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    072406

    A nutrition model for developing nations with special reference to Bangladesh.

    Shams-ur-Rahman; Clarke HR

    BANGLADESH DEVELOPMENT STUDIES. 1991 Sep; 19(3):83-95.

    A linear programming model of nutritional planning, applied to 3 nutrition problems of nutrition planning in 2 villages, Shitalpur and Kulia-Durgapur in southwest Bangladesh is described and results are discussed. The model takes into consideration features identified as affecting nutritional requirements: age and sex, recommended requirements by age and sex, activity level, proportion of lactating women, excess requirement for lactating and pregnant women, and proportion of women pregnant. Other important factors are production of nutrients in the region as affected by assimilable number of nutrients and net yield per acre and number of acres, net usage of nutrients in the region as affected by transfer of crops between regions, and net food import into the region as affected by aid import of food type and exports of food type. Total area of arable land is restriction on production. Consumption = production - net interregional transfers - net foreign trade exports and constraints. It is assumed that any shortfall in domestic production can be met in this supply side analysis. 2 types of policy objectives (self-sufficiency and surplus maximization) are also modeled. The applied model is simplified for the village analysis and the following assumptions are made: there is no trade between villages, transportation cost is not added, and crop yield depends only on land input used in production. The 3 types of nutritional planning problems are that 1) only calorie and protein are considered and arable lands are available year long; 2) calcium and vitamins A, B2, and C (multinutrients) must be met; and 3) inadequate irrigation and flood control technologies limit the amount of land available during the winter and summer months. The Mathematical Programming System and Extension Package (MPSX) was used to solve the simplified model. 8 crops are considered in 10 cropping patterns. The results are that both villages can be net food exporters if all land can be utilized and calorie/protein targets only are the goal. Kulia-Durgapur can achieve nutritional self-sufficiency based on full nutrient intake. With land being used in summer and winter seasons only, only Kulia-Durgapur can achieve nutritional sufficiency and multinutrient food targets. The net value of exports from Kulia-Durgapur is almost equal in value to the net aid requirements of Shitalpur. Multinutrient, objectives affect cropping patterns and shift patterns from cereals to vegetables, and particularly summer vegetables. A policy objective might be set aside a specified amount of arable land for cultivating vegetables.
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