Voluntary Childlessness

Childlessness: a panel study of expressed intentions and reported fertility.

Author: 
Pol LG
Source: 
Social Biology. 1983 Fall; 30(3):318-27.
Abstract: 

This study used data from the 1970 and 1975 National Fertility Surveys to ascertain the consistency between childlessness intentions and subsequent behavior and intentions. Of the 274 white US women who were childless and not pregnant at the time of the 1970 survey, 234 (85%) intended to have children at some point. However, by the time the 1975 re-interview, only 169 women (62%) had followed through with their intentions. In contrast, 38 (95%) of the 40 women who in 1970 intended no children had no children in 1975.

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Becoming voluntarily childless: an exploratory study in a Scottish city.

Author: 
Campbell E
Source: 
Social Biology. 1983 Fall; 30(3):307-17.
Abstract: 

Life history data were collected from 78 individuals who were partners in voluntarily childless marriages in order to identify some of the situations and motives informing the decision to remain childless. The respondents, who were volunteers contacted at family planning clinics in Scotland, were clustered in professional, intermediate, and skilled occupational groups and had been married for an average of 5 years.

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Voluntary and involuntary childlessness in the United States, 1955-1973.

Author: 
Poston DL Jr; Kramer KB
Source: 
Social Biology. 1983 Fall; 30(3):290-306.
Abstract: 

Trends in childlessness among married women in the US between 1910-81 were reviewed using census materials, 2 different procedures were developed for separating involuntary from voluntary childless women, and these 2 procedures were then applied to data collected in 5 national fertility studies to assess trends in voluntary and involuntary childlessness between 1955-73. Census data showed that the childless rate increased from 19.2%-24.1% between 1910-40 and then began to decline until it reached a low of 14.2% in 1965.

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[Childless or childfree? About infecundity and intentional childlessness]

Author: 
Noack T; Ostby L
Source: 
Oslo-Kongsvinger, Norway, Statistisk Sentralbyra, 1983. 50 p. (Artikler fra Statistisk Sentralbyra no. 140)
Abstract: 

The extent of childlessness in Norway was assessed using data collected in the 1977 Norwegian Fertility Survey. A follow-up study was conducted in 1981 to determine how many of the women who were identified in the initial survey as childless were still childless in 1981. Data on these subsequent births was obtained by checking the files of the Central Population Register for any births registered to these childless women between 1979 and 1981. The degree of voluntary childlessness, as revealed by the 1977 survey, was minimal.

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Childlessness and one-child fertility: a comparative and historical analysis of international data

Author: 
Spencer GK
Source: 
Berkeley, Calif, University of California, 1983. 1,427 p.
Abstract: 

This study is a preliminary comparative analysis of 0 and 1 child completed family sizes in the countries and regions of the world. It concentrates especially on an examination of the effect of age at marriage and of different marital statuses on completed family sizes of 0 and 1. These analyses are historical in that they contain information from the beginning of the century through the mid-1970s. They are global in perspective since the basic data are from 515 censuses.

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Perceptions of parenthood and childlessness: a comparison of mothers and voluntarily childless wives ...

Author: 
Callan VJ
Source: 
Population and Environment. 1983 Fall; 6(3):179-89.
Abstract: 

50 mothers and 50 voluntary childless wives selected from an adjective checklist, the personality traits most typical of parents and intentionally childless persons. Both groups of women described parents as "concerned," "loving," "hardworking," "conventional," and "patient", while voluntarily childless wives were more likely to choose the traits "conventional" and "restricted." Voluntarily childless persons were described by a strikingly different set of attributes.

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Characteristics of voluntarily childless women in the Netherlands.

Author: 
Niphuis-Nell M
Source: 
In: Cliquet RL, Dooghe G, Van de Kaa DJ, Moors HG, ed. Population and family in the low countries. III. Voorburg, Netherlands, Netherlands Interuniversity Demographic Institute, 1983. 71-107. (Publications of the Netherlands Interuniversity Demographic Institute (N.I.D.I.) and the Population and Family Study Center (C.B.G.S.) vol. 10)
Abstract: 

This article presents the results of the 1975 Netherlands Survey on Fertility and Parenthood Motivation regarding the social-psychological and social-demographic characteristics of voluntarily childless women.

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Factors affecting early and late deciders of voluntary childlessness

Author: 
Callan VJ
Source: 
Journal of Social Psychology. 1983 Apr; 119(2):261-8.
Abstract: 

The background characteristics, sex role attitudes, and reactions of significant others to their childless status were compared in an Australian study of 55 nonparents who decided prior to or early in marriage not to have children (early deciders) and 23 respondents who deferred childbearing until childlessness became a permanent state (postponers).

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Age pattern of childlessness and probability of first live birth

Author: 
Islam MN; Sarma RSS
Source: 
In: Determinants of fertility in some African and Asian countries. Cairo, Egypt, Cairo Demographic Centre, 1982. 645-76. (CDC Research Monograph Series no. 10)
Abstract: 

An effort is made to make use of the childlessness data of some Asian and Pacific countries to describe some reproductive characteristics of female population. A mathematical model was used to estimate the probability of 1st live birth, mean age at 1st birth, and the waiting time for 1st live birth. The data source was the country fertility reports of the World Fertility Survey (WFS) conducted during the 1970s for the countries of Bangladesh, Fiji, Indonesia, Jordan, Korea, Malaysia, Nepal, Pakistan, Philippines, Sri Lanka, and Thailand.

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