philippines, and the Russian Federation. All projects were approved by the Green Light Committee for access to quality-assured second-line drugs provided at reduced price for MDRTB management. Of 1,047 MDRTB patients evaluated, 119 (11%) were new, and 928 (89%) had received treatment previously. More than 50% of previously treated patients had received both first- and second-line drugs, and 65% of all patients had infections that were resistant to both first- and second-line drugs. Treatment was successful in 70% of all patients, but success rate was higher among new (77%) than among previously treated patients (69%). In resource-limited settings, treatment of MDRTB provided through, or in collaboration with, national TB programs can yield results similar to those from wealthier settings. (author's)
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  14. 14
    303298

    Fighting AIDS: HIV / STI prevention and care activities in a military and peacekeeping setting in Ukraine. Country report.

    Khodakevich L

    Geneva, Switzerland, Joint United Nations Programme on HIV / AIDS [UNAIDS], Office on AIDS, Security and Humanitarian Response, 2004 Feb. 43 p. (UNAIDS Series: Engaging Uniformed Services in the Fight against AIDS. Case Study 2.)

    Ukraine has one of the highest HIV prevalence rates in Eastern Europe. It was first in the region to face an aggressive epidemic among injecting drug users in 1995, and the epidemic now appears to have entered a more generalized phase. The Government of Ukraine responded to HIV at an early stage. Several Presidential Decrees urged the Government to initiate and enhance activities against the epidemics, and mobilize various ministries including the Ministry of Defence. In June 1999 the heads of the Educational Branch in the Preventive Medicine Department of the Ministry of Defence (MoD) met with UNAIDS officials and discussed HIV/AIDS issues in the Ukrainian army. The meeting resulted in an agreement to launch a project on prevention of HIV/AIDS and sexually transmitted infections (STIs) in Ukraine's armed forces. Funds and technical support were provided by UNAIDS, and the Main Educational Department started implementation of the project with the assistance of the United Nations Population Fund (UNFPA). The project focused on the development of training and educational materials, integration of education about HIV/STI prevention in the curricula of the Humanitarian Institute of the National Academy of Defence and the Kharkiv Tank Forces Institute, and on cascade training (cascading information down to all levels of rank and file) of the officers and soldiers in five field garrisons. Around 20,000 servicemen were trained in the first phase. The second phase of the project will run to early 2004 and the army headquarters are applying for resources from the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and AIDS in order to strengthen these activities. During the second phase of the project 350,000 servicemen are to be targeted with comprehensive information and education relating to HIV/AIDS and STIs. (excerpt)
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  15. 15
    302593
    Peer Reviewed

    Ukraine fights to re-instate loan for HIV/AIDS project.

    Ahmad K

    Lancet Infectious Diseases. 2006 Jun; 6(6):328.

    Ukraine plans to restructure a key HIV/ AIDS and tuberculosis control project to help ensure disbursement of a US$60 million loan recently suspended by the World Bank. Alla Shcherbinska (Ukrainian Centre to Combat HIV/AIDS) told journalists that it will take the government only a few weeks to "reconstruct" the project. However, Shiyan Chao, a senior health economist at the World Bank cautioned that: "resumption of the funds will hinge on the government's concrete actions to improve earlier shortcomings related to policy issues on tuberculosis control, procurement, fiduciary controls, and other important aspects of project management". The World Bank suspended the loan, complaining of poor implementation by the Ukrainian ministry of health. "At the time of suspension, which came after the first 3 years of implementation, only 2% of funds available for this project had been disbursed by the Ukrainian ministry of health", Merrell Tuck, a spokesperson of the Bank said. The Bank says "there is also concern about the government's full commitment to both condom use and harm reduction for injecting drug users [IDUs]". (excerpt)
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  16. 16
    300913

    Report on series of workshops "Leadership for Results". UNDP in Ukraine. May, 24-31 2004.

    United Nations Development Programme [UNDP]

    [Kyiv], Ukraine, UNDP, 2004. [61] p.

    The United Nations Development Program (UNDP) organized a series of "Leadership for Results" workshops on May 24-31 2004 to develop and boost leadership skills of several participants' categories: trade union leaders, public figures, physicians, women-leaders, Peer Education Program trainers, etc. Allan Henderson, who facilitated this workshop, pointed out that "these workshops are not meant to make leaders of those who are not leaders, but rather to provide the opportunity for people who already are leaders to step out of the day-to-day business and address their own development." The task for participants is to improve themselves and society, to get to the higher leadership level, to develop more holistic outlook and support leadership skills with more comprehensive background. The structure of this leadership workshop stipulates three meetings with three months intervals. Methods applied in the workshop are as follows: education (knowledge transfer); training (practice of skill development) and coaching (establishing new opportunities for the future). The first workshop on May 24-25 that UNDP held jointly with the International Labor Organization (ILO) welcomed over 70 leaders from four most active trade union associations in Ukraine. It was just recently that trade unions started paying attention to the problem of HIV/AIDS. For the majority of participants it was their first workshop. (excerpt)
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  17. 17
    300912

    Personal commitment, concrete actions. Leadership in action.

    United Nations Development Programme [UNDP]

    Kyiv, Ukraine, UNDP, [2004]. 15 p.

    Ukraine is at a critical point in its response to the HIV/AIDS epidemic. The country has the highest rate of HIV infection prevalence in Europe and the CIS, about one per cent of the adult population. At the heart of generating an effective national response on HIV/AIDS are committed, mobilized leaders who are speaking out and taking action in their respective spheres of influence. Analysis of successful responses around the globe has highlighted leadership as a key ingredient for overcoming stigma and effective action in both prevention and care. Leaders for an effective national response must come from all levels of society -- national, regional and local Government; NGOs; media; schools; youth organizations; and the household. In modern, democratic Ukraine, citizens enjoy unprecedented freedoms and choices. Each leads his or her own life in a very personal way. Faced with the present onslaught of HIV/AIDS such individuals need basic information and support for their safe behaviour choices to avoid infection, for their compassion for those living with the virus and for their inclusion in the nationwide response. (excerpt)
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  18. 18
    300911

    Ukraine human development report. Special edition 2003. Ukraine and HIV / AIDS: time to act.

    United Nations Development Programme [UNDP]

    Kyiv, Ukraine, UNDP, 2003. 36 p.

    Ukraine is a young nation on the move. The national response to HIV/AIDS is also gathering pace. It is bringing together fresh coalitions of people, leaders and institutions who want to stop the further spread of this virus and to ensure care for those who are in need. The good news for all is that there are now known ways of preventing the spread of the virus and treatment is increasingly available. The challenge remains immense -- to some overwhelming. The insidious nature of the virus is that it attacks men and women in the prime of their life -- between the ages of 15 and 40. It robs children of their parents, and society of its productive citizens. Limited budgets and ungrounded stigma have severely hampered a scaled-up nationwide response. Positive rhetoric is helpful, but it needs to be matched by personal commitment and concrete actions. With the infusion of new resources, now is the time to remove the log jams and unleash a broad-based national effort to change the current course of the epidemic. As the Secretary General of the United Nations Kofi Annan recently said, "We have come a long way, but not far enough. Clearly, we will have to work harder to ensure that our commitment is matched by the necessary resources and action." (excerpt)
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  19. 19
    300910

    HIV / AIDS programme strategic framework. Making the possible happen.

    United Nations Development Programme [UNDP]

    [Kyiv], Ukraine, UNDP, [2004]. 11 p.

    HIV/AIDS presents the greatest challenge to human development the world has ever seen. With nearly 42 million people living with HIV/ AIDS, 20 million already dead and 15,000 new infections daily, its devastating scale and impact constitute a global emergency that is undermining social and economic development throughout the world and affecting individuals, families, communities and nations. HIV/AIDS reverses gains in human development and denies people the basic opportunities for living long, healthy, creative and productive lives. It impoverishes people and places burdens on households and communities to care for the sick and dying, while claiming the lives of people in their most productive years. HIV/AIDS also results in social exclusion and violations of human dignity and rights affecting people's psychological well-being. While the long-term consequences may not yet be visible here, Ukraine is glimpsing the enormity of the problem in its newly independent country. The number of reported cases of HIV infection in the country has increased 20 times in the past five years yielding estimates of 300,000 to 400,000 people already infected, which is approximately 1% of the adult population. The Declaration of Commitment of the UN General Assembly Special Session on HIV/AIDS notes "the potential exists for a rapid escalation of the epidemic". The dynamics of the spread of the epidemic can be indicative of the potential magnitude of future human development impacts, deepening over time and affecting future generations. (excerpt)
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  20. 20
    297244

    WHO grant helps Ukraine combat tuberculosis.

    Connections. 2006 Jan; [2] p.

    In September 2005, the World Health Organization (WHO) awarded Ukraine a 2.5 million dollar grant to combat the country's growing tuberculosis epidemic, according to Mykola Polischuk, who was Minister of Health at the time the grant was awarded. This funding will provide for the purchase of high-quality medications and allow for the cost-effective treatment of 75,000 patients over three years beginning in January 2006. The new treatment program will employ the DOTS (Directly Observed Therapy-Short Course) strategy, which has been recognized as the world's best strategy for fighting TB largely due to its reliance on cheaper microbiological methods of diagnosis rather than X-rays. Patients are first identified using microscopy services then prescribed the correct dosage of anti-TB medicines for a period of six to eight months. If administered accurately, DOTS can successfully treat TB in 99 percent of cases. Ukrainian President Viktor Yushchenko echoed WHO's decision to increase TB funding in October when he pledged to increase health funding, restore the country's failing health system, and fight the spread of HIV and tuberculosis, according to the Associated Press. (excerpt)
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  21. 21
    297238

    In 2005, AIDS epidemic reaches all-time high.

    Connections. 2006 Feb; [1] p.

    Nearly 5 million people worldwide were infected with HIV in 2005, marking the largest jump in new cases since the disease was first recognized in 1981, according to the AIDS Epidemic Update 2005 released by UNAIDS last December in conjunction with World AIDS Day. The virus claimed the lives of 3.1 million people in 2005, with more than half a million of these deaths occurring among children. Although sub-Saharan Africa and Southeast Asia continue to remain the hardest hit areas, the report clearly indicates that the virus is continuing to spread at alarming rates within Eurasia, bringing the region to the brink of a full-blown epidemic. The number of people living with HIV in Eastern Europe and Central Asia reached 1.6 million in 2005, a 20-fold increase from 2003. Even more striking, AIDS claimed the lives of 62,000 people there last year-nearly double the mortality rate attributed to the virus 2003. (excerpt)
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  22. 22
    297179

    International public health organizations warn of burgeoning HIV / AIDS epidemic in Eastern Europe and Eurasia.

    Connections. 2003 Aug; [2] p..

    A trio of reports issued by international public health groups last month projects a dire future for Eastern Europe and Central Asia if immediate action is not taken to stem the rising tide of HIV/AIDS. Although the onslaught of HIV hit these nations more than a decade after the disease emerged in many other parts of the world, infection rates have skyrocketed during the past five years and are growing faster than in any other region. Currently, Russia and Ukraine are home to the bulk of the 1.2 million HIV-positive individuals living in the region, but the social conditions that are enabling the epidemic to spread so quickly in these two countries-high incidence of unemployment and poverty, rapid social change, increasing rates of substance abuse, a escalating commercial sex trade, and decreasing levels of healthcare services and educational opportunities, for example-are also shared by other nations in the region. Since 1995, pockets of HIV epidemics have sprung up in communities stretching from the Baltics to Eastern Europe, the Caucasus and Central Asia. According to World Bank reports, there are indications that the epidemic is making its way from "high-risk core transmitter groups," such as needle-sharing injecting drug users (IDUs) and commercial sex workers, through bridge populations, such as their sex partners, into the population at large. A World Bank study released July 10 uses the Balkan nations of Bulgaria, Croatia, and Romania to illustrate this phenomenon, citing high levels of sexually transmitted infections (STIs), sharp increases in risky sexual behavior, and a lack of knowledge about HIV/AIDS as key indicators that the deadly disease is poised to make inroads into the general population. (excerpt)
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  23. 23
    297156

    Odessa workshop helps build capacity among Ukrainian clinicians who care for people living with HIV / AIDS.

    Connections. 2004 Jan; [2] p..

    A recent Anti-retroviral Therapy Training Workshop held in Odessa, Ukraine, marked the start of an ongoing collaboration between AIHA and the Los Angeles-based AIDS Healthcare Foundation (AHF). It was the first training hosted under the aegis of the newly established World Health Organization Regional HIV/AIDS Care and Treatment Knowledge Hub for which AIHA is the primary implementing partner. This Knowledge Hub was created in response to the burgeoning HIV/AIDS pandemic in Eastern Europe and Central Asia to serve as a crucial capacity-building mechanism for reaching WHO's "3 by 5" targets for the region. (excerpt)
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  24. 24
    296294

    All rights for all children. UNICEF in Central and Eastern Europe and the Commonwealth of Independent States.

    UNICEF. Regional Office for Central and Eastern Europe and the Commonwealth of Independent States

    Geneva, Switzerland, UNICEF, Regional Office for Central and Eastern Europe and the Commonwealth of Independent States, 2005. 48 p.

    All children have the right to survive, to be educated, to be healthy, to have a name and nationality. All children have the right to participate in decisions that affect them. And all children have the right to be protected from harm. UNICEF, the United Nations Children's Fund, speaks out for the rights of all children in Central and Eastern Europe and the Commonwealth of Independent States. The region faces unique challenges. No other region has been through so dramatic a transformation in so short a time and the scale of the changes has had a serious impact on children. Rising poverty and unemployment and falling social spending have excluded vast numbers of children from the economic progress that has been made in recent years. Millions of families are under pressure: the systems that once guided their lives have vanished and they must find their way in a new and unfamiliar landscape, confronting new dangers such as HIV/AIDS and the trafficking of drugs and human beings. (excerpt)
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  25. 25
    296618

    UNICEF calls for priority focus on girl child.

    UN Chronicle. 1990 Sep; 27(3):[2] p..

    All programmers of the United Nations Children Fund (UNICEF) and strategies in the 1990s will address explicitly the status of the girl child and her needs, particularly in nutrition, health and education, with a view to eliminating gender disparities. The recommendation was made by the UNICEF Executive Board at its 1990 regular session. Endorsing the priority focus given to the girl child, the Board also asked UNICEF to implement gender-sensitive monitoring and evaluation mechanisms to assess progress made in reducing disparities between girls and boys in health care and primary education programmes. The Board also requested UNICEF Executive Director James P. Grant to highlight the girl child in the annual report on women in development and to submit to the 1992 Board session and every second year thereafter, a full report on progress made on the situation of the girl child. (excerpt)
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